ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Columbia Daily Spectator Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,990 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
658,475 results
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, JANUARY 15th, 1878. No. 8. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief, J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. C. H. CROW, 78. H. G. PAINE, '79. W. B. PARSONS, JR. 79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - 82.00 Single copies, - - - - ~ 1 5 cts - Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. EXAMINATION will have begun before our next number reaches our readers. Cram-week remains abolished, and accordingly, we expect to see a tailing off in the standard of the examination-papers. Whether this will, however, be the case, remains to be seen. The immense pressure of business and college duties during this month will, we hope, induce our readers to excuse the irregular appearance of this and the following number. Though we have striven with all possible energy to keep " on time,' the examination without cram week fairly upsets our arrangements, and we must apologize. To all of our collegiate readers, however, we cordially wish success in the coming ordeal, and hope none will be found, at our Semi-An-nual, on the Bth prox. to bewail "flunks" or "conditions;" and in this connection we throw out the hint that our students should not, in justice to themselves, allow this year's Semi-Annual to fall behind the usual standard. Cheerful payment of the tax, (wisely r...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CRIBBING. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

CRIBBING. DON'T study ; crib. The advantages which accrue to the cribber are such as no sensible student can afford to ignore. The successful cribber always gets a mark above the average Protessors and tutors alike smile upon him, while his class-mates, being rather behind the scenes, laugh significantly when he recites, and afterwards clap him on the back and applaud him as a smart fellow. True, at first a qualm or two of conscience will annoy the tyro at cribbing, but be not discouraged at that; with a strong curb you can very easily set aside your conscience, and alter awhile the curb can safely be exchanged for a plain snaffle. Besides the advantages already enumerated, the cribber has much more time at his disposal than the hardworking student. He can go out with his girl every night to study astronomy, while his lean and studious class-mate must stay in doors and " pole " Greek and mathematics by himself. He is generally a favorite with the other and fairer sex, who invariably...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
LETTERS TO A FRESHMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

LETTERS TO A FRESHMAN. NO. LI. My Dear Boy SINCE last I wrote I have heard very good accounts of you in society, hut am sorry to see that you stand at the foot of your class. Something is necessary to be done soon. Your personal appearance must be improved, because " virtue seldom shines in a rusty coat." Although you are averse to it, you must carry a cane, just for the sake of looking well to the professors, and increasing your marks. Assume a nonchalant appearance and you will soon be thought to be related to a trustee. I think you will look very fine if you let your moustache grow, and beware of smoking, lest you burn the delicate ends off and pi-esent a ragged appearance. In order to see its growth, apply to any dealer in telescopes. I think your compositions are very good. I suppose that accounts for your low standing. It is all right in that case ; for if you get to writing for the press you can afford to sacrifice marks, home, political influence and everything. Send your pr...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

CORRESPONDENCE. Mr. Spectator: — CONSIDERABLE misapprehension exists* as to the length of time required in learning our lessons at Columbia. As there are many students, like myself, living out of town, I give a statement of what happy times we have, and how long we "play.' The figures are those of the several professors themselves : Per Day. Traveling, 4 hours. Meals and preparation 2 hours. Greek with dictionary 3 hours. Thirty pages Constitutional Law. . . 3 hours. Twenty pages Political Econpmy. . . 3 hours. Philosophical Essay 1 hour. Stopping to mend furniture broken in hurrying for trains 1 hour. According to the laws of health, after each meal before studying, x / 2 hour. i l / 2 hours. Copying notes on Physics, etc y 2 hour. Sleep 5 hours. Total 24 hours. Tell me, my dear SPECTATOR, where the time comes in for writing and reading on the lite ot Aaron Burr, etc. Where are the hours for auxiliary study, etc. If a student stands well I think the above figures are not at all exa...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
FOOT-BALL RECORD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

FOOT-BALL RECORD. THE summary of the sixteen intercollegiate football matches which have been played this season, between October 23 and December 8, shows that eleven clubs have competed therein, whose "records" when reduced to the lowest terms stand as follows Amherst defeated Tufts; Stevens defeated Rutgers and New York College twice each (though the first Rutgers game was technically a draw) ; Columbia defeated Rutgers and Stevens; Harvard defeated Columbia, McGill, and Tufts; Princeton defeated Harvard and Columbia ; Yale defeated Stevens, Tufts and Trinity and played a draw game with Princeton. Hence Yale retains the championship, which was won last year in the following way : Harvard defeated McGill and " All Canada; " Princeton defeated Pennsylvania University in two games and Columbia in one, and Stevens also defeated Columbia; after which Yale swept off the accumulated honors in three successive games, defeating Harvard, 1 to o; Princeton, 2 to o, and Columbia, 3to o. Last ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ATHLETIC RECORD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

ATHLETIC RECORD. AT the autumn meetings of last year the records required at the respective colleges in making the 100 yd. run were as follows : Columbia, ioj^s.; Harvard, Princeton and Dartmouth, io 3 Ts.; Rochester, ; Amherst and Michigan, lis. ; Wesleyan and Williams, 11 Xs.; New York City, The corresponding record of last spring was as follows : Princeton, 9fs.; Pennsylvania, ios. ; Dartmouth, io^s.; Harvard, lis.; Columbia, Rutgers and Amherst, At the spring games of St. Paul's School, N. H., the record given for the quarter-mile run was S°X s -> which is more than a second better than the best accredited time in recent Oxford-Cambridge meetings. • I MILE | MILE HIGH"" I RUN " ' RUN. RUN. RUN " WALK - J UMP " Columbia .ro 4-5 .57 2-5 2.15 3-4(5.16 7.4 4-5 5.3 Dartmouth xi .62 2.14 i-2 ! 5.32 1-28.3 1-2 4-8 New York 11 1-4 2.55 Pennsylvania.. . 10 1-2 .61 x-4 2.22 1-45.38 9.7 1-2 4. 11 1-4 Rutgers 11 .67 1-2 9.13 1-4 4. 10 Tufts 11 1-2 .61 1-4 2.15 15.23 1-29.23 1-24....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. THE Finance committee for the student's SemiAnnual is as follows : Cheesman, \ , s Foster. \ , Schell. f 75 ' Paine, f 79> sfr I' 8 -- THE class of '79 has elected the following Columbiad committee : H. A. Kingsbury, Chairman, E. D. Runk, Poet, W. B. Parsons, Jr., Treasurer, D. M. Hildreth, C. E. Cornell, W. C. Ford. THE Columbia Ball took place on the 16th of January. Considerable interest was manifested in it and a fair number of tickets have been sold. All the money will be given to sending the crew to England. PRESIDENT BARNARD read an essay during the holidays. ALL the $4 subscriptions for removing- the debt of the boat club are now called for, the requisite $BOO having been subscribed. A. J. BURTON, '79 was a winner of one of the heats in the 440 yds. dash at the recent N. Y. A. A. games at the Hippodrome. Messrs. Hammond and Eldredge were assistant judges of walking at the same place. THE crew are beginning work at the gymnasium. Capt. Goodwin, R. R....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

IN "THE MINES." MANY improvements were made during the summer and fall, but the cry is "still they come.' The fittings of Prof. Newberry's room, next the lunchroom, are rapidly acquiring shape, and will soon be ready for use. There are rows of drawers about the room, from floor to ceiling, many of which are already filled with specimens, and in the middle will be tables and benches very much as in the blow-pipe room. As stated in our last issue, examinations in geology and palaeontology will be conducted here in much the same way as are those in mineralogy. THE doors at the entrance of Dr. Chandler's suit of rooms are universally blessed. There is a fine, strong swing to them that makes it particularly pleasant when they come in contact with the back of one's head. Up to date we have heard of but one professor who has been butted by a student rushing unexpectedly through them, but daily expect to receive more names. THE lumber at present piled up in the yard is designed for a frame ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Peithologian Society. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

Peithologian Society. THE regular meeting, Jan. nth, 1878, was called to order (thirteen members present), Vice-President Hallock in the chair. Wm. H. Roome delivered a select oration. Mr. Chas. O'Neil, 'BO, read an essay upon the " Tyranny of Fashion.". Debate.— Resolved , That students of medicine should be required to be graduates of some recognized college. Messrs. Carlisle, Chamberlain and Robb debated in the affirmative ; and Messrs. Roome, Hallock and Foster in the negative. Decided as to the merits of the question in the negative ; and as. to the merits ot the debate in the affirmative.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD Brown:— But four speakers presented themselves at the Junior oratorical exercises in the chapel recently. " Honors were easy," there being just one apiece lor them, and yet it was not a very inspiring beginning. Harvard:— A new gymnasium is about to be erected. The building will begin in March. It is probable that the payment of Mrs. Severs's bequest will be deferred for one year. The Nine ask this year for a larger subscription than usual. The extension to the Library, together with the new heating apparatus, cost $90,000. Yale:— New Haven is to be favored with a series of three s\ mphony concerts, by Theodore Thomas' famous orchestra. No opportunity is offered to the undergraduates of working at the Art School except in leisure time. Music Teacher : " Well, miss, can you read and sing at sight ?" Miss : " Yes, but not right off, the first time." It has been suggested that in future concerts the Glee Club sing behind a screen to counteract the unfortunate tendency...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. THE North American Review begins its new volume and New York existence with a very readable, though not particularly strong number. Senator Hoar reviews Senator Sumner s memoirs. John Fiske writes on Immortality. W. W. Story has a very good paper on the Origin of the Italian Language. Bayard Taylor writes on Ephesus, Mycenae and Cyprus. Gen. MacClellan criticises the Russo-Turkish war, and Mr. Marble writes on the Silver Question in the same obscure style which distinguished his editorials in the World. As will be seen from this enumeration, the Review must be read by any one wishing to keep apace with current events, and cannot be neglected by a thoughtful student. Messrs. D. Appleton & Cos. now publish the Review, and it has rather improved in appearance. The Nineteenth Century for January is the best number of this best of reviews that has yet appeared. It contains, besides other articles of great value and importance, a beautiful lecture by Ruskin, "A ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SOCIAL CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

SOCIAL CULTURE. AS a class, students are prone to be unsocial. By this we do not mean that each one lives only for himself, and seeks no other company than can be found in books, for this can hardly be said ; but his social turn of mind is in a direction peculiarly collegelike. He meets with his companions daily on the best of terms, and often converses with them in their several rooms. The theme of conversation generally turns to college incidents, —some victory or well-sus-tained defeat in foot-ball, or other matters of similar import. If a subject of graver consideration is introduced, it is received only for some quick or amusing misinterpretation which someone is eager and ready to put upon it. If this trivial way of looking at and thinking of things could be easily laid aside, no serious results would follow. Like all habits, however, by long indulgence it acquires such a control of its possessor as to be an absolute injury. As he endeavors to work his way into the business el...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE GOLDEN CROSS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

THE GOLDEN CROSS. ""-pis a weary, shadowy age of a time, -L Since the evening bells pealed out their chime ; And down on the dunes, by the glittering sea, My John was wandering on with me. He was strong and tall, was my sailor boy,— My own heart's hope, and his mother's jov ; But the work was ready, and so was he, And we wandered on by the rippling sea. Then as we gazed on the far, far blue, Where the sky and sea are no longer two, There rose in the lurid, shivering haze, Such an unusual, bright, marvelous blaze. That shaped itself in a cross, as high, As high as the very height of sky. Then John stopped short, and said to me, — " There never was mariner lived to see His home again, when the cross has shone.' And my heart grew cold at his deep, sad tone. So the sun sank down, and the sea was glass, When my darling John said, " Now, my lass ! " And he kissed me thrice as he whispered low, — "We shall never meet on the earth below." Then the days rolled on till they grew to years, And...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

THE LIBRARY. THE CYCLOPEDIA OF EDUCATION. A Dictionary of Information for the use of Teachers, School Officers, Parents, and others. Edited by H. Riddle, and A. J. Schem. New York. 1877. E. Steiger. Price, $5.00. The book before us is one of the few books published during the past year, that will, in a revised form, be in use and in demand a half century hence. Being the only work of its kind in the English language its usefulness at present cannot be disputed, and the general spirit in which it is edited makes it clear that the editors and the publisher mean to make it a permanent standard work. Of a size with a volume of Appleton's or Chambers' Cyclopaedia, the book contains a great number ot articles on subjects connected with Education, and justice requires us to say that they are, on an average, much better than similar essays in other works of the same character. The practical character of the work indeed, is what gives it by far the most value. It is a "book" for every teache...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 January 1878

SHAVINGS. WHEN dressed for the evening the girls now-a-days Scarce an atom of dress on them leave. None blame them. For what is an evening dress, But a dress that is suited for Eve. A HUGE bear has been traveling the streets in a barouche, with a big notice, "Champion Wrestler." There is trouble bruin for the strongmen of New York. " What is Boyle's Law?" '• Never to trump your partner's ace." The Ponca Indians have received their Ulster overcoats. They put their legs through the sleeves, all right, but what in the name of goodness to do with the rest of the coat, they didn't know, and they never will find out. " The Japanese have no cuss words in their language." After seventeen futile attempts to get the joints of a stove pipe to fit, the indignant Jap goes out and bumps his head against a post, kicks a hairless dog twenty-seven times around the yard, and then —feels better. The cleverest of Comedians, Florence, made his debut in the humble capacity of a watch-dog. He had to bark ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, FEBRUARY est, 1878. No. 9. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B , Editor-in-Chief, J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B- 0. H. CROW, '7B. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - B - PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79. Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, 15 cts. Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. THE first term of the present college year has at last been brought to a successful close. Begun with many improvements in the course of study, it ends with the necessity for many more. First of all, we notice to our regret that Greek yet remains a required study for all those Seniors who do not care to take Calculus, while it continues impossible to study both Latin and Political Economy. This absurd and pernicious abuse should now be corrected. We do not care to reiterate all the well-known arguments for the change, but we merely ask the faculty and the trustees what possible good can come from a study looked upon with ineffable loathing by nine-tenths of the class. It is rank nonsense to answer this by pointing out the "great value of Greek." The fact is: twenty out of twenty four students in the section loathe the study, and endeavor to get along with as little study as possible, and to pass the examination as narrowly as circumstances will permit. How is this de...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Henley Regatta. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

The Henley Regatta. THE trip to England has lately been the topic ol much discussion. Cornell has even taken the trouble to "protest" against our going as champions, and articles have appeared in the daily papers, stating that it would be " unfair" for Columbia to row as the representative of American colleges. All these critics seem to have mistaken the facts of the case. Columbia certainly could not go as the representative American rowing college, for the reason that she is not the champion at present. Neither has anyone, in Europe or here thought of such an action on the part of our crew. Our representatives go to Henley as the crew of Columbia College, not as the champions of America. If no other American college sends a crew, our men will certainly appear in a quasi representative character, but this can only be the case if no other crew is present to share in the honors of representation. Hence there is no more need of a protest against the race between Oxford and Columbia, t...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A NEW CONGRESSIONAL SONG. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

A NEW CONGRESSIONAL SONG. (To be sung after an all-night session on the Silver Bill). OS AY can you see by the dawn's early light The swindle we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming, Whose cuteness and cheek through the perilous fight Kept us up to the mark with our dodges and scheming; And the bondholder's glare, looking on in despair, Gave proof through the night that our best hold was there, — O, say does our fraudulent standard still wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the knave ! And where are the fools who have thought it a spec To lend their spare cash on the word of the Nation, Who thought Public Conscience would keep us in check, And we hadn't the brass to spell re-pu-di-a-tion ! They are skinflints and Jews, and their gold they must lose. And the National Honor may go to the d-euce For the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the knave ! O, thus be it, even when creditors stand Demanding hard money and penny for ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
x
Loading...
x
x