ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: River Press, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,285 items from River Press, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
3,285 results
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

TE RIVE .. PRESS, HI Vol I, Fort Benton, Montana, Wednesday, February 9I 1881 N 16 WILLIAMS, WRIGHT & STEVENS, PUBLISHERS AND PROPREETORS. Terms...........................$5.00 per Year. RATES OF ADVERTISING: One Column, 1 year.............................$175 6 months ......................... " ...... 100 S 3 .months ... ........... 75 Half Column, 1 year .......................... 0 .. ...... . ............... 40 One-Third Column, 1 year............ ........80 , 6 months .................. 40 3 months .................. 30 Quarter Column, 1 year.... ... 75 . 6 months ... ....... .......... 40 3" months ................... 30 Three inches, 1 year ......... . 50 6months ..... ................ 3 . 3 months........................... 25 Professional Cards, 1 inch, 1 year................. 15 Rates for Transient Advertisements given at office. OFFICIAL DIRECTORY OF MONTANA DELEGATE IN CONGBESS. Hon. MARTIN MAGINNIS, Helena. Office. Name. Residence. Governor .......... BENJ. F. POTT...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

SKATING. Isn't it jolly ? Isn't it nice; This gliding, birdlike, o'er the ice ? I love to hear the ringing steel, When on the ice I stamp my heel. I love the keen, crisp air. I know It gives my cheeks a pretty glow, And makes my eyes shine as I gl:de Along, with Ha ry by my side. How well he skates! My hands he clasps. Perhaps a bit more firm he grasps Than need be. But I like the squeeze, And do not seem to mind it. He's Just splendid! Wonder if we'll glide Through life thus smoothly, side by side. It surely was a horrid trick In that small boy to put that stick Directly here in people's way. So Harry thinks. I heard him say He'll catch that boy and nearly kill Him for the prank. I hope he will! I'm sure poor Harry felt the fall, Although he says: "Not hurt at all!" We must have looked ridiculous. And everybody stared at us. A sight, no doubt, we did present, As backward on our heads we went. Well, there's some balm to heal my woes: I had on "just too lovely" hose. ]Ferocious Coura...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

THE BREAK-UP ON THE MIBSOURI. Scenes and Incidents at Benton-A Night of Watchfulness and Fear. [From the River Press Extra of the 4th.] Last night was a genuine sensation in Ben ton. Yesterday afternoon dispatches from Ft. Shaw and Rock creek indicated that all the tributaries of the Missouri were over their banks, and logs, ice and water was pour ing down, tearing out bridges, and overflow ing the adjacent lands. The great amount of snow which was known to have fallen all over Montana, and the continuance and exceptional warmth of the "chinook" wind, gave the "old timers" an intimation that we of Benton would soon get an accumulation of water, ice and .debris which might prove disastrous. And stories were told of former floods, and ice gorges that were likely to form. Only a few of the knowing ones kept awake, and the town went to sleep in blissful ignorance of danger. At half past seven the water began to rise, and at 9 there was a foot running on top of the ice. This did not incr...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

THE RIVER PRESS Wednesday, February 9, 1881. H. C. WILLIAMS, - - - - - - - EDITOR THE RECORD was deuteroscopied. Down 1 East they call it a "'scoop." THE Senate Finance Committee has re- I ported in favor of the long-time 3- per cent. t funding scheme. IN Connecticut the third crop of ice was c 11 inches thick, and from everywhere comes reports of storms and floods worse than our own. 1 CONKLING's man Friday, Platt, who will so ably represent his principal in the U. S. Sen ate, described as a man who can say less and t be longer in saying it than any man in Wash ington. He means a vote for Conkling, and a nothing more. THE coercion bill in the House of Com- 8 mons has united all the Irish parties against 1 it, and made them a unit upon others, upon which they could not previously agree. The t union among the Irish has apparently united all sections of the British in favor of the bill, and the fight thereon is apparently taking the phase of a final parliamentary conflict, a after whi...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

A STANGER IN THE LAND. t ije Experiences Cold Weather and Ex- s presses His Dissatisfaction. t I have been a stranger in the valley and t anxious to get acquainted with the people, I saddled my horse to go to the Crossing. It was one day last month, and not being ac customed to Montana winters I soon discov- t ered I was not wrapped sufficiently to stand such polar storms. Coming to a house where C lived a German family, and I asked if I r could borrow a scarf or something to wrap my ears. With the heart of a liberal soul the German man told me to come in, and he t handed me a shawl. t "Rather cold day," said I. "Fery cold; it is durty-dree pelow zero, and I have no beer to give a stranger; des am offul coontry," said he. I made a new start feeling very comfortable, and determined to sepak toevery one I would meet, and I did not expect to meet many but strangers, for Mr.H. and famly were the only i ones I knew in the neighborhood. As I was passing the next house, which is near the r...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

A LOVE SONG. O sad sweet eyes! 0 stars that light my soul ! O eyes that saturate with love my soul! That fill with pain and sympathy my soul! Ye hold me like a captive bound in chains. O sweet, fair face, sweetest when melancholy! Sweet lips that tremble with unuttered pains ! O soul of innocence, sublime and holy! Your sorrows pass, but still the trace remains. O helpless Love! that cannot help the one! O fruitless Love, that cannot bless the one, That cannot comfort or console the one, Who is tae idol of its adoration! Why should there be no healing in caresses? No power to comfort in my life's oblation, When one kind word from you my tired heart blesses, One look of love gives me such consolation ? PERSONAL AND IMPERSONAL. A poor family named Glen, in Philadelphia is said to have inherited $285,000 by the re cent death of the father of Mrs. Glen in Aus tralia. Cattle on the ranges in Wyoming are doing finely, the high winds having blown off near ly all the snow and they can now f...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

THE FLOOD IN THE TETON. Houses Surrounded by Water and Ice, and Families Driven to the Bluffs. [From the River Press Extra of the 5th.] Benton was hardly prepared this morning for another day of excitement, for the events of the previous day had left its people tired out, and not in a condition for, further de velopments from ice gorges and over-flowed rivers. But we were to have more, although not to actively participate in it. Early this morning was heard the dull roar of rushing waters and grinding ice, coming three miles and a half away from the Teton, and soon after came intelligence that the flood had covered the valley, and that altremendous ice gorge had formed for miles above the res idence of Mr. Stockings. Starting up rather late, we found, indeed, the water flowing over the valley, and indications that it had been at least ten feet higher about three hours before. Our first tangible intimation of disaster, was a couple of teams loaded with the families of Messrs. Neubert...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 9 February 1881

THE RIVER PRESS. Wednesday, February 9,1881. J. E. STEVENS, - - - - - - LOCAL EDITOR Ohoteau Lodge, No. 11, I. 0. 0. F. A regular meeting of the above Lodge will be held on Wednesday evening of each week, at their lodge Soom in this city. Sojourning brothers are cordially invited to attend. JNO. F. MURPHY, N. G. J. P. McCABE. Secretary. Benton Lodge, No, 25, A. F. & A. M. Regular Communications of the above named Lodge are held at 7 p. m. on the first and third Saturday of each month. Members of sister lodges and sojourn ing brethren are cordially invited to attend. RUFUS PAYNE, W. M. H. P. ROLFE, Secretary. IN TOWN AND OUT. ----- ----o Wood Is worth Twenty-five Dollars a cord, at Wholesale figures, and Will probably be retailed at The extremely cheap rate of a Dollar and fifty cents a stick, before Another week rolls into endless eternity. If you want a good square meal go to the Eataphone. Steps are being taken for the formation of a Press Association in Montana. Kleinschmidt ...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

Vol, I, Fort Benton, Montana, Wednesday, February 16, 1881. No1 17. WILLIAMS, WRIGHT & STEVENS, PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS. Terms,.........................$5.00 per Year. RATES OF ADVERTISING: One Column, 1 year ... ........................$175 6 months .......................... 100 " " ........................... . 75 Haif Column, 1 year............................ 100 6 months .......................... 75 3 " .................... . 40 One-Third Column, 1 year........................ 80 6 months .................... 40 3 months .................. 30 Quarter Column, 1 year ........................... 75 " 6 months ... .................. 40 4" 3 months .................... 30 Three inches, 1 year ............................ 50 6 months ......................... 35 3 months........................ 25 Professional Cards, 1 inch, 1 year ............... 15 Rates for Transient Advertisements given at office. OFFICIAL DIRETU'ORY OF MIONTANA DELEGATE IN CONGRESS. Hon. MARTIN MAGINNIS...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

FAREWELL. The boat went drifting, drifting, over the sleeping sea, And the man that I loved the dearest Fat in the boat with me. The shadow of ccming parting hung over the great gray swell, And the winds that swept across it sobbed on, fare well, farewell. The boat went drifting, drifting, in the lingering northern night, And the face that I loved the dearest paled with the paling light. We strove to join light laughter, we strove to wake a jest; But the voice that I loved the dearest rang sadly 'mid the rest. The boat went drifting, drifting, while the dull skies lowered down, And the "ragged rims of the thunder" gave the rocky head a crown. The boat went drifting, drifting, while to the darken ing sky. For the man that I loved the dearest the prayer rose silently. Oh, true, strong hand I touch no more; brave smile I may not see; Will the God who governs time and tide bring him back to my life and me ? PERSONAL AND IMPERSONAL, Turkish laws are good, but not well admin istered. Parn...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

THE SUICIDE. a , A shadowed form before the light, A gleaming face against the night, Clutched hands across a halo bright Of blowing hair,-her fixed sight Stares down where moving black, below, The river's deathly waves in murmurous silence flow. The moon falls fainting on the sky, The dark woods bow their heads in sorrow, The earth sends up a misty sigh: A soul defies the morrow ! QUIEN SABE. -The London Agricultural Gazette is con vinced that the coming sheep in England is the Hampshire. It says there is no race of sheep in the world that can vie with them in the production of large-sized lambs of from six to eight months old. -To make shoe-pegs enough for Ameri can use there are consumed annually 100,000 cords of timber and to make lucifer matches, 300,000 cubic feet of the best timber are re quired every year. Lasts and boot-trees take 500,000 cords of birch, beach, and maple, and the handles of tools 500,000 more. -The sea of Azoff has a new island, about one hundred feet in di...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

THE RIVER PRESS Wednesday, February 16, 1881. II. C. WILLIAMS, - - - - - - - EDITOR RTHE House Committee on War Claims de cided to report adversely upon Representative Hunton's bill, to provide for the settlement of the unpaid claims of those officers in the line of the revolutionary army who served to the close of the war for independence and were so returned on the books of the Treasu ry. The bill if adopted would have involved the payment of several millions of dollars. THE British seem to be meeting with more resistance than was anticipated from the Boers, who seem to be actively organizing on the best received European plan of warfare. They are also inviting the natives to rise, which, should they accomplish, will place a different aspect upon the whole war, and will render their conquest difficult, if not impos sible. THE Board of County Commissioners, at its last meeting, decided to begin the work of draining the town at once. They have acted wisely, for nothing was more need...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

MONTANA MITES. [Miner.] On the 100-foot level of the Alice mine, on Thursday night, an appalling accident hap pened to a man named Rickard, resulting in his death at 11 o'clock that night. From what can be ascertained relative to the dis tressing affair, it appears that the unfortunate man was working on some staging elevated about ten feet from the floor, and that he either lost his balance and fell, or the support gave way precipitating him to the floor. Di rectly under the scaffold was a striking ham. mer, the handle extending upward. This penetrated his abdomen for a distance of twelve or fourteen inches. The agony in flicted was almost beyond human endurance, and it became at once apparent that the suf ferer could not survive. He was removed from the mine and brought to the hospital, where he received the tenderest of care until 11 o'clock, when death came to his relief. [Husbandman.] If the season opens early there will be double the amount of land sown on this val ley this ye...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

THE YEAR ABROAD. Leading and Signifloant Events Transpir ing in 1880,. Nothing in the history of foreign lands during the past year has been so worthy of attention, or so fortunate for the world, as the shift of power in England from Disraeli and the Tories to Gladstone and the Liberals. England, of all the European powers, is the one to which the world looks for a policy friendly to liberty and governed by reason. But under the guidance of Iord Beaconsfield the opening year found her engaged in a series of selfish intrigues and more selfish wars of aggression, which were called a vig orous foreign policy. Its close finds her in the old place of honor, as a nation which in the main aims at doing righteousness, and honestly in love with fair play, though not always able to see what is fair play. Her policy towards Japan, China and the Trans Republic still stains her escutcheon, and the delay in her evacuationaof Afghanistan, as well as her decision to profit by the aggres sions of th...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

- . -- i n ,-,, - . - THE ENGLISH PARLIAMENT. Growth of the British House of Commons from Edward I. to the Present Time. 'While it would be an easy task, were we in a critical mood, to find many and grave faults in Mr. George H. Jenning's "Anecdotal His tory of the English Parliament," (D. Apple ton & Co.,) yet its many excellencies far out weigh the defects. There are two drawbacks to the success of such a book as that now be fore us-its arrangement should be tropical, instead of having the anecdotes grouped un der the.names of the persons of whom they are told; its compiler should quit the beaten paths so familiar to readers of intelligence, and introduce us to tales and traits less sadly trite. It is a pity, too, that Mr. Jennings could not have waited a few weeks and so have taken advantage of new Blue Book, showing the names of all members of Par liament returned since 1696, and of such members returned to the House before that date, as can be traced. We shall take the libe...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 16 February 1881

THE RIVER PRESS. Wednesday, February 16, 1881. J. E. TVENS,. - - - - - - -- LOCAL EDITOR Ohoteau Lodge, No. 11, I, . ,0. F. A'regular meeting of the above Lodge will be held on Wednesday evening of each week, at their lodge oomin this city. Sojourning brothers are cordially invited to attend. JNO. F. MURPHY, N. G. J. P. McCABE, Secretary. Benton Lodge, No. 25, A. F. & A. M. 'Regular Communications of the above named Lodge are held at 7 p. m. on the first and ,third Saturday of each month. Members of sister lodges and sojourn ing brethren are cordially invited to attend. EUFUS PAYNE, W. M. IH. P. ROLFE, Secretary. THE CHURCHES. EPISCOPAL. 'Episcopal Church services are held every Sunday at the Court House, at 11 a. m. and 7 p. m. Sunday School at 2:30 p. m. Rev. S. C. Blackiston, Pastor. CATHOLIC. Catholic Church services will be held at the several churches as follows: Fort Benton-First and last Sundays of each month. Sun River-Second Sunday of each month. Fort Assinaboin and Fo...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 23 February 1881

THE R IVER P ESS. oFr ennaa Wdea, Fbur.,18 Vol. I. Fort Benton, Montana, Wed esday, February £8, lS8l. No. 18. • a ' i - iialiil ng i all m m l R i I I Il_ in n~i a a• •In li i nilnllm •a a alml alu el •- - • ai-~ pi .. ea Inn - ian WILLIAMS, WRIGHT & STEVENS, PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS. Terms, ..........................$5.00 per Year. RATES OF ADVERTISING: One Column, 1 year ...............................175 " 6 months............................ 100 " 3 " ............................ 75 Ialf Column, 1 year.............................. 100 6 months ........................ 75 3 " ............... .... .... 40 One-Third Column, 1 year.................... 80 6 months ............... 40 `" 3 months ................... 30 Quarter Column, 1 year........................... 75 6 months ................... 40 " 3 months ........ ........... 30 Three inches, 1 year ............................ 50 6 months ......................... 35 "" 3 months ..... .................... 25 Profession...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 23 February 1881

THE DECLARATION. What makes my heart so wildly throb ? I'm glad, not sorry-yet I sob. What ails me, th st I cannot rest ? He told me what I partly.gueseed. Why will th. tears o'.rflow my eyes ? It must have been the glad surprise: Surprise to find I rightly guessed; Delight to hear he loved me best. A sudden joy affects like grief, But with joy's tumult comes relief To feel all fears are set at rest, As when he drew me to his breast. QUIEN BABE, -An easy method for showing whethe; butter is adulterated with beef-fat has beer submitted by Hagar. He saturates a cottoe wick with a suspected sample, which is firs& melted. He then lights the wick, and per. mits it to burn for about two minutes. Al the end of that time, when the wick is ex. tinguished, an odor like that given off by a tallow candle, when its flame is blown out, is readily perceived, if the butter is artificial. -The Plotographic News describes a de tective camera, the invention of Mr. Bolas, It is like a shoeblack's b...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 23 February 1881

PERSONAL AND IhMPERONAL, The Merve chiefs have resolved to resist the Russians to the last. The elders have gone to Candahar to seek aid. Invitations bearing French and American signatures have been issued for a monetary conference to begin on the 19th of April. King John, of Abyssinia has decided to send an important mission to Egypt to return thanks for the favorable reception of his en voys by the Khedive. It is a fact worthy of note that most great i composers have been childless. Handel, Hadyn, Beethoven, Corelli, Pergolessi, Ros sini, Spontini, Auber, and Schumann are in stances. The marquis of Hartington, secretary for I India, says the government's decision in re- I gard to Candahar was taken with full know- 1 ledge of the probable success of the Russians E at Geok-Teppe. t The emperor of Japan has broken through traditional etiquette ito such a degree as greatly to astonish his people. He has actu ally dined on board a vessel commanded by 6 the duke of Genoa. It is rumored ...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The River press. — 23 February 1881

THE RIVER PRESS. Wednesday, February 23, 1881. Hi. C. WILLIAMS, - ..- - - -.. EDITOR WE will soon begin the publication, in this paper, of a series of papers on "The Troglo cites of Ft. Benton and the North." WE have before mentioned the necessity of a mail service to the Barker district, and hope that another effort will be made by our citizens to place this matter before our dele gate and the department. It is assuming such importance that some action should be taken. THERE was a terrible disaster in a theatre at Munich, Germany, on the 18th, which was caused by one of the artists dressed in the costume of an Esquimaux, setting fire to his dress in lighting a cigar, and then rushing in terror among others similarly attired. Four Germans were burned to death and four fa tally and several slightly burned. THERE is one thing rendered certain in the present Irish revolution, and that is that in Parnell they have a leader who combines great executive power, and a cool head with a deep ...

Publication Title: River Press, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Montana, United States
x
Loading...
x
x