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Elephind.com contains 14,999 items from Great Southern Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

,»/aV» '»\8/gA< Ever notice the smell of drugs in a chemist's shop — pretty strong, isn't it?—it's not a nice atmosphere to work in, and we chemists have to stand It for such long hours that you can't wonder we're worn out long before close up time. There's an old saying that "few doctors believe In their own physic" — well, a chemist Is much the same as a doctor in that respect, for with my shelves full of stuffs to cure everything under the sun, including "that tired feeling," 1 turn to a cup of good hot tea myself—because 1 find it brisks me up, and there's no harmful reaction afterward*. A freshly made cup of Robut tea at 11 a.m., and another at 3 p.m., with those 1 take at my meals, keeps me pretty alert during the day — 1 know no tea that I like so well as No. 1 Grade Robur — it's absolutely pure, and very cheap at that money, at least, that's my opinion. Tht Chemist.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LUCERNE AS A SOIL RESTORER. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

t LUCERNE AS A SOIL RESTORER. Mr. S. P. Keys, writing in "Hoard's Dairyman," says:—When we come to the question of the upkeep of the fer tility of our farms, we find that we face quite a serious problem. From what source are we to restore the humus, or vegetable matter, that is being rapidly exhausted by continu ous cropping? Manures and commercial fertilisers, while valuable, are not always obtain able. Farmers waste the barnyard manure, and feel that they cannot af ford to buy commercial fertilisers. To fill the bill there must be something within easy access of every farm. The answer to this is—green manures. The king of logumes used in green manuring is lucerne. Not only does it answer every requirement of a green manure, but is is also one of the most valuable of the standard crops. You may be cropping a given piece of land to lucerne, obtaining each year from Ave to seven cuttings, and at the same time you have at hand the means of restoring the fertility of the soil upon whic...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

You can sow-any amount of wild oats, but you will never got a harvest to repay you. You do not need a very long list of funny stories to amuse a woman if she has pretty teeth. . Even though you are fighting in' the streetB o£ Dublin you must be careful you're not Larkin. Cation Newbolt declares that Lot's wife is very human and very modern. Quite worth her. salt, in fact. A reviewer complains that the mi nor poet "lacks humor." Well, being a minor poet is 110 joke. "Aro English girla slow?" asks an .ovening paper. Surely not, tsinco the men have to "run after" theni. Drink is the most paradoxical thing in the world. Those who are most devoted to it are always trying to put it down. . The man who expects to succeed on sympathy will surely fail. Disappointments that come not by our own folly are the trials or cor rections of Heaven; and it is our own fault it they prove not to our advan tage.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

SUFKHRIOD AGONT \\rI.T«t JLUAUAUiiKS, '■'•1 . highly' roconimend Chamber lain's Tablets to anyone who guIters from hcivtlaehos," snys K. Hurry, ft|||,r|liorui|gl| "J|d., Victoria YaMey, Tasmania. " !'J. bill'l'ui't-'il with headaches and tried almu.si everything. Nothing did mo any good until a friend veenmmendeo pj|ainbei.'lian's Tabled and-they sooi; pgli niQ iMghji'ngajn. Wow"! would •lipt be witlioutiv box'ot Chninb'crlaii.'s 'Tftblots in tho liouse." Sold by all' chemUUi auil titoi'ojiyejjoro.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sporting. THE TURF. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

TJI li TURF. ■ .TIor.seowiiei\s arc, reminded that entries for the. Konunbiiriu races, I' whiulr aio to , be" Hold at jSTyoi"i on' Wednesday, January -S, close with the secretary■■■on Monday dvoiiinjr,. January. 19, .at eight o'clock. A committee meeting will be held the same night.at the Victoria hotel for the purpose of making final arrange ments for the races.; So far .every-' thing points to a most success meet '"=• . - •

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CRICKET. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

- CRICKET. A team of cricketers from the Kor umburra, aesociation w ill play a team from the M.C.C. 011 the Mel bourne 'ground to-day. TI10 local association's team will be mostly comprised' of K 01 'n 111 b 111T a. p 1 ay e rs. Players from tlis other clubs could not make fclic trip. ' Wonthaggi are sorfding a team up [ to plaj' the local association 011 Jan uary 31. The match will be played: at Otittrim. , Owing to the Bushmen's sports al Outtrim 011 Saturday there will be, no locul crickofc iixtnvos pla^-cd. The result of u.oi local competition "-places Kongwak at the head of the list again. Kor umburra's effort to rcach .Kongwak's score of the previous Saturday re sulted in what might be called a most successful failure. All of the batsmen—those from Avhoni runs are generally expected—batted too < much 011 the lareful side, with the result that the whole side were out t'or 96, after having one for 33 011 the first day's play. In their second attempt the 'Burra did bet...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ANTIQUITY OF HAIRPINS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

THE ANTIQUITY OF HAIRPINS. Hairpins have been elaborated as a mcuiis of decoration since the earliest times. Particularly 'beautiful is the ueiicaey of their workmanship, two of the linest specimens being the gold l>ins nvhich were found at Salamis in Cyprus, and are now in the British .Museum. Jfiven more handsome were the Saxon pins of a later date, with their shank of brass, head of gold, and embellishment of garnets and pearls. There were, too, the larger sort of pins so conspicuously and fre quently mentioned in the Bible. The instrument driven by Jael through the temple of Sisera was probably a tent pin, -while Delilah fastened the web on Samson's hair with a pin or batten. In the Middle Ages pins were a great fashion—indeed a necessity— in France, and we have it on record that in 1347 twelve thousand pins were removed from the royal wurdrobe for one of the French princesses. The convenience was probably a little later in reaching England, but iu 1510 we hear of Queen Cathe...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE KHEDIVE AND THE AMERICAN SALESMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

THE KHEDIVE AND THE AMERICAN SALESMAN. An amusing reminiscence of the present Khedive of Egypt is told by -Mr. E. Alexander Powell, late consular representative of tlie United States at • Alexandria, in his book, "The Last Frontier." Mr. Powell says he re ceived a .call from the chairman of an American firm whose special line of business was the manufacture of agricultural and weii-drilling machin ery. Mr. Powell's visitor explained that as he was passing through Egypt ho thought it might be possible to ob tain an audience with the Khedive: — Agriculture and its attendant prob lems of irrigation and fertilisation constitute tue sole hobby and amuse ment of the present Khedive, Abbas Hilini. He is consequently a ready and liberal purchaser of all improved types of agricultural machinery, which he puts to practical use on his great estates. The request of my compatriot was duly transmitted to the grand master of ceremonies, and shortly thereafter a reply reached ma that named the day ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

yeh fu/l of puoj m lAi, urrafyfwt ! ?t , ■&&&; Vi> t ■ * ; ay Xjjv ^i jwgi wig/hd/m

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HEALTH NOTES. The Evil of Late Suppers. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

HEALTH NOTES. J The Evil of Late Suppers. Late or heavy suppers are a com mon cause of , insomnia, especially that form of it in which people fall into a heavy sleep, only to awake with a start an hour or two later and lind themselves unable to sleep again until early morning perhaps. Digestion comes almost to a dead stop during sleep, so that sullicient time should be allowed for the last meal to be dis posed of before the hour for retiring. This interval should be two hours at least, which means that half-past eight is as a rule late enough for the evening meal. In any case, the food which is taken then ought to be of a light nature, and not include pork, cold meat, or any other article of diet which is alow of digestion. Coffee and strong tea are unsuitable at this hour, as they tend to cause sleep lessness. Cocoa, made with water, is a much better beverage for use with tl e evening meal or after 'it.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Too True. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

Too True. There is a happy mean in every thing. It is -said that a 6lirowd old lady heard her married daughter say: "IE my hushand doesn't do such and Buch a tiling, lie'll And himself in hot water." ; "My child," said the old lady, "a man is liko an egg. Kept In hot' water a; little while he may hail soft, but keep him there long and he hardens!" Each, high achievement is a sign and token of the whale nature's pos sibility. What a piece of the man was for that shining moment it is the duty of the whole man to 'he ah/ays. The ^discovery of happiness may well be the great nim of wisdom; and we needs must .be happy our selves before we can know that wis dom itself contains all.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A DOUBTFUL BARGAIN. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

A DOUBTFUL BARGAIN. The marriage ceremony as seen in America is often very quaint, accord ing to our staider ideas and traditions. In his "Wonder Book" the Reverend L. B. Bates, long associated with the East Boston Bethel, U.S.A., tells of an amusing marriage ceremony perform ed Iby his father:— , About nine o'clock one night the old parsonage bn Cape Cod was approach ed >by a man and a woman in a "one horse shay." Hearing the - wheels, Father Bates went to the door, to see coming up the -walk a buxom lass of two hundred pounds or so, followed •by a very little man. With a giggle she announced: "We've come to be married, par son, haven't we, Bill?" . An energetic nudge succeeded in eliciting the desired affirmation from "Bill." The parson examined the li cense and -proceeded to business. "Please join your right hands," lie said. "Dearly beloved, you are gath ered here 'for the purpose of holy ma trimony. Do you " i But' he was here interrupted by the bride. "Say; parson, before y...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

WATSON'S N?IO SUPREME AMONG SCOTCH WHISKIES AGE AND QUALITY GUARANTEED. *JAMES WATSON & CPU? DUNDEE.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. The Beresfords have all been fa mous for the courage that 'borders on recklessness. Lord William Beres ford Berved in the Zulu War in 1879, winning the V.C., and in his book, "Campaigns of a War .Correspondent," Mr. Melton Prior relates some striking , stories of him:— | In the retreat Lord William Beres ford, turning around, saw the four legs of a -white horse kicking in the air, Realising at once that it belonged to one of our men, lie rode straight for it, and found that the horse had been shot and that the rider had fallen half stunned. "Get up!" Lord William said to the man, but he seemed to dazed to an swer; whereupon Lord William said, "If you don't get up at once I will jump down and punch your head!" —at which the man did rise slowly. Lord William succeeded in helping him on to the horse behind him; once mounted, the man clutched Beresford around the waist, and so they gallop ed off. All the time this was talcing place the Zulus were firing from a d...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Avoiding Eye-Strain. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

Avoiding Eye-Strain. Eye-strain is said to be largely a defect of civilisation. To counteract it, children should be cncouraged to use tlieir eyes at long range. A teacher who has a surprisingly small amount of eye-strain among her pupils attri butes it to her practice of making the scholars drop their work at the end of each hour and look out of the win dow. There is a contest as to who can see the farthest. This rests and trains the eyes and teaches observa tion. A woman who docs line sewing for her living found her eyes strained and weak. She was advised to drop lier sewing every half-hour and look for f. minute into space. Relief was quick, and the eye-strain disappeared. Short-sighted people who hold their book or work close will ease eye strain and lengthen their vision if they frequently remove their glasses rnd look at some object on the hori zon. The long-distance training will not, however, relieve eye-strain that comes from astigmatism, reckless dis regard of the eyes, or...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Impure Air and Scrofula. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

Impure Air and Scrofula. The atmosphere o£ all rooms should be frequently renewed by i>roper ven tilation. The best method o£ accom plishing this has been for many years a subject closely studied by sanitar ians. In rooms, and especially in bed rooms, the fireplace should always be iel't unclosed. The windows should be pulled down l'roin the top, and up from the bottom. All rooms, and es pecially sleeping apartments, should be well aired during the day. Impure air in bedrooms is considerd by emin ent medical authorities to be one ot the most potent causes of consumption and scroLula. A well-known Frencn physician who has devoted much at tention to studies of this nature says: "It will often be found, on examina tion, that scrofulous diseases are caused by vitiated air, and it is not always necssary that there should have been a prolonged stay in such an atmosphere. Only a few hours each day is sufficient; and a person may live in a most healthy district, pass the greater part of ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

Danger Signals. —: "-0: There .nrc two ssrious sigiia's of ki lncy ills The first si^n 1 come? fro n, t! c ba :1c with : u ncr..u3'achoj an I pa'iu. L'l-c seco 11 ■ iijrui comesl.in-the kidney secretions, the urine is thinaud pale; or to) highly'colore 1' unil sho.viu j briok-ilust-like deposit. Urin ation is intie'juen'', too frequent, or cxecs •>ive. . Yon should head: these dangjr s'gn 1 bifore. chronic complicati'ii? s:t in diabetee, (Jropy, ]5rig! it's disc;Hi. Talcs DjanVi ISackachc ICidnoy I'ills in tim3 an I t'le cure is simple. ■■■■•■> N Mrs Inchcs, Atino Road (<ietr cemetery) Korumbjr.-a,says : " I luve In I t.-o-ible w. h my b id; for a lo:i ^ Liu',it w i1 siiwe ik ami c •nstanily pa'niu;. No ic nedy sjeavid attic to ilo me goo 1,1 usid a groat many. I. also sulferod fr mi headaches & <li:'.zine-s. Tlu headache prevented me from getting proper re-t at night, thin T felt tired out in thu j morning, I could not band my back or s'oop tj pi...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING SUGGESTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

L ^DAIRYING SUGGESTIONS. ;Uluf; following suggestions are- the experience of Mr. W. M. ltider, of the Winona Agricultural College, U.S.A.:. ' Test your berd for economic produc tion.1 , 1 . . .. Weigh milk from each cow night , and morning, one day each month. . .. •Take"samples of each milking and , test it for butter fat. Knowing tlie milk and fat given in one (lay. use these figures as an aver age day's production for the current month, .and, 'by 'multiplying the milk and fat produced (by the number of days iti the month, you obtain the total amount of milk and butter fat (in ■pounds) produced for one month. Weigh feed fed on day of test, and from the cost of each feed figure the' cost of feed ted each cow on day of test. From i he daily cost of feed per covr, compute the cost of her feed for one month. ' If the milk is sold as unilk, compute the value of each- cow's milk' for the' month- at the market price received. Knowing the money value of each cow's milk for the month, andt...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Show Dates, 1914. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

I ■ : : Show Dates, 1914. Dalyston—Wednesday, Feb. '1, '14 Lang Ling, Wednesday, Feb. 11, '14 Kocumburra, Wednes., Feb. 18, '14 LsoDgatha, Wednes., Feb, 25, 1914 Foster, Wednesday, March 4. 19144 Bunyip, Wednesday, March 11, '14

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. WHY WASH THE UDDER? [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 15 January 1914

DAIRYING" WHY WASH THE UDDER? There are many points in clean dairying which, if observed closely, would obviate milk contamination, and consequent complaints about in ferior cream and butter. Here are some points of advice: Washing the cow's udder is fre quently necessary. Should the pad dock in which the cows have been accustomed to lie down during the night be not clean—very few are clean enough—then the udders should be washed before milking. Cows for aging in unclean places, especially during drought, render washing their udders imperative. The cow-yard is usually muddy in some degree during wet weather. As tlift cow walks to and from the bail she generally makes a beaten path, and when wet this track becomes a continuous manure track. The, cow kicks up on to the udder pieces of. this contaminated soil, and the udder; is thus unclean when milking time begins. r :* The milker's hands are often a fruitful source of milk contamination during the operation' of mi'lcing. The damp, di...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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