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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THREE-YEAR-OLD PIANIST. UNTAUGHT INFANT PRODIGY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THREE-YEAR-OLD PIANIST. UNTAUGHT INFANT PRODIGY. We shall be curious to hear, says the "Golden Penny," what becomes of the remarkable musical phenomenon presented by Professor Charles Ric- let at the Congress of Psychology held in Paris. This prodigy was a little boy of three years and a half of age, named Pepito Rodrigues Ariola, still dressed in petticoats. When only two years and a half old, so the story goes, his mother, an excellent musician, heard some one playing on the piano which she had just left and closed. She had been executing a piece of classical music, and had gone into the adjoining room, when suddenly the instru- ment began to repeat the air and accompani-   ment she had been playing. Her surprise became still greater when she discovered that it was her baby, the little Pepito, who was repeating from memory the notes he had heard a few minutes before. From that time on the mother's decrepit old piano became his daily and inseparable com- panion. The yo...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOTHER AND CHILDREN. BURNED TO DEATH. IN SIGHT OF HELP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

MOTHER AND CHILDREN. BURNED TO DEATH. IN SIGHT OF HELP. Judd-street, King's-cross, London, was re- cently the scene of a destructive and fatal fire, a shop and eight-roomed house being gutted and a mother and her two children burned to death. The victims were Mrs. Annie Wilder, 25; Thomas Lewis Charles Wilder, 4 years; and George Henry Wilder, aged 4 months. The house in which the fire occurred consisted of an oil and color man's shop (belonging to a Mr. Salmon and conducted by a manager) and three floors above, let out to separate families. Mrs. Wil- der, with her husband, a blacksmith, and two children, occupied the top floor. The fire spread with such rapidity that half the place was soon ablaze. The occupants of the first two floors above the shop managed to escape. Mrs. Wilder, beaten back by the flames, went to the top window, and, holding her baby out at arm's length, shrieked madly for help, and implored those in the street below to save her and her children. Some constables...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE POST-OFFICE. NOT AT ALL NEW. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE POST-OFFICE.     NOT AT ALL NEW. Cyrus, King of Persia, possessed a regular   riding poet, stations, and men with horses that   were always in readiness when required. The speed of his horses was such, according to   Herodotus, as nothing mortal surpassed, and   varied on the road from Susa to Sardis from 60   to 120 miles a day. The early Greeks and Ro-   mans were by no means so advanced, the Greeks having but little private correspondence before   600 B.C., while few attempts were made to or-   ganise the postal system of the Roman Empire   until the Emperor Augustus instituted couriers   and stages along the roads at which relays of   horses were always ready.   England was even still more backward, for it   was not until the reign of Henry I. that perman-   ent messenge...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ORIGINAL SAM WELLER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE ORIGINAL SAM WELLER. One of the greatest novelists of the last cen- tury, says the "St. James' Gazette." whom no- body, of course, would think of calling a copyist, drew most of his characters from living folk. Sam Weller lived, it is almost certain, on the stage before he lived in a book, and for all the world knows, we may owe the "Pickwick Papers" to a Mr. Samuel Vale, who acted the part of Simon Splatterdash in a farce known as "The Boarding House." Everybody knows that it is almost impossible to secure one of the early numbers of the "Pick-   wick Papers," but everybody may not know that the scarcity is due to the fact that only 400 copies were printed of the first part, and that before the fourth issue the publishers thought seriously of stopping the book, which was issued at a loss. In the fifth part, however, Sam Weller came into being, and entered on a career which made his name immortal. Sam saved the day. The original "Sam" made the stage ring with his wi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Australia and B.P. THE SWORD OF HONOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Australia and B.P.   THE SWORD OF HONOR. General Baden-Powell, smiling, a little tremu-   lous, evidently feeling the honor very deeply,   was presented on the afternoon of November 6   at the Imperial Institute with the golden sword   of honor subscribed for by the people of Austra-   lia as a token of their admiration for his gallant   defence of Mafeking. Mr. Chamberlain pre- sided, and around him were several of the Agents-General for the Colonies, including Sir Walter Peace, who re- presents Natal in Lon- don. Sir David Tennant, of Cape Colony, and the Mr. Henry Copeland, the Agent-General for New South Wales, who made the presentation. In the course of his remarks, Mr. Chamber- lain said:— "This ceremony is a reminder to all of us that in the great struggle in which we are still unfortunately engaged we do not stand alone, that our kinsfolk throughout the world have made common cause wit...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BALLARAT BURNING FATALITY., PECULIAR CIRCUMSTANCES. A WOMAN AND HER HUSBAND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

BALLARAT BURNING FATALITY. PECULIAR CIRCUMSTANCES.   A WOMAN AND HER HUSBAND.     A peculiar and shocking burning fatality oc- curred at Warrenheip, a small township near   Ballarat, Vic., on Sunday morning last. The   victim, says "The Age" account, was a young   married woman, aged 25, named Mary Jane   Donovan, wife of Michael Donovan, a laborer   engaged at Coghlan's brewery in the township,   The couple, with their only child, and George   William Butler, brother of Mrs. Donovan, lived   in a small cottage in the main thoroughfare,   known as North-road. On Saturday Mr. and   Mrs. Donovan were in Ballarat, and imbibed   shandygaff. On reaching home, Donovan also   visited the Brewery and Tap Hotel, where he   says he had more shandygaff. On going to bed,   he l...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISSED THE LAST TRAIN. CURIOUS BILL OF EXPENSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

MISSED THE LAST TRAIN.         CURIOUS BILL OF EXPENSES.   Mr. George E. Wilkins, of Albert-road, Croy- don, launched the following bill of damages   against the South-Eastern and Chatham Rail- way Company at the Southwark County Court recently, on the ground that he and a lady friend had lost a train owing to being misdirected by the company's servants:— Damage to suit by rain in walking home £1 15 0 Damage to books by rain in walking home 5 0 Doctor's bill 5 0 Extra nourishment 10 0 Compensation for illness 4 0 0 Compensation for inconvenience and dis- comfort in walking home 2 15 0 Unused tickets 1 8 Total £9 11 8 Mr. Wilkins is a traveller. On June 30 he and a lady arrived at Charing Cross Station at 10.50 p.m. and booked to Croydon. He was, he said, wrongly told what platform the train would leave from, and the consequence was he missed the train which was the last that night. It was a very stormy nig...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BEADY FOR THE CORONATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

READY FOR THE CORONATION". Although it wants nearly eight months before the Coronation takes place, some of the larger hotels have already received applications for accommodation for that time, and among others it is stated the Hotel Cecil has already let all of its rooms for the Coronation period. If this be true, it will be no surprise, seeing that this large hotel enjoys many special advantages over its rivals. It has now completed its imposing frontage in the Strand, and the management intend to let out the front as shops, offices, and chambers. If the hotel is pushed for space dur- ing the Coronation, it could easily fit up tem- porarily that portion of its premises which is to be let for business purposes for the accom- modation of visitors. House agents also are inundated with applications for houses, flats, and apartments for next season, which promises to be the most brilliant that London has seem for many years.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ORDER OF THE GARTER. THE KING'S NEW BANNER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

ORDER OF THE GARTER. THE KING'S NEW BANNER. The Royal banner which King Edward, as Knight of the Order of the Garter, will soon place in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, has just been completed by the Royal School of Art Needlework, South Kensington. It is now ready to take its place amongst the banners of former Knights of the most celebrated European Order. The banner has been made from the richest velvets and cloth-of-gold, and its general ap- pearance is of much regal beauty. A few modifications upon the design of that of the late Queen Victoria were sanctioned by the Heralds' College, and the Irish harp on its Royal blue ground is shown in genuine Celtic form, which dispenses with the suggestion of a femi- nine mythological figure. The Scottish lion ram- pant on its field of gold follows the outlines of an early representation in the Talbot Arms in the possession of the College. The English lions are modelled from those on the shield of John of El- tham in the Abbey of Westminster...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COMPLETE SHORT STORY. MY FIRST OPERATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

COMPLETE SHORT STORY. MY FIRST OPERATION. Professor X. was the clinical instructor in surgery at the—School of Medicine, Vienna. He     was at once the boldest and most successful sur- geon the school ever possessed. It was my first term, and I was as hardy as football, swimming, rowing, and riding could make me. The first day we met in the theatre   the Professor singled me out from a score of new men. "You are English I perceive by your splendid physique." "No, Australian." "Ah! It is all the same. You have a robust health." When he had satisfied himself he slapped me on the chest, and exclaimed "You have the heart what you call as sound as a bell." After this he was ever observing me with eyes which seemed to have a hungry look in them. One winter's afternoon I was on my way to my lodgings. I had just turned the corner of —strasse, when a hand was laid on my shoulder.   I turned my head. It was the professor. "I have a case this...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANTIQUE TREASURES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

ANTIQUE TREASURES.       Among some of the "Things of Most Price In   the British Museum," described in the November "Strand," is the "Codex Alexandrinus," one of the three great codices of the world. The manu- script is now bound in four volumes. Three of them contain the Septuagint Version of the Old Testament, in an almost complete form, while the fourth volume contains the New Testament, with, however, "several lamentable" defects. It is in quarto form. The value of the Codex is said to be at least half a million sterling. Another treasure, the "Mainz Psalter," the second book known to have been printed that bears a date, is valued at £5000. The books printed by Caxton, the father of printing in England, represent to the Museum a fortune in themselves, seeing that the "Recuyell of the Historyes of Troy," the first book printed in the English language, is valued at £2000, and might fetch £3000, as might any of the Caxtons mentio...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHO ARE THE CLEVEREST? FAIR PEOPLE OR DARK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

WHO ARE THE CLEVEREST? FAIR PEOPLE OR DARK. There seems to be an abiding fascination about   anything which attempts to judge the character   of people from outward appearances. Foremost   amongst these devices in the past, and even now,   are the lines on the hand. Latterly the shape   of the ear and the lines on the feet have been   resorted to for the same purpose. Perhaps, the   latest method, however, is the color of the skin.   A recent investigator in this direction comes   to a conclusion as to fair people and dark. It   is clear, he says, that a high index of pigmenta-   tion, or an excess of fairness, prevails among men   of restless and ambitious temperament, the san-   guine, energetic men, the men who easily do-   minate their fellows, and who get on in life, the   men who recru...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY DOES SOLID IRON FLOAT? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

WHY DOES SOLID IRON FLOAT P This question, which has puzzled a good many   observers, was satisfactorily explained by Dr.   Anderson in a recent paper read before the   Iron Institute, London. When a piece of solid   iron is thrown into a pot of molten iron or steel,   the solid metal at first sinks, which shows that   its volume is less than the melted metal. But   soon the solid piece becomes heated, which   causes it to expand, its volume is increased, and   it rises and floats on the surface of the molten   mass. The action is the same both with iron   and steel.   The experiment has frequently been made by   throwing a piece of iron into melted steel. It   could be seen to go down, and it might be   thought that it was on account of the impetus   which the iron had attained...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA. POSSIBILITIES OF SETTLEMENT. NOT FOR THE CHILDREN OF TO-DAY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA.         POSSIBILITIES OF SETTLEMENT. NOT FOR THE CHILDREN OF TO-DAY. These are the general conditions—a physical   situation which must be laced by settlers in South   Africa. But there are still further considerations   in the question of South African development.   The settlement of new countries and the increase   of population in old countries by immigration are,   to a considerable extent, matter of competition,   says Albert G. Robinson in the "Forum." Few   immigrants go out wholly in the dark concerning   the conditions to which they go. A vigorous   booming might land hundreds or even thousands   of settlers in South Africa. Their success or   failure would soon be advertised. Others pur-     posing to leave their homes f...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ORIGIN OF THE FAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

ORIGIN OF THE FAN. The origin of the fan in China is said to have   sprung from the following incident:—A Royal Princess, very beautiful, was assisting at the feast of lanterns, her face covered with a mask, as was usual. The excessive heat compelled her to remove it, and in order to guard her features from the common gaze she moved it quickly to and fro in front of her face, thus simultaneously hiding her charms and cooling her brow. The idea was at once adopted throughout the King- dom. Catherine de Medici carried the first fan from Italy ever seen in France, and in the time of Louis XIV. the fan, covered with jewels, was worth a small fortune.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MR. GLADSTONE'S MARRIAGE. A FASHIONABLE AFFAIR. SIX HUNDRED WEDDING PRESENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

MR. GLADSTONE'S MARRIAGE.     A FASHIONABLE AFFAIR. SIX HUNDRED WEDDING PRESENTS. The marriage of Mr. Herbert Gladstone, M.P., to Miss Dorothy Paget, daughter of Sir Richard and Lady Paget, in St. Andrew's Church, Wells- street, on Saturday, November 2, was witnessed by a very large number of people. The church was beautifully decorated with masses of lilies and chrysanthemums, and tall palms. Shortly after 2 o'clock the bride made her appearance with her father. She wore a white dress glittering with silver, with a long train of old Flemish lace. The Rev. Ste- phen Gladstone performed the ceremony, assist- ed by the Rev. Harry Drew and the Dean of Lin- coln, while the Bishop of Ro- chester delivered an address. Lady Paget held a reception at Queen Anne's gate, and among   MRS. H. GLADSTONE. those present were the Duke and Duchess of Somerset, the Duke and Duchess of Wellington, Lord and Lady Spencer, Lord and Lady Cobham, Lord and Lady Tweedmo...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SLEPT FOR TEN YEARS. REMARKABLE EXPERIENCE. OF AN AMERICAN GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

SLEPT FOR TEN YEARS. REMARKABLE EXPERIENCE. OF AN AMERICAN GIRL. No other human being, so far as is known, has spent so great a proportion of the past ten years in sleep as has Miss May White, of Stockbridge (U.S.A.), the patient victim of a disease that has manifested itself in this sur- prising fashion. Day after day this unfortunate woman spends motionless in her invalid chair, hopefully await- ing the return of the bodily vigor of which an accident deprived her just eleven years ago. In this interval Miss White's longest period of unconsciousness has been 127 days—from June 29 to October 28, 1891. During this protracted time the sleeping girl lay in a state that was all but death. So heavy was the spell that lay upon her that only the most violent stimulants could arouse her sufficiently to take each day the nourishment necessary to prolong life. The sleep was absolutely dreamless, both mind and body succumbing to a frozen rigidity. At length, when her family had practically des...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CAUTIOUS GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

CAUTIOUS GIRL. Percy—I proposed to Isabel on a lovely moon- light night. Guy—Well?   Percy—She said to bring the matter up some   cloudy night; that she didn't want matters to stand so I could blame the moon if we made a bad match.—Detroit "Free Press."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INTO THE UNKNOWN. STRANGE METHODS OF SUICIDE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

INTO THE UNKNOWN. STRANGE METHODS OF SUICIDE. The rope, the revolver, the river, and the gas-jet are traditionally the most approved methods of severing one's mortal connections with neatness and despatch. There are many other more ex- traordinary fashions of accomplishing suicide, however, which the amateur criminologist has taken little note of. Doubtless a perverted sense of the grotesque leads some men to choose start- ling ways of self-destruction. In other cases it is simply a question of choosing the implement near- est at hand. Some 20 years ago a Boston man determined to guillotine himself. He constructed an apparatus by which a heavy axe blade was held in place by a can of water. In the bottom of the can was a hole which allowed the water to run slowly out, and when a certain amount had escaped the axe blade was liberated. The suicide laid his head on a support so that the axe would strike him in the neck, and placed a dish of ether in such a position that he would inhale ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PROFESSIONAL SHOPPERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

PROFESSIONAL SHOPPERS.       Professional shoppers are employed by a cer-   tain large firm of drapers in London to test   the abilities of shop assistants. This firm owns   over 30 large shops, and employs nearly 1000   assistants. To find out whether every customer   is politely served, a number of lady customers   are employed to call at the various shops. They   are told to give as much trouble as possible, and   sometimes to leave without making a purchase   after looking at nearly everything in the shop.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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