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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

pr'i 'pm" iiwi,'Mii)iiwytpwHM"1'-' "j;rrvifi'Mvwr-r"'-wi!''i'r4W' THi? INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 Church, but refusing all the overtures of a higher civilization. They are repre sented in the Legislature by a special delegate, whose duty it is to present any grievances they may have, though he is not allowed to vote. They have a school conducted by Sisters, and before the church door stands a statue of the Blessed Virgin, the Patroness of the community. On Easter Sunday fifteen of ourlndian pupils received their first Holy Com munion. Oh, what a beautiful sight! Our readers will please pray for the perseverance of their dusky proteges. Some unknown person sent us the "Boston Investigator" of December 27-, 1893, with the request: "Please read thoroughly. Will Advocate answer this?" She or they had marked with pencil thirty-five columns of closely printed matter of the vilest stuff, almost each word of which is a lie, and calls for an indignant refutation. But this is an old trick of the "fa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

38 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Pope says that narrow-souled people and narrow-necked bottles are alike, for the less they have in them the more noise they make in pouring it out. The most egotistical of the United States, "Me.;" the most religious, "Mass.;" most Asiatic, "Ind.;" father of states, "Pa.;" most maid enly, "Miss.;" most musical, "La.;" best in time of flood, "Ark.;" most astonishing state, "0.;" most un healthy state, "111.; " state to cure the sick, "Md.;" -state for students, " Conn.; " state where there is no such word as fail, "Kan.;" not a state for the untidy, "Wash." Rev. Father Anthony, of Roveredo, Italy, a Capuchin, invented and manu factured a steam motor destined to revolutionize the present method of locomotion, by which all the compli cated machinery now in use is discarded and supplanted by a most simple and economical arrangement. Father An thony went to Rome to submit his invention to the government and secure a patent. St. Anthony's Messenger. Another monk as...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

Qtttz Gbatholxc (btonvdj in the iCttttefr gttccte HOFFMANNS' CATHOLIC DIRECTORY, the Official Directory of the Catholic Church in tho U. S. (published by Hoffmann Brothers Co., Milwaukee, Wis.), has furnished us advance sheets of the forthcoming Directory giving tho following statistics, showing the growth of tho Catholic Church in tho United States. GENERAL SUMMARY. 1 Clergy. j ,. Secular I Regular 3 .'3 T " gf ' s J Archdiocese ami Dioceses. -J c ri J go I I S So jP S I s n S g 1 BALTIMORE 1 1 147 241 388 167 11C 3 4 00 8 260 8 18 90 21235 8 8i3j 30 2G 200 233 OU) Charleston 1 16 2 17 22 CO 3 3 6 722 2 125 3 1101 8 000 Richmond. 1 31 2 33 45 40 9 3 C 23 2 458 3 100 5 3 713 22 000 St. AtlgUStlllO 1 1C 8 24 25 84 1 10 21 2 030 1 ill 1 2 1GC 13 000 Savannah 1 io 12 31 24 50 6 12 J4 1200 3 150 0 2 030 20 000 Wheeling 31 4 35 70 48 C 1 C 14 2 191 3 95 4 2 843 20 000 Wilmington 1 25 C 29 37 17 14 2 9 2 000 3 202 3 2 300 20 000 North Carolina 1 g 0 18 25 40.. 1 10 1 9 1 3 11 CCS 2 .... 2...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

4.0 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TO-DAY. Lord, for to-morrow and its needs, I do not pray; Keep me, my God, from stain of sin Just for to-day. Let me both diligently work And duly pray, Let me be kind in word and deed, Just for to-day. Let me no wrong or idle word Unthinking say, Set thou a seal upon my lips, Just for to-day Let me in season, Lord, be grave, In season gay : Let me bo faithful to Thy grace, Just for to-day. And if to-day my tide of life Should ebb away, Give me Thy Sacraments Divine, Sweet Lord, to-day. In Purgatory's cleansing fires Brief be my stay; Oh, bid me if to-day I die, Go home to-day. So for to-morrow and its needs I do not pray; But keep me, guide me, love me, Lord, Just for to-day. ST. JOSEPH. St Joseph is the Patron of a happy death. Rev. Father O'Hare, missionary in South Africa, relates the following: "During my residence of twelve years in Africa, I had charge of a territory as large as all England. From time to time I visited my scattered flock. On one of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4-1 death, and now you see to-doy St. Joseph sends mo a priest.' " "I remained over night with him, prepared him, hoard his confession, and the next morning gave him the Holy Viaticum, and shortly afterwards anointed him, and gave him the last blessing. Soon after he died, and the last prayer that fell from his lips was, 'St. Joseph, obtain for me the grace of a happy death.' " All hail ! St. Joseph, heav'nly blent, Who with thine arms didst Christ caress, Give uh a share of that pure love Which brings the soul to God above. THE REAL LAUGH. No one who laughs heartily and wholly can be altogether irreclaimably bad. How much lies in laughter! The cipher key, wherewith we decipher the whole man. Some wear an everlasting barren simper; and in the smile of others lies a cold glitter as of ice. The fewest are able to laugh what can be called laughing, but only sniff and titter and snigger from the throat outwards; or at best, produce some whining, husky cachinnation, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

w THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. pression, "Oh, my God, I .am truly sorry for my sins," is enough. The next time is the most important, "Thanksgiving to the loving Father for His goodness to us;" and the last thing is an earnest act of Supplication to Ilim to help us in all things. This is all; it is so simple and yet so powerful with God, that everyone should practice it. It is suitable for all classes the nobleman, the merchant, the clerk, the laborer, the woi'k girl, the mistress, the servant girl, the beggar at our doors all can join in Spiritual Mass. They have but to remember what the Holy Mass really is, the renewal of the awful Sacrifice on Mount Calvary, when Jesus Christ, the Son of the Living God oifered Himself, true God and true Man to His Heavenly Father, on behalf of us sinful creatures. Those who practice this devotion once will find by the wonderful gifts and blessings that come to them, by the sweet and holy peace that falls upon their souls, that hearing Mass in spirit is m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

wypptyjg 'ppWgBiy!tBWP-wyw " "TTn THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. AS facts in life namely, that one is liked by any person according as one presents a likeable appearance to that person. Nothing can prevent the operation of this natural law. It is no good your urging that you are the father, mother, brother, sister, husband, or lover of the person by whom you wished to be supremely loved. If you are not love able to him or her, all argument, all exhortation, all passion is thrown away which is intonded to produce love. You can force the outward show, but not the inward feeling. A jealous person will exclaim: "Why don't you confide in me?" The real answer is: "You are not a person to be confided in;" and all claims to confidence come to nothing when confronted with that important fact. Jealousy is, therefore, the peculiar vice of stupid people. A deep thinker, or one who has a reasonable amount of self-respect, will not yield to it for a moment. ST. PATRICK'S CROSS. Come, raise me up, alannah ;...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. nonsense." What, then, can bo your reason? It must be something of mighty import, when you, a Catholic, neglect all your Catholic obligations because of it. "On the contrary, the proverbial mouee, born of the mountain's labor, is greatness compared with my ideal off spring: Once I had a difference with a priest!" For this you risk your eternal salvation! You take chances that are likely to eventuate in your finding your self in hell ! You break God's law, scandalize your neighbor, and hurt and harm no one but yourself ! Verily, the amputation of one's nose to spite one's face must have something most specially satisfying when so many make the experiment. HOW WE LOST CANADA. There is little doubt but that our country to-day would have remained a portion of the British empire had it not been for Irish and French Catholics, who watered our soil with their blood. It was undoubtedly owing to the inter meddling of the Colonial Congress in the religious condition of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

.,.,mm ,.'i wi'wpwuf jyniuiiiiiiiiq.iiiiwjniiniowMVWi !T.H77 INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4.5 TlMz V2el ofjpurgatory. how many svi:i:t HKMINISCKNCKS THIS TlTLi: KKCALI.8 TO A CIUUSTIAN MINI). EASTER FOR THE HOLY SOULS. Though deep in tearH and gloom they Ho, They still shall burst their prison, As truly as the morn shall dawn, And Christ again he risen. As truly as the sons of earth Shall each to each declare, That while the sun dispenses light Ilia death sweet fruit shall bear. For man, redeemed still dreams of Heaven As his own Fatherland, By Christ uplifted from despair Led by His gentle hand. And thus as Hope can soften death, Out casting every fear, "Will Faith and Love on Calvary born, Bring the departed near. Some day the weary path they tread Will change to streets of gold, "With banners on the walls of pearl Fold dropping light on fold. "Why weep one tear for them whose feet Have touched the farther shore, "Why covet them through pain and death "Where Christ has walked before. Let joy ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

4.6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. to her sisters in religion the following very remarkable words in regard to this subject: "When I wish to obtain any grace of our Lord, I appeal to the souls in purgatory to ask Him in my name, and by their intercession I obtain whatever I desire." "She even assures us,' says St. Liguori, "that she obtained in this way many graces which the intercession of the saints did not procure her." St. Bridget testifies that she heard a voice from purgatory pronounce this prayer: "Lord, my God, deign in your infinite power to reward a hundred fold those on earth who are mindful of us, and try to hasten for us the hour when the light of Thy countenance shall shine upon us and we can contemplate your adorable features." Revelations. The Blessed John Baptist Mary Vian ney, the saintly Cure d' Ars, in France, and of our own time, twenty days before his death said to Father Serres who founded at Nismes a pious confraternity for the souls in Purgatory: "Oh! if people only k...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4-7 be acquired hero and bestowed hero after, does not bind under any pain of sin. But that it is an act most accept able to God and our Mother of Mercy, may be judged from the warm approval which the Church extends it and the great privileges which the Popes have accorded to it. The Heroic Act of Charity was first enriched with indulgences by Pope Benedict XIII., afterwards by Pius VI., and lastly by Pius IX.. in a decree of the Sacred Congregation of Indulgences September 30, 1852. The privileges conceded to this noble act of self sacrifice are the following: 1. The Indult of a privileged altar personally every day in the year, to priests who have made this offering. 2. A Plenary indulgence, applicable only to the faithful departed, to all the faithful who have made this offering, whenever they go to Holy Communion, provided they visit a church or public oratory, and pray there for the in tentions of our Holy Father the Pope. 3. A plenary indulgence every Mond...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

4.8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. plenary indulgence which a person who has made the Heroic Act will gain by receiving Holy communion, or by hearing Mass on Monday0, need not be placed at the disposal of the Blessed Virgin, but may be applied to any poor soul whom the donor may wish to aid. Lastly, that a priest who has made the "Heroic Act" and is using the privilege of an Altare Privilegatium must apply the plenary indulgence gained thereby to the soul of the person for whom the Mass is offered It may be objected that in thus de priving ourselves of all the indulgences to be gained during life and of all the suffrages to be offered foi us after death, we are preparing a long term of purg atory which must be undergone alone and unaided. In reply let us say that this grand act of charity is in itself of such value before God that it is sufficient to blot out all the temporal punishment due to our sins, as well as to send, perhaps, thousands of souls to enjoy the beatific vision. The lives of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

The Vol. VI. AN INDIAN BENEDICTINE. Few of our readers, perhaps, are aware of the fact that the first Bishop appointed for America, after Columbus's discovery, was a Benedictine monk, i.e. a son of St. Benedict. Bernardo Bola, or Buyl, was his name In the fr. decree of erection by the Pope Alex ander VI., we road those re markable words: "Since the Order of St. Benedict is the first and most ancient, and has given to the Church so many confessors and martyrs, and to Europe so many apostles, since Franco, England, Germany, Switz erland, Russia, in fact the entire old continent, are indebted to that Order for their faith, it is just that it should have the honor of giving the first Bishop and Apostle to the New World." Thus was Bernar do Bola, or Buyl, a Benedictine monk of Montforrat, made first Vicar-Apostolic of the Indies (the name then given to America) . Did you ever know this fact of history, dear reader ? And now, after this little introduc- Wlontferrat, the greatest Benedictl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

50 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. MOTHER AND SON Good-hy, then you're going, my darling, Away from the home of your youth, Fnr away from innocent gladness, Away from its faith and its truth, The world with its joys and its pleasures, Alas! they are lighter than foam; Yet these are the troubles that draw you Away from your mother and home. Ah! well, it is but the same old story, The tendrils which cling to our life, Must ever be breaking and bleeding, And tangled and torn in the strife. Good-by then, dear boy, and believe me, Wherever your footsteps may roam, My love is still watching, forgiving, And waiting to welcome you home. You speak of the great and the noble, The tempter that tempts you in Fame; You would climb up its mystical ladder, And would gild with its tinsel your name, Wake, my darling beloved, you're dreaming, You need not a wanderer be, In our cottage we're peaceful and happy, Stay at home, dear, and share it with me. You cannot? you will not? farewell, then, Your visions must ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 51 to despise honor, morality and modesty, the great and noble virtues of domestic life, to place vice in honor and present it under the most seductive colors this seems to be the aim of the novelist and the other writers who deluge the city and country with their unclean and trashy works. How is it possible for a mind or heart to remain pure after reading those pages in which there is only question of intrigue, deceit and all the refinements of degrading and de basing passions ? It is a well-known fact that many go so far as to neglect their duties even the most important that they may follow those infamous narratives to the end. These pages exhale a poison which is certain death to all who road them, a poison which is so powerful that no virtue can resist it. Whatever may be said of the evils produced by bad reading, there are some who will employ pretexts, more or less suspicious to justify them in reading everything which may fall into their hands. Wo must n...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

p'yr jtjggl' 'JMMWJggjgg 50 TfZ77 INDIAN ADVOCATE. "p- " "TWPr, Father Stephan says, that the mpst vehement of tliose who demand the secularization of Indian education are to be found among the most narrow class secretaries, and that their insist- ance upon the secular theory of education is not ingenious, but is only a cloak for ulterior designs of practically sectarian character. He believes it to be the universal judgment of all competent persons who, have been brought in contact with the Indian problem that its solution in re spect of Indian civilization is impossible upon a strictly non-religious basis. To civilize the Indian, to awaken and vivify his moral nature, he must be brought to an understanding of the existence, the power, the omnipresence, omniscience, and the perfect justice and goodness of the Supreme Being. Some sort of religious education becomes necessary to the Indian, as a basis upon which to rear a fabric of general knowledge, sufficient to qualify him as a me...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 58 bors, and, as stated before, tho charity of Catholics for such purposes has al ready reached the important sum of $1,500,000 and over. If the amount paid for the support and education of Indian children in Catholic institutions appears large in comparison with amounts paid for the same service under other denominational effort, it is only because the Catholic community has used its charity, zeal and organization in response to the invitation and avowed policy of tho Government to a more liberal extent than have others. If one individual boards, feeds and clothes 150 persons at the rate of $3 per week, while another does the same for only 25 persons, is the first obnoxious to public policy because his allowance amounts to $450, while that of the second is only $75 ? The argument of our enemies is a ridiculous one. A ROYAL GODFATHER. Charles X., King of France, and brother of Louis XIV., when at St. Cloud in summer, was in the habit of walking frequently to Vil...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

w&m&sk 64. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. you will be pleased with her; she is a pretty girl, eighteen years old. You will bo proud to have her walking with you." And thus speaking fchejr came to a little house. The good woman told her relations how she had found a god father for her child, and they compli mented her on her good fortune. Some of those present thought they had seen him before. c So they walked to the Church, the king giving his arm to the pretty god mother; and every one said: "How lucky the wife of Jean-Paul is to have found such a godfather for her child!" When the cure came to the baptis mal font, he was astonished at the undressed suit of the godfather, though he noticed his refined manners. "It is not the custom," said he to his beadle, " for a gentleman to come to a baptism in an undress suit, but it does not matter much." And he began the holy ceremony. When the baptism was finished, and the gospel of St. John had been read over the head of the child, they all w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 55 JUDGE NOT. Judge not! Thou canst not tell Why he, thy brother fell. Wilt, too, thy flowers might, Exposed unto the blight; Thy singing birds quite dumb, 'Neath darkened skies, become. Judge not! Thou dost not know Why he has acted so. lie not so sure, thy grain Could long resist such rain; Thy bark, thus tempest tossed, Might not the bar have crossed. Judge not! Thou canst not say Just where the blame to lay. From strings long snapped in twain Comes out the sweet refrain; From streamlets frozen deep Not soon the waters leap. Hid not from that poor heart The one last hope depart ; lint, judging, questioning not; The past all, all forgot, Let silence be the gem Of mercy's diadem. WHAT WILL YOU BE? Wo see two boys standing side by side. Both are intelligent-looking and kind-looking; but one becomes an idle, shiftless fellow, and the other an in fluential and useful" man. Perhaps when they were boys no one could have seen much difference between them; when they w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

56 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. These are the noble heroines so out rageously maligned and slandered by bigoted Protestants and infidels. This is the revenge those noble victims of persecution took for the wrongs inflicted on them. Christian charity will shine before the world in spite of all that infidelity can do to obscure it. DON'T WAIT. If you've anything good to say of a man Don't wait till he's laid to rest, For the eulogy spoken when hearts are broken Is an empty thing at the best. Ah! the blighted flower, now drooping lonely, Would perfume the mountain side If the sun's glad ray had but shone to-day And the pretty bud espied. If you've any alms to give to the poor, Don't wait till you hear the cry Of wan distress in this wilderness, Lest the one you forsake may die. Oh hearken to Poverty's sad lament! Be swift her wants to allay; Don't spurn God's poor from your favored door, As you hope for mercy one day. If your heart be sickened with sin's affliction, Don't wait to receive sweet...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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