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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WINTER IRRIGATION. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

WINTER IRRIGATION. Nearly all the hill and valley land in this state, if once thoroughly saturated with water, during the winter months, will produce a crop without any, or at least but little more rain for the season; in many localities a sufficient quantity of rain does not fall during the entire winter to thoroughly saturate the soil, down to the point where water always stands, or to a reasonable depth below the surface; in some localities the ground is too impervious to admit the rains, in others it presents such facilities for surface drainage that opportunity is not given for saturating the soil, notwithstanding the abundance of rain. We all know that in this country, when the rainy season is over, the growing plants depend upon the moisture that has been stored up in the soil, except in a few very limited districts where summer irrigation has been introduced. If that supi>ly is insufficient, crops must fail; and hence the necessity of artificial means to supjily t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Flower Garden. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

The Flower Garden.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE KIDNEY-LEAVED WULFENIA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

THE KIDNEY-LEAVED WULFENIA. We embellish our " Flower Garden" department for this week, with the accompanying illustration of one of California's most beautiful flowrets. The Kiduey-leaved Wul/enia, which belongs to the Figwort family. This is a plant rarely met with in this region, although it is abundant on the Columbia River and in Oregon. The specimen from which the sketch has been made was procured by Prof. Bolander, from a messy ledge' in Marin County. This plant is liable to be mistaken for the Romanzojfia Sitkenais, another Pacific Coast plant, named in honor of Prince ltomanoff, of the Imperial family of Russia, and found very abundantly in this vicinity. The plant which Aye illusti-ate is very pretty for a border or rock-plant, while, in its blossoms of blue, it is arranged mnoh like the European forget-me-not. Our florists would no doubt find it much to their advantage if they would pay more attention to obtaining and propogating the more rare varieties of our native flow...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOW TO HAVE GOOD ROSES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

HOW TO HAVE GOOD ROSES. To Secure good flowers, and a constant bloom with the Teas, Bourbons and other perpetual varieties, a few things are necessary. First, all fading and finished blooms should be clipped off. Nature seems to tend always to the production of seed, as the object of bloom and fructification. As the amateur florist does not want rose seed, but flowers, allowing the former to remain on is not only unsightly, but is far more exhausting to the plant than profuse blooming. 2d. The rose slug, living on the green part of the leaf till only the skeleton is left must be removed without delay. This we accomplish very readily by injecting, with a common tin syringe, soap suds made from carbolic soap in a common watering pot. The slug works mostly on the under side of the loaf, but the carbolic soap, with which the whole bush should be deluged, if it does not kill outright, soon displaces it by its offensiveness peculiarly obnoxious to all insect life. [The aphis and other ann...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BULBS AND THEIR CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

BULBS AND THEIR CULTURE. The ground should be deeply dug—lß inches is not too deep—well pulverized, should be moderately rich, but no manure should be used. Hyacinths should be planted from three to four inches deep. Tulips may be planted in a separate bed. Some plant hyacinths in circles of four or six of different colors, and between these, smaller circles of crocus. In the centers of the circle of hyacinths, an iris, lily, or crown imperial may be planted. The same system may be adopted with tulips. The Narcissus is a beautiful and early flowering bulb. There are now several improved varieties of them—double, polyanthus, and single narcissus. They are planted as tulips, and are of the easiest culture. The colors are mostly yellow, of different shades; but there are some white, fragrant and beautiful. The Crocus may be planted in the borders of beds, or in clusters. Anemones can only be safely planted in the months above named, in fine, friable, welldrained soils. Snowdrops show t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
INTERESTING TO FLORISTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

INTERESTING TO FLORISTS. The following letter, addressed, on the 7th of December last, to the editor of the Oakland News, by Mr. John lions, theAvell-' known florist of Third street, Oakland, will be interesting to florists and others, as a hint for the future. The experience of 1870, very nearly coincides with that of 1869, as given by Mr. X., and should lead the lovers of flowers to look after their pets closely, during the two last weeks in December, as the most dangerous of any portion of the winter. If they survive the frosts of those days, they may be considered as safe for the winter. Ed. News: —As the winter has now fairly set in—for we have had both rain and frost —and as rain during the season is more than probable, calculations for a corresponding amount of frost may therefore be anticipated. It would, therefore, be well for those taking an interest in garden decoration and who desire a good display of flowers during the ensuing season, to guard against the coming frosts ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR CALIFORNIA TYPE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

OUR CALIFORNIA TYPE. In parting, at the close of our last volume, with our old typographical "dress," and issuing our papers in new type it is with pleasure that we can say a good word for the old font which served our use for four years, and received the praise of many readers for its plain, durable and easily read face. Cast by Messrs. Faulkner & Bon, in 18GG, it was the first font issued of California made type, and has worn better than any other body type we have ever used in a long period of printing and publishing experience. Bince the establishment of the abovenamed type-foundry on this coast, the business has increased very rapidly, until there are now three firms and about 100 persons employed in the business of making and furnishing type and printing materials in this city. The first and largest of these is the California Type Foundry Company, of which Mr. Geo. L. Faulkner is agent. This company has recently removed their salesroom and manufactory to more spaci...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Household Reading. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Household Reading.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
High Heeled Shoes and Flat Feet. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

High Heeled Shoes and Flat Feet. Much, but not. half enough is being said with regard to the high and small heeled shoes ho generally worn by the ladies at the present time. A persistent use of such heels will destroy the beauty of the best formed foot, besides producing other phisiologieal deformities and injuries. A high heeled shoe, with the slender point usually given to it, cannot properly support the arch of the foot; but allows it to sink, whereby the bones and ligaments become stretched, weakened and displaced, and the foot becomes flattened and more elongated—in other words the person becomes flat-footed, and looses the elasticity and strength of step, and grace of motion which nature designed in the construction of the arch. People with high arched feet walk easier, more graceful and witli much less fatigue than those with flat feet. A depression of the natural arch of the foot will often increase its length from a half to three quarters of an inch. High heeled shoes weake...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Buckwheat Cakes—Are they Wholesome? [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Buckwheat Cakes—Are they Wholesome? It is very common to class buckwheat cakes, in reference to digestibility, with "flannel cakes," which are made of wheat flour; but they differ materially. There IB an instinct that gives relish to buckwheat in cold weather, which is explained by the fact that that description of flour gives out more heat to the body, while wheat gives more nutriment and less heat. The stomach will bear a greater quantity of buckwheat, for it is lighter and spongy, and the j gastric juice readily permeates the pulpy mass and gives it easy digestion. It cannot assume the doughy toughness that j makes wheaten cakes so hard to digest. To mix wheat-flour with buckwheat, is to take away the best properties of buckwheat cakes. Ko other cake can be eaten hot j from the griddle without injurious effects akin to those of hot bread. "While buckwheat cakes are undoubtedly wholesome, their deficiency of gluten requires that we do not make our meals exclusively of them. In Cal...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Household Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Household Receipts. How to Cook Dbhed Bbhf.—Place the beef, nicely shaved off, in a fry ing-pan, with butter enough to fry it; let it fry until a little browned, then sprinkle in dry flour,as much as you would take were you going to mix it with water; let it brown but take groat care not to burn it. When browned sufficiently, add it.-am or milk enough to make a gravy; let it boil a few moments, add a little butter and pepper and it is done. Some very frequently boil eggs and cut them up lengthwise, and lay them around on the meat after it is poured on the platter. This makes a very pretty and palatable dish, and with some nice mashed potato, and sweet potatoes and tomatoes with sugar, and just a trifle of vinegar poured over them, supplies a very good breakfast. Another way to cook dried beef is to cut up a sausage in slices and fry until there is enough fat tried out to fry the meat; then put in the beef, and proceed just as for frying in butter, using water instead of milk or crea...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Mechanical Hints. To Fix Phawinus and DESIGNS.—It may be useful to designers and others to know that pencil and chalk drawings fan be set by washing them over with water in which isinglass or any colorlessßiM has been dissolved; it may be necessary, after the first coat is dry to go over it with a second coat. "When this wash is perfectly dry, the work may be varnished with one or two coats of a white spirit varnish, or what is perhaps preferable, a varnish of equal parts of Canada balsam and spirits of turpentine; this last varnish will produce a beautiful gloss and possesses the advantage of being able to stand washing with soap and water. It will be found necessary to apply the isinglass solution very gently, and not go over any part a second time until the first coat shall be perfectly dry, otherwise the lines of the work may be disturbed. It is also necessary to keep the work from the dust, or particles may adhere to the lines and mar the beauty of the work; care must be taken ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Life Thoughts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Life Thoughts. Not to hear conscience is the way to silence it. One hour to-day is worth two to-mor-row. You never lose by doing a good turn. The beauty of holiness, like the sun, is seen by its own light. Blander injures threefold—him that utters, him that is attacked, and him that hearkens. Virtue shines, though contemptibly clad, and is recognized and respected by noble minds. A man that hoards riches and enjoys them not is like an ass that carries gold and eats thistles. There is no such thing as a menial office when you put a true man into it. A menial office is an office with a mean man in it; and it makes no difference whether it is a king's office or a scavenger's office. Hope is the last thing that dies in a man, and although it may often deceive us in the jofurney of life, yet it conducts us along an easier and more pleasant path to OUT journey's end. Cherish thy mother; brief, perchance, the time may' be that she may claim the care she gave. Depend upon yourself; riding u...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Industry of Interest. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

The Industry of Interest. No blister, suvs Beecher, draws sharper than interest does. Of v all Industries none is comparable to that of interest. - It works nil duy and night, in fair weather and foul. It has no sound in its footsteps, Imt travels fast. It gnaws at a man's substance with invisible teeth. It binds industry with its film, as a fly is bound in » spider's web. Debts roll a man over and over, binding hand and foot, and letting him hang upon the fatal mesh until longlegged interest devours him. There is but one thing on a farm like it, and that is the Canada thistle, which swarms new plants every time you break its roots, whose blossoms an; prolific, and every flower the, father of a million seeds. _ Every leaf is an awl, every branch a spear, and every plant like a platoon of bayonets, and a field of them like an armed host. The whole plant is a torment and vegetable curse. And yet a farmer had better make his bed of Canada thistles than to attempt to be at ease upon int...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Be Social at Home. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Be Social at Home. Be Social at Home. —Let parents talk much and talk well at home. A father who is habitually silent in his own house, may be in many respects a wise man; but he is not wise in his silence. We sometimes see parents, who are the life of every company which they enter, dull, silent, uninteresting at home among the children. If they have not mental activity and mental stores sufficient for both, let them first provide for their own household. Ireland exports beef and wheat, and lives on potatoes; and they fare as poorly who reserve their social charms for companions abroad, and keep their dullness for home consultation. It is bettor to instruct children and make them happy at home, than it is to charm strangers or amuse friends. A silent home is a dull place for young peo.ple—a place from which they will escape if they can. They will talk or think of being " shut up" were; and the youth who does not love home is in danger.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
ANGLEWORMS-BY JOSH BILLINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

ANGLEWORMS-BY JOSH BILLINGS. Angleworms are of arth, iivtiiy, and crawl for a living. They live in rich ground— ground that won't raise angleworms, won't raise anything olso; and where angleworms rejoice, corn is sure to bo "bully." If you want your angleworms of ennv size, you minuro your nile. There ain't nothing on arth more miserable tew ponder over and weep about than a half-starved angleworm. Angleworms are a sure crop on good sile, and handy tew hoe, for they plant and harvest themselves. They don't take up much room in the ground, and are az kind to children az a piece of red tape. It issedby the naturalists that angleworm ile rubbed on the back of the neck will cure a man of the lies. I don'tbeleavp this, unless it kills the man. Death is the only reliable heal for lying that lyis been discovered yet. When lieing gets into a man's blcod the only way to get it out is to drain him dry. Angleworms are used as an article of diet to catch tish with; they are handy tew put onto a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Epitaph. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Epitaph. Here lies a lawyer and an honest man; Heaven works a wonder for us now and then. IiiU'UTATioN is what men and women think of us. Character is Avhat God and angels know of us. It is well enough to call a man a "lucky dog," but to call him a puppy or a whelp generally creates a muss. MOBMOMXBU has not inappropriately been termed "mixed husbandry."

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 27 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

WIESTER & CO., No. 17 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco. PATENTS BOUGHT AND SOLD ON COMMISSION. .<i-".;..'7.i>ros Combination ;Tool, •gk This device is just what its name indicates. As a Kitchen Tool it is indigpensible, It will fit and lift with perfect safe■^CajTw^ v'^P'v f.v, any Stove Lid, Frying Pan, Pie Pun, Pot, Kettle, oranyoth<Jis!sjs!»"'^ r vessel or dish used about a stove. It is a complete tool for •^•WPPWKj'JW* I^-'*. ytg^rff-ir^-PH-.**^'^ 'flhiftM tretching carpets, driving tacks, pulling tacks,&c, &c. It L^ '"'"."' ... ".' ..f.'s* -"' iil'^Sfllif-*——— '\"'-*'% nswers the di.nlile purpose of hammer and pincers, and is al- •■-■•■ —i _ mmutiiiiit ko a good Nut Cracker. It ii made of the best malleable iron, ■I' M^jy and the-Hammer, Pincers and tack puller, are all hardened so » '■—Jjg nB to stand" the roughest usage. An Agent is wanted in every town on the Pacific Coast to sell this valuable little i...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 27 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Travelers AGENTS WANTED FOR Zell's New Encyclopedia. This work, the Best, the Latest, and the Cheapest ever published. It is not only a COMPLETE EXCYCIiOPifIDIA, Freshly written, and up with the times, but is also a thorough aud complete Lexicon, it OaMttwr of the Wot-!«l» a Uloirriiplilcul, Ktbltful, legal mid Medlctil l»oll<nmr.v. And the only book ever published containing all these subjects, with 2,000 Engravings. This really wonderful work is to render readily accessible reliable information on every oonueivable subject. No hnniun being could be found to whom it would not prove invaluable. It minutely describes every disease flesh is heir to; explains every legal term or phrase; gives the geography of the entire world; acquaints you with all noted men and women living or dead; describes every country, city and town; defines every word in use in the English language ;pictures the birth-place and gives portraits of many distinguished personages: teaches the correct pro...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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