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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

THE INTERVIEWER. Corn in the Orchard-C. P. Wilcox's Ex periment with Early Minnesota Dent- How to Plant and Cultivate-The Or chard the Gainer-Irrigating—Yield per Acre—Valuable Hints to Owners ot New Orchards. A great many people now arriving in the "arid btlt" hail from the com growing states. Very naturally one of the first. questions arising in their minds is, Can we grow Indian corn here? The universal re sponse i«, Yes, of course. Bat, huve you tried it? U not so often answersd in the af firmative, for the fact is that most ranchers can do so much better with some of the specialties that little dependence is placed upon corn. But the corn and b icon fed man does not take stock always in cripi about which he knows little. He will come to it gradually, but it is best to let him take his time to get acclimated and to ontch the venturesome spirit by actual contact. I thought it would be n good idea to tell these new comers, these; believe) s in the in fallibility of corn as a stapl...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

ro UNDER THE DITCH. The Irrigation Market pr« nts its esti mate of the acreage now cultivated by moans of irrigation west of the 98th meridian at the close of 1893: Under Under Works for Cultiva- Ditch. lion. Arizona 650,000 400.000 California 5,500,000 3,800,000 Colorado 4,000.000 2,000.000 Idaho • 1,500,000 375,000 Kuiiiim 800.000 125,000 Montana 1,500.000 400,000 Nubnwka 350,000 100,000 N, vada ... 200,000 100.000 New Mexico 00J 000 400.000 North DakolH 15 0 0 5,000 Oklahoma. 10.0.JJ Oregon 800.000 120.000 South Dakota 125,000 75,000 Texas •••• 400.000 185,000 .-..,;. " ' 750,000 430.000 Washington 1.000,000 200.000 Wyoming 1,500,000 200,000 Totals 18,000,000 9,025.000 To these totals it mtiy be conservatively estimated that surveys are being made, funds in process of raising, and other steps arc taken for the reclamation of at least 10,000,000 acres more. The survey of the Kittitas Middle ditch lias been delayed by deep snows. Guv. McConnell of Idaho is taking an active interest...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

POULTRY RANCH. r Our Poultry Editor !■ Harry H. Collier. No. 1)50 C St., Taooma. Addren aim on allFoui try matters.] ABOUT DUCKS. ISy E. M. 0. A great many people, when they see my Hock of dncks, ask with an air of surprise, "Do you think clucks are profitable?" while others inform me with the most profound nssurance, "Oh there is no money in ducks; yon can't get anything out of them." Of course, I think they are profitable, or I would not be railing thorn. lam not rail ing poultry for the fun of it, not being blessed with enough of the "necessary" to permit me to indulge in hobbies or fane es of any kind except for the money that may be gotten out of them Ducks are easy to raise, requiring very little care, and not being subject to so many diseases as young chickens are. They re quire a good, warm house with a tight, dry floor, which should be kept clean. Their feed should consist of boiled potatoes mixed with steamed cut hay and some chopped meat. Give them very little graiu. Tur ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

12 THE HONEST OLD TOAD. Selected. Oh, a queer little chap is the honest old toad, A funny olil ft How is he; Living under the stone by the side of the road, •Neath th* shade of the old willow tree. He is dressed all in brown from his toe to his crown, Save his vest, that is silvery white; Ho takes a loritf nap in the heat of the da;', And walks in the cool, dewy night. "Kiuip, yanp!" says the frog From his home in the bog, But the toad he say* never a word; He tne.s to be t?ood, like the children who Should Be seeu, but never be heard. When winter draws uettr Mr. toad goe» to bed, And he sleeps as-sound as a top. But when May blossoms follow soft April showers, He com- B out with a skip, jump and hop; He changes his dress only once 1 confess— Every spring; and his old worn-out coat, With trousers ami waistcoat, he rolls like a lull And stuffs the whole thing down his throat. "K-rruk, krruk!" says the frog From his home in the bog, But the toad he says never a woid; He tries to he go...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

wns a prisoner. The battle raged furious ly, but Kalooas, caring nothing for dan ger* rapidly forced bis way to the lodge where he knew the rose was confined. Be retched it, entered, and with a glad cry clasped the form of Natcba to his breast. Meantime, those of the villagers who were able, had lied, LaLoom among them, and the Yakimas, after tiring the village Bet out on their homeward .jour ney laden with booty. Ere half the journey had been accom plished, however, the scouts brought in word that Lahooni and the KlicUitat chief, Tecolekun, were in hot pursuit with a vastly superior force. These gloomy tidings lent increased speed to the victorious Yakiinae, but their jaded horses could not hope to escape the fresh mounts of the Kliekilats, and at the foot of the cliffs on the "Blue Water" they came together in a death struggle. Ka looas, bearing Natcha in his arms, awaited the issue of the battle, which he soon saw was pgainst him. At each stroke of the wat hatchets a life was sac...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

14 A BUSHEL OF CORN. As it Looks Eroir. the Tripod of an Illinois Newspaper Man. Barring the fact that that the writer faili to note the harvest ol misery and death—the devil'a profit in one branch of the business—the following from the Peoria Herald is a very truthful tracing of a bushel of corn from cultivator to consumer. It is ;i most wonderful show ing: More corn ie used in Peoria than in any three cities in the Union, even though those cities be New York, Philadelphia and Chicago. The reason is obvious. Peoria is not only the center of the great distilling interests, but here arc located two of the greatest sugar housei in the country. Down the capacious maws of the great distilleries are poured every day 20,000 bushels of corn. The sugar houses use from 5,000 to 10,000 bushels more each day in the year. To supply this demand the product of 1000 acres of rich corn lands are duly shipped into Peoria for home consumption. Aside from these 5000 bushels are used daily for other pu...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

INCREASE YOUR KNOWLEDGE. It is a good thing to use n large amount of common tense in onv application of advice which we rend or hear in regard to the care of fowls. Now everybody who keeps only ;i few hens, common or otherwise, is apt to think he knows a good deal more about their culture than he actually does know, and be is almost always ready to impart this knowledge (?) to any othere engaged In the same pursuit. If you arc. a constant reader of poultry papers which publish all the latest news about the way to raise poul try, and especially if you have really acquired a good deal of knowledge ou the subject, this becomes very exasper ating, and your Impatience is hard to re strain at times. One of my neighbors has a flock of common fowls— seventy hens and three cocks, which are allowed to run all to gether. They run all over the farm at this season of the year, lay in the barn or under it, among the bushes or in the chicken house— wherever they like. The eggs are sometimes fertil...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

16 Prosser Falls Irrigated Lands Ist. There is, on account of the great growth of the country trlb'"^ to Proper Palls adomandjr U^mSSJSSSu M the^out time. When fully completed ii will Irrigate 70,000 acres <>! lilM(1- , ro , lllllbla « vste m of canals that will irrigate 75,000 acres, throwing open to with a sp,en did Wte, Power for m a m ,r»eU,r,n ß ditch lrrlgtUe ; acre sof choice land, Wb »nbttlldliig a P«mplngpant way and will be ready for the next Irrigating lewon. *«™ run by water and will deliver 15,000,000 gallons Thta plant law* mcK ; i o ; _x *k d d food 000 rtoouii treatment a place w^r«^^^ his i>ni timt ht> has bought tlie prol y> ur h^ksn^yssis&i^&s^^t^^^^^-'^^ •« w)miioscd of honorable "usiness men> who have records well earned for clean work and square dealing. ~„♦-„ fll . u t am nur main efforts will be to settle and develop the country tribu tary^VroL^FKbelievS^batC^^ Und no trouble in selling; our lots will later sell them selves. To parti...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. I. NO. 13. PROSPECTS. At those numerous horticultural so ciety meetings being held week by week over the northwest —or ought to be wherever they are not, and every Saturday afternoon at that—there are some topics that may not and will not be downed without great loss to the greatest and most important interest of the section. These are the insect pests, present and prospective; pack ing and packages; methods of ship ping, and co-operation in marketing through shipping associations; can neries and evaparators. Don't, don't, as you value your business, don't ne glect to organize a shipping associa tion that shall gather daily informa tion about markets, secure reliable handlers of your goods in each market center, adopt uniform packages, and work generally for the promotion of the common good of all the members. In no other way, by no less care, prep aration and thorough organization, can we ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

2 fixed low rates for passengers and freight, it should be easy to secure a portion of the capital required from the ranchers along the route. In time the other valleys centering at North Yakiuia will also be penetrated in the same way, and the trolley poles could and probably will eventually carry wires for the transmission of power for general factory purposes, and for small manufactories at home. Electric railways in country dis tricts,with the corresponding low rates of passenger fares and freights, are meeting with great success in the east, where hundreds of miles are being built regardless of hard times. In deed, perhaps because of the hard times, when people see more forcibly the necessity of low expenses and quick transportation in order to make the most of every opportunity, of ev ery effort. Right in the most thickly tracked railroad districts of New Eng land, where eastern railroad fares are 2 to 2/4 cents a mile, there the electric railways are building the fastest and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

and also that the increased acreage in his neighborhood will be less than talked of some weeks ago. He thinks very highly of the Yakima valley as a hop country. Mr. Campbell bought about 1,000 bales here last year, but says that the quality ef last season's crop was less prized in the London than in the New York market. Ow ing- to replanting in many yards, some of the hops were cured too green for the Britishers. He anticipates a more uniform qualiy this year. North Yakima Lumber Market. Rough and sized, per M $ 13 (X) No. 2 flooring aud rustic 1(5 00 No. 1 flooring and rustic -0 00 Po. I finish 20 00(« 24 00 Lath 2 60 Pontf», each 10 vVood, per cord 4 00 North Yakima Graitt Markets. Following are th« prices paid to tanners: \\ heat, No. 1, per bushel 50 Wheat, No. 2, per bushel.... 40 Corn, per bushel 50 Barley, per ton $13 00(« 15 00 Oats, per ton 17 <X»@2o 00 The prices at which milling produce is sold are as follows: Flour, hard wheat, 501b sacks 1 00 Flour, patent grade, 501...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

4 THE INTERVIEWER. Fruit Inspector D. M. .lessee Talks for the Benefit of Fruit Growers—Sound Views of Orchard Care—lnsect Pest Warfare— A Test Case-Washington's Opportunity. I accidentally caught on to Hon. D. M. Jessee, state fruit inspector and member of the Washing-ton state board of horticulture, the other morning. He was on his way to the train for Tacoma to attend the regular semi-annual meeting of the board on Monday of the present week. I thought it a pretty good opportunity to get a glimpse of the fruit situation as it looks to a man who spends much of his time among fruit growers, and who is in a position to know a great deal about conditions and prospects for the season of 1894. This is a year of great horticultural activity, I ventured to remark by way of "making- talk." "Yes," was the reply; "the most ac tive season in tree planting, by far, that the state has ever seen." Is orchard planting- very g-eneral throug-hout the state? "Yes; but the greatest extension is bein...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

Relinquishments^ First Class Homesteads and Desert Claims Located. Arddess A. BYERS. KIONA, WASH, or A. H. DAWSON, Uottstein Building, Seattle. live WANTED GROWERS ■ X 1 j-^j^ Who know what they want. They will find it in my stock of A 1, XXX fruit trees and plants of all the best varieties. Catalogue free. Quick service. T. R,. HOPKINS 2nd and University Sts.. SEATLLE, WASH. \ ~ A.C. FRY &CO., Commission Merchants, -DEALERS IN— Green and Dried Fruits, Vegetables, Butter, Cheese, Poultry, Veal, Hogs, Honey. Hay and Grain handed in car load lots on small commission. Consignments and corre spondence solicited. References: Mer chant's National Bank, Plckens, Fulton & Co. 998 West St., Seattle, Wash. r) nn All One Year Prune Trees AllooS Vcat For sale at low prices and first class stock and true to name. Shipped with certificate of Inspection FRENCH PRUNES No. 1, 6 to 8, ?20.00 per 1000 No. 2, 4 to (i, $15.00 per 1000 No. 3, 3 to 4, $ 10.00 per 1000 ITALIAN PRUNES No. 1, (i and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

6 YAKIMA BEETS AT THE FRONT. By direction of the secretary of ag riculture, the department at Washing ton last year sent packages of sugar beet seed to about 350 experimenters, representing forty-three states and territories. Of the 2,428 packages of seed thus distributed this state received 250—next to California the highest number of any state. The department also sent to each re cipient of seed a bulletin giving de tailed instructions regarding the prop agation of tht beet plant, how to plant the seed and cultivate the beets. It was also expected that each plant er would furnish the chemist of the department samples of his crop for analysis. Only 283 samples were sent on, however. Of these 199 were ana lyzed at Chicago during the World's fair, and the remainder were tested at the laboratory at the department. One hundred and fifty-two samples from this state were analyzed: The bulk of them were sent from Whatcom county. Only two were sent from Yakima county. These were sent by Ju...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

2, John R. Reavis; No. 3, E. B\ Benson and A. B. Ely. For special on law pertaining to ir rigation, and report on climatology, H. S. Blandford. It was resolved to proceed immedi ately to collect all pertaining data and shape the work of the commission. Meeting adjourned to meet at Walla Walla on May 4, 1894. EVERYBODY WANTS IT. Though They Don't All Say So Yet. Should be in the hands of every wide awake,progressive farmer, irriga tor and citizen of the Yakima valley— The Ranch, published at North Yaki ma. The Ranch is a weekly paper, de voted purely to agricultural matters. It is ably edited by E. H. L,ibby, who recently located in North Yakima, coming from the east. experienced and thoroughly well posted in his line of work. From the very start he has shown us what he could do —for he has made The Ranch the best agricultural paper published in the west. Every farmer should read it carefully every week; and when we say farmer we mean every one in the Northwestern states, from Britis...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

s THE RANCH. Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It Price—sl.oo a year in advance. Worth—Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. H. LIBBT. Managing Editor, W. W. Cokhett. Published by the YAKIMA PUBLISHING COMPANY. EDITORIAL OFFICES: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. business offices: North Yakima, YakimaiAvenue. Seattle, Boom 7, Hinckley Block. Tacoma, 1113, Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. Did you plant trees yesterday? If not, have an Arbor Day of your own before "the sap goes up." A London paper says that $50,000, --000 worth of fruits are annually im ported into the British Isles. Every cool day now lessens the lia bility to fruit-killing frosts when the buds are bursting into bloom. If you are the possessor of a fruit tree don't fail to read what Inspector Jessee had to say to The Interviewer as reported in this issue of The Ranch. The farmer who has wheat on hand will do well to give another twist to the string- of his grain bags, if there is anything in President Van Horn's predicti...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

WAYSIDE NOTES. The Old Peach-failure Chestnut— Don't be Too Sure—A No. 1, XXX Effort Demanded all Along the Line—Cherry Trees for Shade Instead of Poplars, Tramps and Huns Figured ln~Fr»lt Trees for Shade and Ornament in Town. By an Old Sagebrush Rooster. Years ago, before I began crowing among the sagebrush of Old Yakima, I lived more or less all the way between the Rockies and the Atlantic. And I remember that every spring the crack of that old chestnut was heard, that there was "a total failure of the Dela ware peach crop." But I noticed that just as regularly every fall those great baskets came out from the Chesapeake country, running over with great, blushing luscious fruit. That total failure croak was a part of the stock in trade of the Delaware peach grower. Now, I don't want to intimate that they haven't had a sort of brief glacial period all the way from Long-horn Texas to Short-norn Illinois, that has knocked the stuffing out of many fruit buds, and that will cut short th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

to IMPROVE YOUR STOCK. When one picks up the poultry pa pers published in and around Missouri he will see a paid advertisement of the Armour Packing- company advising farmers to improve their stock by buy ing' good male birds of some of the larger breeds, such as Wyandotte or White Indian game. Recently Mr. Armour paid a visit to his Kansas City house. In going through the poultry department in the cold storage build ing- his attention was called to a con signment of very fine looking chick ens, which he was informed one of the breeders of fancy poultry in that city had sent in, being three dozen Wyan dotte culls. Mr. Armour ordered them packed in three different consignments and sent to as many commission houses in the three largest cities in the east, viz., New York, Philadelphia and Boston. They were labled "prime poultry." On these shipments he re alized 3 cents a pound more than he did for mongrels. That suggested the advertisement above mentioned. In the advertisement he offer...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

Bozeman is to be the seat of the ag ricultural college of Montana. The ground for the college building was the gift of a public-spirited citizen. The people united in securing a farm of 160 acres for the experiment station, and plans are being drawn for the sta tion building. This building will ac commodate the director and horticul tureprofessor, professor of agriculture and botany, the chemist, veterinarian, etc. Montana begins late, but she will get there all the same, and may avoid several breakers by profiting by the experience of other states. The San Jose scale and the green aphis are the insects most commonly found on the fruit trees of this city. On Monday morning we noticed a sprayer at work in the grounds of P. J. Flint. We were informed by George Klock, having the sprayer in charge, that he had found the scale upon two of the apple trees. Mr. Klock was ex- Seed Potatoes for Sale. Burbanks. Good quality. J. W. Sin dall, at F. and T. Co-Op. Store, North Yakima. EGGS for sa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 14 April 1894

12 THE SUN-KISSED LAND. [The author of the following stan zas did not say so, but without doubt the great Inland Empire was meant:] There snow-covered mountains like senti nels stand, As if guarding the booty they've won; Those valleys that lie iv the new "prom ised land," The "fair land that is kissed by the sun." The flowers lpnd their fragrance, the trees lend their shade, To the rivers which peacefully run Where all seems combined in a paradise made, In "the land that is kissed by the sun." A foretaste ot heaven is revelled in there, Truest worship of nature begun, And men seem more gentle, and women more fair, In "the land that is kissed by the sun." Then pause, weary wanderer, rest here awhile! Thou may'at dream that thy day's work is done; For nature will cheer the bruised heart with a smile, In "the laud that is ki3sed by the sun." HOW A HERO PERISHED. The Story of the Lonely Grave Near Old Fort Simcoe. W. 11. James in Spokane Review. Several miles from old Fort Simcoe, wher...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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