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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

September, 1987 Programs offered for nurserymen Continued from Page 4 economist in agricultural marketing, topics include variety selection, propagation, container and field production, economics of production, pricing and marketing. The fee is $115. "The Production of Field Grown Nursery Stock," will be held Nov. 2-4, by Smeal, Luckham and James S. Coartney, associate professor of horticulture. Pre-register through the Donaldson Brown Center by calling (703) 961-5182. Loans available to small businesses WASHlNGTON—Approximately $3.5 million will be available for small business innovative research grants in fiscal year 1988, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced recently. Applications for the grants, administered by USDA's Cooperative State Research Service, must be filed by Oct. 1. Any business of fewer than 500 employees that is involved in scientific or technological research in one of six areas may apply for funding of up to $50,000 for a six-month feasibility study. Firm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

6 P9E f-v ■ V !fl iwH n»°th^^ o rT e^ e AA 0m ? S SO u e m ° re ha , PPy cus * omers to his pick-your-own orchard in Virginia S a,n ' H|S ,s one of 28 P'ck-your-own grape and peach orchards P-Y-O operations are a peach of a deal By NORM HYDE VFB Broadcast Editor RAPID AN—There are 28 pick-your-own grape and peach orchards listed in this year's Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' guide. Consumers can now find peach and grape operations in virtually every corner of the state. One of the oldest is Goodwin Moore's Moormont Orchards, located on top of Clark's Mountain in Orange County. "The only place Gen. Robert E. Lee ever had all his lieutenants together at one time," Moore will tell you with a grin. Moore is nearly 70 years old, but is still the heart and soul of this family operation, answering a toll-free information telephone himself daily and monitoring the activities at the old loading dock. His orchard was originally a packing and shipping operation like m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

September, 1987 Happy birthday ACRES is celebrating its fourth year of service PARK RIDGE, ILL.— Four years ago Farm Bureau's newest service-to-member program, Agricultural Communication and Resource Evaluation System, ended its pilot phase and began commercial operations providing farmer members access to a database of constantly updated market news and information. ACRES was first conceived as the result of a 1980 study directive from the American Farm Bureau Federation's House of Delegates. ACRES began its pilot phase in October 1981 with eight state Farm Bureaus taking part: Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, lowa, Michigan, Ohio and South Carolina. The first three state Farm Bureaus to enter into commercial operating agreements in July 1983 were Arkansas, Michigan and Ohio. As of its fourth birthday, Farm Bureau ACRES has grown to an all-time high of individual subscribers and now reaches into 35 states, which includes Virginia. Along with serving farmers and ran- Edward Des...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

8 Virginia ham puts state on map By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB Newt Editor SURRY—Virginia ham—the food that made the Commonwealth famous—is becoming as popular around the nation and abroad as it is at home. According to ham curer S. Wallace Edwards Jr., president of S. Wallace Edwards & Sons, the tasty Southern tradition is now sold in all 50 states. "Country hams had been known in this locale for a long, long time," he said. "It's very adaptable to the present interest in regional foods." His son, Sam Edwards, vice president of the company, illustrated the point. Louisiana has Cajun cuisine, Texas has Tex-Mex foods and Virginia has ham, he pointed out. The Edwards also produce and sell bacon and sausage. Wallace said the pork products are also packaged with other state commodities, such as biscuit mixes, peanuts and honey. "We try to emphasize Virginia in our marketing," he said. "Virginia has a very strong image, a very positive image." In fact, Virginia pork products realized ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

September, 1987 Alternative enterprise sprouts in Woodstock By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor (Editors note: This is the second in a series on diversification. This series will look at the various steps farmers across the state have taken to supplement their incomes.) WOODSTOCK—They 're green, fluffy and a gourmet delicacy. Alfalfa sprouts have turned into a profitable alternative enterprise for a Shenandoah County farmer. Robert Peer, owner and operator of Blue Ridge Food Service Inc., first came in contact with alfalfa sprouts in a most unlikely setting: in Maine while taking a course on basic solar home construction. "There were a lot of health food stores there," he said. "I wasn't even a health food fanatic but I had some alfalfa sprouts on a sandwich. That was probably when we started looking into the alfalfa sprouts." Peer and his wife, Robbie, have been in \ ■vwmmiq J Robert Peer may expand his operation in the future. Announcing New Orleans 1988 American Farm. Bureau Convent...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

10 Now, libu Don't Have To Spend $100 In Major Medical Expenses Before Your Prescription Drug Benefits Begin. You don't have to meet a $100 calendar year deductible. And, there's ho claim to file when you go to a Contracting Pharmacy. That's what members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Health Care Program like most about the new Generic Prescription Drug Program. These new benefits, part of Plan 200 and Plan 500 coverage, are now separate from Major Medical. This means that you don't have to meet your Major Medical deductible before your prescription drug benefits begin. Here's how the Generic Prescription Drug Program works. When you enroll in Plan 200 or Plan 500, you receive a plastic prescription drug card. To have a prescription filled, all you do is show your prescription drug card to your pharmacist and pay a small deductible, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Virginia FARM BUREAU NEWS «Of£SS»ONAI WAMtfjS * AM 4194139 3 W**» Hv, H0258 H| B - C. Subscriber 1 TAKE AS NEEDEDCAUTION km F...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

September, 1987 What is woman's role in agriculture? By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor Helen Neese, Virginia Farm Bureau women's chairman, heard perspectives on the women's role in agriculture at the Associated Country Women of the World Council Meeting in London in July. Dr. Ellen McLean, president of the ACWW, told the attendees from 28 countries that women should "recognize, reassess and redirect" their actions. "We should recognize what we have done and hope to do," Mrs. Neese reiterated. "We should reassess where we have been and where we are going and we should redirect our efforts, energy and confidence." Not all of the participants in the program were women, however. The crowd was greeted by Collin Spedding, pro-vice chancellor of Reading University. Mrs. Neese said Spedding emphasized agriculture was an appropriate subject of study on any campus. "Many have never heard of agriculture," he said, "but everybody has heard of food." Dr. Michael Wales, commonwealth secretariat of...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

12 Eleanor Whinnerv Media Specialist A Taste VIRGINIA Visit country store (Editor's note: Eleanor Whinnery is a media specialist with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.) The VDACS Country Emporium agricultural exhibit at the Virginia State Fair will be bigger and better than ever before. Fourteen different agricultural industries will be exhibiting their products. Spectators in the Virginia World Building (formerly the Agriculture Building) will see the latest developments in the apple, peanut, dairywine, beef, direct marketing, sweet potato, pork, Christmas tree, egg, soybean, corn, chicken and shiitake mushroom industries of Virginia. Each day during the fair a food product will be featured in the form of taste samples. For a nominal charge you will be able to experience tempting treats, such as sweet potato tarts, apple Waldorf salad, homemade rolls, sugared peanuts, beef and pork kabobs, grilled chicken drumsticks, nacho cheese and chips, nutty chocola...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

September, 1987 Future farmers cultivated at SHS By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor COURTLAND—Because of the decline in the farm economy over the past few years, has there been a decrease in participation in the Future Farmer of America program in the schools? Southampton High and Middle Schools report an increase in membership in FFA, like many agricultural-oriented counties in the Old Dominion. Southampton is one of the state's leading agricultural counties, producing corn, soybeans, peanuts, watermelons, livestock and other crops. According to Ernest Claude, director of vocational education for Southampton County schools, 155 students are active in the FFA program between the two schools. 'There's a decline in the number of members that actually live on farms," he said, "but there's not a decline in the mem- bership of the organization." The membership of FFA is linked with the agriculture courses taught at the school. The Southampton County Vocational-Technical School offers agric...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

14 Aides get experience in the field Continued from Page 1 Tobacco production also highlighted the visit to Pete Callahan's farm near South Hill. Each aide received information about how tobacco was cured and then took a walk through a tobacco field. Souvenir tobacco leaves were handed out. Margaret Watkins, who runs the district office for U.S. Congressman Dan Daniels, said she had never received such a close look at farming operations before. "It's an education for me," she said. "I really don't know that much about farming or tobacco and I'm fascinated." Bobby Flippen, the agricultural extension agent for Greensville and Southamp- Top 10 Counties Size Washington 2,577 Rockingham 2,405 Scott 2,351 Roanoke 2,037 Henrico 2,023 Franklin 1,996 Tazewell 1,959 Smyth 1,899 Albemarle 1,887 Nansemond 1,828 Percent Membership Lee 103.62 Appomattox 103.47 Middlesex 103.43 Loudoun 103.41 Southampton 102.34 Nelson 101.93 Northampton 101.82 GloucesterMathews 101.31 Page 101.13 Floyd 101.03 GORM...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

September, 1987 For sale: King Alfred Daffodil bulbs, $20.00 per hundred. 804-725-2881 EVERGREENS—Many varieties. Great selection and sizes. Boxwood, Firs, Hemlock, Hollies, Pines, Spruce, Yews. Mountain View Nursery, Rt. 1 Box 39, Greenville VA 24440. 703-337-2343 For sale: English Boxwoods, phone 703-745-2855 APPLE TREES, OVER 100 ANTIQUE AND MODERN VARIETIES, BROCHURE, BURFORD BROTHERS, MONROE VA 24574 Timber sales, appraisals, cruising, management, reforestation. National Resources Consultants, Registered Consulting Foresters. 804-296-1464 Experienced man will run stock farm for absentee owner. Housing req u i red—7o3-728-3459 Photographer—weddings, bridal, other portraits, insurance record photos, professional, reasonable. Lowe's—Bo4-272-9295 after 6:00 p.m. Sewer and drain cleaning. Any size pipe, any blockage. We specialize in large drain pipe cleaning serving all Virginia. Call for estimate—Fredericksburg—7o3-371-7788 Craftsmen—housewives sell your crafts! Lists: 650 shops a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

Farm Bureau Your risk doesn't stop when your harvesting is over. Why should your coverage? /g g v ______ "-'r' " ""' fW "- * t^yi/. H \9 %* V T"; A; •*„. t - i-"r V& r - ' O)/ - ,V - « W \°V at I||| fjfljJ ' m ' S^^^;;-^; ' £\ .. , mf wl I /£*-/ /ijSff'HHRP S ? I I fIP ||I|^M^nf^ VB « . p^ / j^wg^f ; " dBCBg : SLJHHHIHHi IiEJ3IifIHDHH VOL. 46, THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S September, 1987 1 *\mfo - ■ ' Tli axßlbL 1 *H Sfe* 1 410 Pc^ I _j|3^MUyF^ ■ PJMeOL nMHPk ■ ' 1 IL\ \ ■ ft mm, jtam I OL ■ *^IL. ■ Jfy .£ kv w ' ' T^HlMylHni > \!* : %f- ■< /Svi 1 '' «\ - " tlp< Pk * ,<r r V hr " < ' *- !?-" *"~ l^ \ h ,1 W ■ j^^Hß ■ 1 JB On the cover Legislative aides get experience first hand down on the farm. See Page 1 Farm Safety Week See Page 3 Hamming it up in Surry See Page 8 FFA grows in schools See Page 13 have a policy that offers protection for crops lost in storage. The cost of the coverage is minimal considering the potentia...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

o Farm Bureau Vol. 46, No. 9 I 1 mttwrnr* *riiiJ A i 1 «. :i^H hCT!2^^Kh!i o ; I f'irWt-TliwwW I wWBBA.i- Jr JT B> •*»'&: -mmm , T 4)« Although it hasn't made prime time yet, the satellite auction was popular with thos< in the Virginia cattle industry. (Photo by Norm Hyde) Cattle auction adds new dimensions to agriculture By NORM HYDE VFB Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—The cow didn't jump over the moon in this case, but its picture almost did. Virginia's cattle industry took a flying leap into the future Sept. 14 when the first-ever satellite Tel-O-Auction was held. The Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, the Virginia Cattlemen's Association and the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services worked together to pull off the event, which featured video footage of lots of cattle shot on the farm. Bidders from around the country were invited to tune into the program through a satellite dish and to bid through the same teleconference auction...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

2 Vote: FB members make a difference Political awareness. That's the catchword for all Farm Bureau members November 3 —Election Day in the Commonwealth. All elections are important, but 1987 seems all the more urgent for our rural families as state demographics continue to favor urban areas, placing more and more emphasis on urban issues. This particular local and state election year is also significant because it is the Bicentennial year of the U.S. Constitution, and that fact alone should be a motivating force for every U.S. citizen to vote. But it won't. Many will again stay home from the polls and let others decide for them the representation they receive for the future. Statewide, only 42.7 percent of the registered voters cast ballots for all elections in 1986. That was just more than 1.1 million out of a potential 2.7 million having a say in their representation. And as Virginia becomes even more urbanized, political representation reflects that trend. Urban legislators and l...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

October, 1987 Farmers' market fund struggle is heating up By NORM HYDE VFB Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—The much anticipated results of a three-month study are in and now the battle will be to win full funding for a recommended initial statewide system of farmers' markets in Virginia. The Fantus Co. of New Jersey announced its recommendation for which sites in the Old Dominion should be included in the initial network at a meeting of the state Farmers' Market Board at the beginning of September in Richmond. The seven localities that made the final cut are broken down in three categories— Accomack, Carroll and Halifax counties for shipping point markets and the cities of Chesapeake, Williamsburg and Lynchburg for traditional retail market facilities. Hanover County was suggested for the only full-fledged combination wholesale/retail market site. Fantus Vice President Saul Grohs told the Farmers' Market Board that of all their recommendations, choosing between Carroll and Wythe counties ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

4 How will Virginians vote on Nov. 3? RICHMOND—How will you vote Nov. 3? The decisions on how you will stand on issues are not to be taken lightly, said Jean Guthrie, assistant director of the Public Affairs Department of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "Farm Bureau members have a responsibility to get informed on the issues in order to make knowledgeable decisions," she said. VFBF tries to aid its members in making these decisions in two ways. One way is through policy development. 1986 General Assembly voting record HOUSE SB SB SB HB HB Member 126 278 357 111 292 Abbitt Y Y Y Y Y Ackerman Y Y Y Y Y Agee Y Y Y Y Y Allen Y Y Y Y Y Almand Y Y Y Y Y Andrews N Y Y Y Y Axselle Y Y Y Y Y Ball Y A Y Y Y Beard Y Y Y Y Y Benedetti Y Y Y Y Y Bloxom Y Y Y N Y Brickley Y Y Y Y Y Brown Y Y Y Y Y Byrne N Y Y Y Y Callahan Y Y Y Y Y Calvert Y Y Y Y Y Christian Y Y Y Y Y Cline Y Y Y Y Y Cohen N Y NV Y Y Cooper Y Y Y Y Y Copeland Y Y Y Y Y Councill Y Y Y Y Y Cranwell N Y Y Y Y Creekmore Y Y Y Y...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

October, 1987 1987 General Assembly voting record HOUSE SB HB HB HB SB HB 402(b) 1119 832 395 569 1368 Abbitt Y Y Y N N N Ackerman N Y Y N Y Agee N Y Y Y N N Allen Y Y N N N Aim and Y Y Y Y Y Andrews N Y Y Y Y N Axselle Y N Y Y N N Ball N Y N N N Beard Y Y Y N N Bloxom Y Y N N N Brickley Y Y Y Y Y N Brown N Y Y N Y Byrne N Y Y Y Y Callahan Y Y Y Y Y Calvert Y Y Y Y N Christian Y Y Y Y Y N Cline Y Y N N N Cohen N Y Y Y Y Cooper N Y Y Y Y Copeland Y Y Y Y Y Councill Y Y N N Y N Cranwell Y Y Y N Y Creekmore Y Y N Y Y Crenshaw NV N Y N N Croshaw Y Y Y Y N Crouch Y Y N N N N Cunningham, J.W. Y Y Y Y N Cunningham, R.K. Y Y Y Y Y Deßoer N Y N N Y Diamonstein Y Y N Y Y Dickinson Y Y Y N N Dicks Y Y N N Y Dillard Y Y Y Y Y Dobyns N Y N Y N Ealey N Y Y Y Y Finney Y Y N Y Y Forehand Y Y Y Y N N Giesen Y N N Y N Glasscock Y Y Y Y Y Gordy Y Y Y Y Y Grayson N Y Y Y N Green N Y N Y Y Guest N N Y N N Hall Y Y Y N Y Hanger Y N N N N N Hargrove Y Y Y Y N Harris Y Y Y Y Y Hawkins Y Y N N N Heilig Y Y ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

6 Ground Water By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor SUFFOLK—With the growing concern over the contamination of ground water, farm chemicals have been named as a potential sources of pollution. At a recent seminar on Ground Water Protection Strategy for Localities in Virginia, representatives from local government, agriculture organizations and the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service met to discuss chemical usage and management. Charles Lancaster of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation gave the audience some background on pesticide and fertilizer usage statewide. A 1982 statistic revealed that these chemicals had been applied to over 900,000 acres of land used for farming, forestry, urban recreational facilities and private lawns and gardens. 'The problem of ground water contamination from fertilizers and pesticides is complex," he noted. 'The appearance of pesticides and fertilizers in ground water depends upon the rate at which they are applied, the decomposition rate and wat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

October, 1987 Virginia Horse Center opens Horse show celebrates its construction LEXINGTON—The Virginia Horse Center celebrated the near-completion of Phase I with the third annual Blue Ridge Quarter Horse Association Show and Futurity Aug. 28-30. According to Berkley Gray Jr., chairman of the board of directors, 'This facility is a realization of an idea first conceived in 1969 and nurtured by the Virginia Horse Council, the General Assembly and three governors." While Phase I has not been completed yet, core facilities have been constructed; they include two fire-proof stables for 240 horses, a show ring, a covered outdoor arena, an entry pavilion, a schooling ring and a hunter trials course. Frank Bierman of Facility Programs at the center said two more stables are expected to be completed this winter. An indoor arena, Grand Prix rings, a five-mile network of trails, service buildings and the sales pavilion will be started in 1988. Future construction includes a polo field and a ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1987

8 Southside farmers find ways to earn new money with broccoli, cantaloupes ■H 0 J K • ' ■ Pw; •Wl'** I I 1 I Donnie and Peggy Moore relax at home with their son, Daniel. The couple has been very active in the Virginia Farm Bureau's Young Farmer Program. (Photo by Penna Plymire) (Editor's note: This is the third in a series on diversification, highlighting the ways farmers around the state have developed to supplement their incomes.) CHATHAM—Tobacco has always been the cash crop in Southside Virginia. But with recent health promotions and competition with imported tobacco, the markets for Virginia tobacco are shrinking. Farmers like Donnie Moore are wondering about the future of tobacco and are HARVEST SAVINGS FARM BUREAU Compare These Prices High productivity tillage tools Safemark All Season e/r for Farm Bureau Members. • Steel belted radial Available in plain, notched, • All season tread flat center and cone. • Road Hazard warranty • Farm Bureau Quality P155/80R13 $32.00 B ° ARD P...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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