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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 February 1918

THE GLORY OF THE AMERICAN RE PUBLIC The Science of Government The Hope and Dependance of the Human Race Copyright 1917 By ORLANDO BELKNAP POND (All rights reserved) CHAPTER XIV. THE TWO GREAT EVENTS IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD. The endeavor to utilize steam as a mo tive power for transportation npon rail roads and the invention of the locomotive engine, comprehended only one branch ot the labor exerted by men to increase the opportunity and extend the means ot travel and transportation. Other interests also were demanding- its adaptation and ap plication. Other currents of industry were stagnant in the old streams of production and required a greater than man power to move them out of their stagnant condition and place them on a more prosperous stream of activity. Other men both pro fessional and mechanics were devoting their time and money to adapt this new power to their special work. Robert Fulton, an American and noted inventor was one among those giving their attention to the a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 February 1918

TWO BILLS. (Tospectfully inscribed to Billy Kaiser nnd Billy Sunday.) Of course you've heard about 'em too, So ill is will be no news to you. You've got t' give these Hills their dues, They sure monopolize the news. I cnn'l say much that ain't been said, Or argued, wrote about or read; Its in my mind, an awful load, IT I don't talk, I'm skeered I'll s'plode. You've got t' hand it to these Bills, They've got the 0. K. brand of wills, 'X courage, too, t' make a fight, They're due some credit, wrong or right. Now Kaiser Bill, without a doubt, lias got the lead on Saur-kraut, 'X beer, 'n cheese, 'n weinerwurst, Vcv things like these, jis count him furst, So Hill, says he: "There aint no doubt 1 need more room fer spreadin' out; While gittin's good I'll grab it all;" No three divisions to Bill's Gaul. "I'll hold the world 'n float no shares; 1 need the room t' sell my wares. Then in the Sun I'll have a spot; We'll rule this earth, jis me und Gott." A runny thing about these two, They cla...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 March 1918

J&uf#ch&^zeeA&( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general Information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grlenvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 VOTE AGAINST BRADFORD It may be true that, "while the lamp holds out to burn the vilest sinner may re turn," and if it is, perhaps James E. Brad ford, one of the nominees for mayor of Seattle, may have repented of his corpora tion advocacy and is now just as strong in his advocacy of the rights of the people as he was of the gree...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 March 1918

VOTE FOR OLE HANSON. At a call meeting of the King County Colored Republican Club the mayoralty candidacy of Ole Hanson was unanimously endorsed. The Club also went on record as appealing to the entire colored vote of the city to vo.te for Mr. Hanson next Tues day and all became he promised the mem bers of the election committee of the club, "If elected 1 solemnly promise that all < lasses of voters shall be given a square < eal. I will sec to it that the mem bers of the Civil Service Board live up to the law." The committee was convinced Ilia I the Colored voters and citizens of (lie city need expect no more nor no less than the white voters and citizens. Among those present and endorsing Mr. Hanson's candidacy were Andrew K. Black, presi dent of the club; Dr. D. T. Cardwell, secretary; Rev. W. 1). Carter, Dr. F. B. Cooper, Z. L. Woodson, B. F. Tutt, Mr. .lames. K. R. Chainey, Johnny Green, H. R. Cayton and others. The members of the club remember how badly colored folk have ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 March 1918

THEN WE CAN KNOW WHAT WE ARE DOING. AS IT IS, THE LABORER IS BEING FED FROM A SPOON, THE BOWL OF WHICH NO ONE CAN TELL FROM THE HANDLE!—Chicago Defender. BRILLIANT FINANCIAL SUCCESS No, dear reader, the First A. M. E. church of this city was neither full nor overflow ing:, yea, not only not that, but there were not to exceed fifty persons present last Tuesday evening at the meeting called by the Seattle branch of the National Associa tion for the Advancement of Colored People to raise funds to aid in the deefnse of the colored folks under arrest for the East St. Louis riots and for the maintainance of the families of the unfortunate soldiers of Ft. Sam Houston, but those present were there to show their sympathy and to back up their sympathies with the "almighty dol lar." In less than two minutes after the speaking program had ended and the chair man of the evening asked for a volunteer dollar contribution, hands went up and twenty-five dollars were in the collection basket. It is u...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 March 1918

then tlif longest continuous line of rail road in the world. \(» one can rcali/c the trials, the obsta ( lea jiikl tlie difficulties these early rail road builders had 1o meet, endure and overcome. The experience of the English in railroad building was not of much bene lit to railroad builders in this country. Railroad building here was then practically ;i new experience, nearly all were laid with heavy timbers, having a strip of hardwood si-antling fastened on the top and covered by ;i strop of iron for the rail. There were no facilities for the manu facture of heavy iron rails then, and for a long time afterwards in America. All such rails were imported from England. Roheri h. Stevens of Hoboken, New Jer sey, invented what is called the "T" rail in 1830, and it was the first laid on the Caniden and Araboy railroad, but was not manufactured in America for fifteen years later. The Montonr Mill at Danville, Penn sylvania, manufactured some of these rails in 1845, and from this time i...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 March 1918

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 "GEORGE MORRIS" IS DEAD Death after a lingering ilness, has claimed Judge George E. Morris and his remains were cremated yesterday in the presence of hundreds of friends and those of his rela tions as could be present. He had lived in and near Seattle for the past thirty years and had a wide circle of friends, admirers and acquaintances, th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 March 1918

was not of sufficient importance to attract his attention. No wonder Chairman Wilcox of the National Republican Committee was moved a short time ago to say: "This coun try never was so much in need of the Re publican party having charge of the govern ment as at present. However lamentable from the standpoint of the Entente Allies Russia is getting just what she richly deserves and the Central Powers can not grind it as a nation in too fine bits. The country is made up of dirty, double-crossing scoundrels, who merit every punishment that comes their way. Go to it, you Dutch devils, and hell to him who cries enough. An opportunity presenting itself for the Japanese government to grab much valuable Russian territory with Vladivostok as the commercial and seaport center ,she suddenly wakes up from the lethargy in which she fell immediately after grabbing much valu able German territory in China, and takes on active war operations. The Mikado moves when there is something in it for the M...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 March 1918

POLITICAL POT ME Seattle's mayoralty election is now his tory and some days ago Ole Hanson wired his friends: "I met the enemy and he is mine." In other words, Hanson defeated Bradford by nearly 5000, and the former is delighted while the latter is badly dis gruntled. The citizens of this city after its trouble with the United States government, resulting in the soldiers from Camp Lewis being barred from coming to the city on a visit, took it into their heads to clean up the city from stem to gudgen, and at the primaries they began the good work by eliminating Gill and at the general election they completed the job by eliminating Brad ford and Duncan. The American people are slow in getting aroused to the situation, but once done, they make a complete job of it. It's really amusing to hear Bradford amid his briny tears denounce the Star as a disreputable rag, in which Cayton's Weekly fully agrees, but for years the Star has been the political cesspool from which Jim Bradford has dai...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 March 1918

CALL ON THE PRESIDENT (Indianapolis Freeman) Recently President Wilson received a del egation of four members of the New York Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People by special appointment. The delegation placed before the president a petition signed by twelve thousand citizens of New York in which the president was asked to extend executive clemency to five Negro soldiers of the Twenty-fourth Infantry now under sentence of death by verdict of the court martial which tried the Houston riot cases, and requesting the president to cause to be laid before him a review of the cases of the forty-one soldiers of the same regiment who were sentenced to life imprisonment by the first court martial. The delegation consisted of -lames Weldon Johnson, Field Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Rev. George Prazier Miller, Rector of St. Augus tine's Church, Brooklyn, Rev. F. A. Cullen, president of the New York branch. Mr. J...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 March 1918

J&uflch&^Mejedzg PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice tv all men and for "all men up.' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub-' lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher CE EFHCNE: BEACON 1910 MOONEY AND THE NEGRO Mooney must not die, floats down from the White House, and the refrain is caught up by the great daily press of the coun try, as well as by the conservative citi zens, and, whether guilty or innocent, we, too, truly hope he will not die on the gal lows. Some one says, "The Mooney case is a titantic struggle be...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 March 1918

EDIIOHIAL PARAGRAPHS If Bob La Pollette does not pad the seat of liis trousers before going to Wisconsin he will be awfully pained when he sits down. Spring will soon come riding in on the wings of the morning, writes an enthusiast, ;<>\' \-. inter weather will come riding in the evening of the same day. Labor's share of the spoils of trade in dustry is all that the trust hogs are not able to take away in one load, and the mid dleman's share is in a hell of a fix. In leaving the office which he has so long dishonorably filled, if a hundredth part of the accusations laid at his door be true, Charles Hiram Gill leaves not a friend behind, nor does one await his return to private life to extend a welcome hand. As yon sow, so shall you reap. Religious creeds are slowly but surely Fading away before the flood of blood that is coming from the present world strug gle betwen men, and this blending of creeds seems hut in its inception. Within the next decade we would not be sur prised ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 March 1918

THE WAR Secretary of War, Newton D. Baker, was scheduled to speak for Fisk University at Philadelphia. He was unable to be pres ent but sent a letter which said: In our training camp at Dcs Moines, representative young colored men presented themselves for training. They devoted them selves with zeal to the task, and they are now imparting to the men under their charge the military lessons which they themselves learned, but more than this, they are teaching to their fellow-men the principle for w Thich America is in this war —those vital principles of democracy which are the foundation of the hopes of free people. Brig.-Gen. Blanding declares that the 370 th Infantry, formerly the Eighth Illi nois, "are as fine a set of soldiros as I ever hope to command. Their work along mil itary lines as well as their personal conduct has been beyond reproach. Forty-nine pri vates and non-commissioned officers have been given commissions. Forty one colored cadets from the Tenth Cavalry and Twenty-...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 March 1918

PERSONAL Miss Myrtle Shockley, one of the very blight students of the Franklin High School, is still seriously ill at the residence <>!' her parents, which is quarantined, thus preventing friends from calling to see her. Andrew R. Black is to join the imagi nary rotary club of Seattle among the col ored citizens. Mr. Black is one of the very prosperous attorneys of the North west who lias grown in His chosen pro fession steadily since the day he opened his law offices in the Pacific block, where lie still has offices. John and James Gayton, sons of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Gayton, gave an informal party last Saturday evening to which a number of their young friends were in vited. Dancing and other amusements were indulged in and light refreshments were served ere those present said good night. The evening was pleasantly spent by all present. Dr. L. D. Wishard, who was to have spoken to a mass meeting of colored people in this city last Friday evening, but changed hia plans in the in...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 March 1918

J@atfZcfi&4zee^{ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher ■TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 CHARITY BEGINS AT HOME "Who listens to L. D. Wishard, who is lecturing without cost or price, at least to his various congregations, tell of the hor rors of the present world war as perpe trated by the German, Anstro-Hungarian and Turkish soldiers upon helpless women and children, who happen to fall into their power, can but feel his ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 March 1918

ARE GETTING TOGETHER There seems to be a strong disposition for men and organizations to get together just now and quit splitting hairs over matters of minor importance. This is particularly noticeable among the pulpit and the press. The members of Protestant churches under different names who in the past have spent much of their energy denouncing each Others' creeds and denominations are now taking a common sense view of the relig ious situation and are more anxious to push the cause of Christ than the denomination, and flic different denominations in the same communities are uniting, each giving up its identity. Even Protestant and Catho lic organizations are showing more signs of fraternity than ever before, and if the same spirit of fraternity continues to grow and expand the world will soon be well on flic road to a great Christian Church and sectarianism will slink into oblivion. If Jleaven is the objective point of all denomi nations, why divide up on trivial matters? The pre...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 March 1918

amount of purchases they are making is so great that they can unite in the or ganization of a wholesale society and thus take the next step and cut out the profit of the wholesaler. And when still more societies have grown up and the member ship has become suflciently great, the wholesale society, instead of buying from the importer and manufacturer, imports and manufactures for itself. When this last step has been taken the economic prob lem is solved; the gamut is run; the revo lution is consummated. Securing commodities at the cost of pro duction is the least of the purposes of the Co-operative Movement. It aims at more important things. It takes advantage of the organization of people who have com mon needs, and introduces insurance against sickness, death, unemployment, ac cidents, and old age. It provides pensions for motherhood; makes loans to members; carries families on credit in the event of strikes and lockouts; provides housing, rec reations, clubhouses, medical and nurs...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 March 1918

"GRANNY GROSE" IS DEAD No more touching and pathetic funeral ceremonies have ever been held over the remains of a departed soul than those held over Mrs. Sarah Grose last Sunday after noon. She was about eighty-three years of age at the time of her death, which oc curred last Friday night, and a majority of the years of her life had been spent in Se attle, and she therefore was truly a pio neer. To pay their last respects to her memory white and black mingled together and judges, lawyers, doctors, and mer chants were present and looked long and sorrowfully on her remains. Mcs. Grose, Aunt Sarah, Granny Grose and Granny had been one and the same to not only all present, but to every one else she had been thrown in contact with since she came to Seattle—an administering an gel. She had fed the hungry, clothed the poor, cared for the sick and did not over look the down and outer—white, black, red, yellow, brown or any color, if in human garb, were one and alike to her. About the bier o...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 March 1918

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the •tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher IBIiEFEONE: BEACON 1910 EASTER OFFERING This Easter morning, the anniversary of the Ascension of Him, who died for the re demption of fallen man, our Father in Heav en, we pray for a re-baptism of the Holy Ghost; we pray for a redistribution of the love of Heaven among the peoples of this earth, that each and all of us may love our neighbors as ourselves, and that...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 March 1918

the kindred organizations for the protection oJ birds, beasts, fowls and tishi's, would show one-half as much interest in protecting inno cent colored men, women and children from wholesale butchery as they do the dumb brutes, then this burning at the stake of human beings because their skins are black would come to an abrupt end. In this we are reminded of a white woman in Seattle not long since who was almost in hysteria over the treatment the Armenian people were undergoing at the hands of the Turks, but when she was told of a like treatment the while folks of our own Sunny South were daily imposing on the colored citizens of thai section and organized labor all over this "land of the free and home of the brave," she hesitated for a moment and then replied, "1 never heard of it and it cannot be so, for I do not see it in the papers." If we are really and truly Christians we should first set our own house in order before try ing to set someone else's house in order. No, she has no...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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