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Elephind.com contains 344 items from Soldiers' Journal, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 15 June 1864

The City of Richmond. Richmond by the last census, had a popula tion of 38,000 souls, but the great influx of civil and military officers and refugees from other parts of the State has probably raised it to a much higher figure. It is situated at the head of tide-water, at the lower falls of James river, about 150 miles from its mouth. The city occu pies a most picturesque situation, being built on Richmond and Shockoe hills, which are separ ated by Shockoe Creek, and surrounded by beautiful scenery. It is regularly laid out and well built, the streets, which are lighted with gas, crossing each other at right angles. On Shockoo Hill are the State Capital and other public buildings. The Capitol is an im posing edifice, and contains in its central hall Houden's celebrated statue of Washington. On the east of the square is the Governor's mansion. Jeff Davis' residence is a private mansion, which was purchased for him by the rebel Govern ment. The city has many fine public buildings, si...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 15 June 1864

gressman who aided and defended Preston Brooks in his assault upon Senator Sumner, was killed at the battle of Cold Harbor. He was a Colonel in the rebel army. Brooks died some years since. General "Baldy" Smith is a Pennsylva nian, and a graduate of West Point. During the Mexican war he was a captain in the regular army and was noted for his " dash " and brav ery. From some cause or other he lost most of his hair from his head when young, and there fore obtained the soubriquet of " Baldy," which has clung to him to the present. There is not much news that can be relied upon from the alleged Morgan raid in Kentucky It is now believed, however, that the first reports were greatly exaggerated. A Cincinnati dispatch says that Gen. Burbridge whipped the marau ders at Mount Sterling on Thursday. On Friday morning some of them made a descent on Lex ington, burned the railroad depot, robbed a few stores, and changed their base. Burbridge is after them. U. S. Sanitary Commission. ITMENT OF ...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

THE SOLDIERS' JOURNAL 18 PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY MORNINO, AT? RENDEZVOUS OF DISTRIBUTION, VA., RECENTLY CONVALESCENT CAMP, VA., ON THE FOLLOWING TERMS : Subscription for One Year, - #2,00 " " Six Months, - 1,00 Single Copies, - - - - - - Five Cents PAYABLE INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE. POSTAGE ON THE JOURNAL is Twenty Cents a year—payable quarterly, in advance, at place of de livery. —■—^—^——p————^—^ jtfUrt _. From the Home Journal. A SOLDIER'S LETTER. BY EMALINE SHERMAN SMITH. [Tho boy-hero who is supposed to write this letter, is no creation of fancy, but a living and noble reality.— He belonged to one of the Vermont cavalry compan ies, and in his first engagement with the enemy re ceived the peculiar injuries mentioned in the poem.— He was less than eighteen years of age! yet he bore his terrible misfortune with a cheerfulness, heroism and manly resignation as wonderful as they were ad mirable. It Is pleasant to know that such a spirit "still lives," and shines forth from its mutilate...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

continued his preparations, many eyes filled with tears. We had no expectation of ever be holding him again, and our sorrow was pure and ( lasting. The hour at length arrived, and the lieutenant came forward to pilot him out to his lohely post. We shook his hand warmly, and then he left us, apparently cheerful. Slowly the hours passed away ; pale Luna cast a silver flood of light and sparkles of brilliant beauty around, and tho twinkling stars, like sparkling sapphires gemmed on high, spread a radiant splendor over earth. Sleep visited but few of us that night, as our thoughts were con tinually wandering to Bill and his expected fate. It must have been past midnight when the sharp report of a rifle was heard, followed by death-like groans. We all sprang from our rude beds, and hastened away to solve the mystery.— We pressed forward, each moment expecting to see the dead body of our friend; but we were agreeably surprised, on reaching the post, to find him not only alive, but as calm...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

First American Sea Fight. Within twenty years after the settlement of Plymouth, ship building and navigation began to occupy much of the attention of New Eng land, and as every vessel of any size carried many light guns, the navigation of the period had most of the characteristics of an armed trade. In addition to the ships and barks that crossed the ocean, many decked boats, or small sloops, were used on the coast, especially by those who dealt with the Indians for skins. The first engagement that probably occurred between inhabitants of the American colonies and ene mies afloat, was a conflict between John Gallop, who was engaged in a trade of this nature, in a sloop of twenty tons, and some Narragansett Indians, who had seized upon a small vessel belonging to a person by the name of Oldham, known to have been similarly occupied. As this, in a certain sense, may be deemed tho earliest sea fight of the nation, we consider it worthy to be related. Some time in May, 1636, Gallop, in ...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

C|e j&otta' $mmial. WEDNESDAY MOBSING, JUNE 22, 1864. B. A. CASSIDY, ------ Editor and Publisher. AMY M. BRADLEY, - - - Proprietor. OUB VOLUNTEER AGENTS. The following persons are announced as our agents at the places standing in connection with their names, and are authorized to receive subscriptions and con tributions for The Soldiers' Journal : Miss Amy M. Homans, East Vassalboro', Maine. Miss Mary P. Locke, Charlestown, Mass. Mr. W. M. Mellen, Boston, Mass. Mr. G. T. Crawford, Camp Agent. We still invite the co-operation of our friends every where, to increase the circulation and influence of our paper. Contributions, intended for publication, must be accompanied by the name of the author to insure in sertion. Advertising.—A limited amount of advertising in serted at ten for the first and five cents per line for each subsequent publication. The cash must accompany all orders. All Communications, and other mail matter, in tended for The Soldiers' Journal (except such as is pr...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

Ordnance Report. Ordnance Department, "> Rendezvous of Distribution, Va., > June 13th, 1864. J R. P. Crawford, Capt. & A. A. G.— Captain :— I have the honor to submit the following report of the manner in which the business of this De partment is conducted: The orders from the Colonel Commanding are that all men reporting to this camp shall, before boing assigned to quarters in the barracks, turn over to this department all arms and equipments in their possession. Each man receives a mem orandum receipt for the articles turned over, and at the same time duplicate receipts in the proper form are forwarded (by mail) to the com manding officer of the company to which the man belongs. A register is kept in which are entered the man's name, company, regiment, each article turned over by him, and the date of the transfer. The major part of the arms and equipments received in this manner are cleaned and repair ed here, and issued to men being forwarded to their regiments, or to g...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

SUMMARY OF ARMY INTELLIGENCE Wednesday, 15 th. Washington, June 13. Maj. Gen. Dix, New York: We have dispatches from the Army of the Po tomac as late as 8 o'clock this morning. The movement at that hour was in successful pro gress. No reports to-day from Gen. Sherman. Tho following dispatch from Gen. Burbridge, commanding in Kentucky, has just reached here: — " I attacked Morgan at Cynthiana at daylight yesterday morning. " After an hour's hard fighting, I completely routed him, killing three hundred, wounding nearly as many, and capturing nearly four hun dred, besides recapturing nearly one hundred of Gen. Hobson's command, and over one thousand horses. "Our loss in killed and wounded was about one hundred and fifty. Morgan's scattered forces are flying in all directions; have thrown away arms, are out of ammunition, and are wholly demoralized." Dispatches from Gen. Butler at 9 o'clock this evening indicate no change in his command. No further intelligence has been received from Ge...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

arrival, and .surprised, or, rather captured the very strong works northeast of Petersburg be fore sufficient force could be got in them by the enemy to hold them. He was joined the night following this capture by the 2d corps, which in turn captured more of the enemy's redoubts further south, and this corps was followed by ' the 9th, with the result above stated. All the troops are now up except two divisions covering the wagon trains, and they will be up to-night. The enemy, in their endeavor to reinforce Petersburg, abandoned their entrench ments in front of Bermuda Hundred. They no doubt expected troops jrom north of the James river to take their place before we discovered it. Rntler took advantage of this, and moved a force at once upon the railroad and plankroad between Richmond and Petersburg, which I hope to re tain possession of. Too much credit cannot be given the troops and their commanders for the energy and forti tude displayed the last five days. Day and night has been...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 22 June 1864

Examiner (which is issued on a half sheet only) of coarse and dirty paper, advertises the follow ing terms: The Daily Richmond Examiner is mailed at $50 per year, $25 for,six months, $15 for three months, and $5 for one month. The Semi-Weekly Examiner is issued every Tuesday and Friday, and sent by mail at $25 per year, $15 for six months, and $10 for three months. The Weekly Examiner is issued every Friday, and mailed to subscribers at $15 per year, and $10 for six months. The Examiner is published on the cash sys tem, and will not depart from it under any cir cumstances. Persons who desire to got the pa per will please accompany their orders with the cash. Advertisements will be inserted in The Daily, Semi- Weekly and Weekly at $2 per square of eight lines or less for every insertion. Carriers and news-dealers will bo furnished at the rate of $20 per 100. Persons sending subscriptions must do it at their own risk. There are at present four hundred paymasters in the army. The salar...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

THE SOLDIERS' JOURNAL, IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY MORNING, AT RENDEZVOUS OP DISTRIBUTION, VA., RECENTLY CONVALESCENT CAMP, VA., ON THE FOLLOWING TERMS ! Subscription for One Year, - #S,OO " Six Months, ---- 1,00 Hingle Copies, Five Cents PAYABLE INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE. POSTAGE ON THE JOURNAL is Twenty Cents a year—payable quarterly, in advance, at place of de livery. THE VIOLETS OP THE WILDERNESS. BY ETHEL LYNN. Softly and stilly the river ran, The full, low-singing Ripidan; Ths sunshine streamed like a golden tress Through tlie jungle-growth of tlie Wilderness; While the birds sang loud with a warble clear. As tho' no death-strewn held were near. But out where the longest shadows fell They should have sounded a mournlul knell, For strewn about by their silent guns Lay fathers dear, and motl ers's sons- Lay rebel caps, all dashed aside, And death-struck eyes, still opened wide, With many a gaping seam and cut Through heart and coat of butternut, Whence souls that we called rebel we...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

r> were about 12,000 on each side. The Americans lost 200 killed and wounded, the British about 300. In the battle of the Brandywine, Washing ton had about 11,000 effective men. Lord Howe About 18,000. Tlie British lost about 600 killed and wounded. The American loss was greater, but no exact returns were ever made. At Sara toga, perhaps the most decisive battle of the Rev olution, our force was 12,000, militia and regulars, and Burgoyne's not more than 6,000. At Cam den, Cornwallis, with a little more than 2,000 regulars, miscellaneous force bf 6,000. We lost 900 killed and as many prisoners; the British lost in all, 825. In tbe Revolutionary siege of Yorktown, the Americans and French were 10,000, the British 8900. During the siege our loss was about 300 killed and wounded, the British about 550. Of all these contests, thoseof Marathon, Arbela, Piirtowa, Blenheim,, Waterloo and Saratoga are ranked by Professor Creasy as among "the de cisive battles of the world." ii i m Thk Dka...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

Maximilian's Reception. In speaking of the arrival of the New Emper or of Mexico and the reception with which his subjects mot him, a correspondant of the New York Herald uses the following language: "In no wise did the subjects of Maximilian demonstrate any joy at his arrival. They were of course ourious to have a look at the imperial oouple, but beyond this were as calm and im passible as though born in those cold regions which gave his Majesty birth, instead of under the tropical rays of Old Sol. Even most osten tatiously polite where ladies aro concerned, the Mexicans on this occasion seemed to have laid aside their usual affability to the fair sex, as far as tho Empress was concerned. They stared at her, but gave no welcome. Shocked, no doubt, at this reception, their majesties hastened away from Very Cruz. They would not linger to par take in the festivities which the French had pre pared for them. Pretexting a fear of Yellow Jack, on went the imperial cortege to Soledad. Even...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

Cjie Journal. | WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 20, 1864. , R. A. CASSIDY, - ----- Editor and Publisher. AMY M. BRADLEY, - - - Proprietor. | ———^—i— SSSSSSSSSSS —™ i OUR VOLUNTEER AGENTS. The following persons are announced as our agents ' at the places standing in connection with their names, and are authorized to receive subscriptions and con tributions for The Soldiers' Journal : Miss Amy M. Homans, East Vassalboro', Maine. Miss Mary P. Locke, Charlestown, Mass. Mr. W. M. Mellen, Boston, Mass. Mr. O. T. Ckawfokd, Camp Agent. We still invite the co-operation of our friends every where, to increase tlie circulation and influence of our paper. Contributions, intended for publication, must be accompanied by the name of the author to insure in sertion. Advertising.—A limited amount of advertising in serted at ton lor the flrst and five cents per line for eacli subsequent publication. The cash must accompany ' all orders. All Communications, and other mail matter, in tended for The Soldiers' J...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

THE SOLDIERS' JOURNAL. LOCAL AND PERSONAL ITEMS. The Ordnance Department.—Accepting the invitation of Lieut. Charles F. Brown, in charge, we recently paid this department a visit and were kindly shown through and had its workings explained. Since the organization and equipment of troops have become a part of the business of the camp, this department has grown into an institution of the first importance, and the facility with which its functions are per formed speaks in the strongest terms of com mendation of the officer in charge. One of its most noticeable features is the labor of repair ing and rendering available arms that have become, from various causes, unserviceable, skillful mechanics being engaged constantly in this work, thus placing at tho disposal of the government arms which under ordinary circum stances would have to pass through a regular course of rebuilding at the Arsenal. Tho supe riority of American, over the arms of every other nation, is clearly demonstrated by ...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

SUMMARY OF ARMY INTELLIGENCE TliiiM-tiv, 3Jlrd. Washington, June 22—10 P. M. Major General Dix: Dispatches from City Point, at half past seven o'clock this evening, report no fighting. Movements are in progress which are not now proper for publication. The Richmond papers report an attack on Lynchburg, by Gen. Hunter, on Saturday, and that he was repulsed. It is believed, however, that there was nothing more than a reconnois sance, and that, buying ascertained the place to be strongly defended, Gen. Hunter withdrew, and is operating upon the enemy's communica tions at other points. A dispatch from Gen. Sherman's headquarters, dated yesterday evening at half-past 8 o'clock, states that "it has rained almost incessantly, in spite of which our lines have been pressed for ward steadily, and an important position gained by Gen. Howard. The enemy made a desperate attempt to retake this position last night, mak ing seven distinct assault* on Gen. Whittaker's brigade of Stanley's division, ...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

Our Subscribers.* Below will be found a complete listof our sub scribers, with their post office address :— CAMP. Surg. G. Li Sutton, in Charge Augur Gen. Hos. Dr. Regard is, do Dn Huselton, do Steward C. H. Phelps, do Steward L. Buck. do Sergt. A. Y. Hadley, do Major James Johnson, 14th Reg. V. R. C. Capt. G. Fernald, Co. A, do Capt. Harry Rockafeller, Co. B, do Capt. Mahonv, Co. E, do Capt. W. K. Haviland, Co. C, do Capt. W. Vanderlipp, Co; D, do Capt. A. A. Yates, Co. F, do Lieut. W. H. Burns, do Lieut. E. Fitzki, Co. B, do Lieut. B. Thomas, Co. H, do Lieut. A. C. Keel, Co. I, do Corporal D. FillbrOoke, Co. D, do Sergt. Major John Holmes, do Geo. W. Bingham, Co. H., 10th N. Y. Cay. Rev. Norman W. Camp, Chaplain. R. O. Bracket, sth Me. Vols. R. Garter, citizen. Mr. Gorbett, citizen. I. P. Baldwin. Philip Silbert. Mathew Tague. W. D. Pentland. Horatio Kuhn—2 copies. Wm. Jennings. WASHINGTON, D. C. President Abraham Lincoln, White House. Vice President Hannibal Hamlin, 250 F street....

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 29 June 1864

0. S. Sanitary Commission. DEPARTMENT OF "SPECIAL RELIEF," No. 389 II Street, Between Thirteenth and Fourteenth Sts., South Side, WASHINGTON CITY, D. C. SOLDIERS AND SEIIH Oan, at the above office, have the necessary papers made out, correspondence attended to, and ALL NEEDED ASSISTANCE FURNISHED IN REGARD TO PROCURING PAY, PENSIONS, BOUNTY, PRIZE MONEY, AND ARREARS OF PAY AND BOUNTY WITHOUT CHARGE. This work is done by men of ample experience, pos sessing all needed facilities. Each applicant for a pension should bring with him two persons able to make oath that they believe he is the person he represents himself to be. FOOD AND LODGIMf) Are provided for all men on sick leave, and to dis charged soldiers on their way from the army to their homes, at " Lodge No. 4," 380 H street, between Thir teensh and Fourteenth .streets, " The Home." 374 North Capitol street, (second house from rear of the railroad station, toward the Capitol,) "Alexandria Lodge," near railroad station, Alexandri...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 6 July 1864

THE SOLDIERS' JOURNAL, IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY MOBNI NO, AT RENDEZVOUS OP DISTRIBUTION, VA., RECENTLY .CONVALESCENT C-AJVEP, V-A.., ON THE FOLLOWING TERMS : Subscription for One Year, - $2,00 " Six Months, - 1.00 Single Copies, Ifive Oerits PAYABLE INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE. POSTAGE ON THE JOURNAL Is Twenty Cents a year—payable quarterly, in advance, ut place of de livery. WOUNDED. Let me He down. Just here in the shade of this cannon torn tree, Here, low on the trampled grass, where I may see The surge of the combat, and where I may hear The glad cry of victory, cheer upon cheer; Let me lie down. Oh, it was grand ! Like the tempest wo charged, the triumph to share; The tempest, its fury and thunder were there; On, on, o'er entrenchments, o'er living and dead, With the foe under foot and our flag over head; Oh, it was grand! Weary and faint. Prone on the soldier's couch, ah, how can I rest, With the shot-shattered head, and the sabre-pierced breast ? Comrades, at roll-call, when I ...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The soldiers' journal. — 6 July 1864

whole of Holstein, which contains no Danes at all, and some districts of Schleswig, in which the German element prevails, should be separated from Denmark, and made an independent State. The difficulty now is to find a frontier lino that will give general satisfaction. Different lines have been proposed, one by Austria and Prussia, another by the neutral Powers, and still another by Denmark. No understanding on this point had, according to the latest advices, been reach ed ; and warlike threats are again freely made in England, in case the wishes of the Danes should not be completely realized. But as the main point, a division of Schleswig, has been adopted by all parties, it cannot be so exceedingly difficult to come to an understand ing as to details. A Soldtkk.s Optnh>>t of Gkant's Campaign. —The Middleton (N. V.) Prcs-H publishes the fol lowing extract of a letter from a private in an Orange county regiment in Grant's army, while in front of Bichmond:— "We are enjoying our...

Publication Title: Soldiers' Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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