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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

which we call "the education," is only a fraction of it, and we are far astray when we are not con scious of the other elements and take no part in the educational processes. Learning to recognize printed words and to spell, getting the multiplica tion table and doing fractions and the square root are all very well and very necessary and as a mat ter of course. These text books are excellent teachers. Rules and definitions and exercises have their proper place, and schoolmasters must look well to thoroughness of drill in these things. But they are not all. Much of soul-development—and that is what education is—comes otherwise. Much of it cannot be set down in the book, nor used as a means of class drill. The avenues to the soul are not all through lan guage. Harsh sounds affect the conscious human being more than harsh words, gentle sounds than gentle words. The atmosphere of vice is worse man the witnessing of a crime. Moral precepts fall upon listless ears while a righteous life a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

10 DAIRY AND CREAMERY There's a good lot of dairy cows be ing offered in the advertisement of Lowman & Pelly, page 16 of this issue. Mr. Polly informs us that this herd is being sold off, because the land, being close to Seattle, is to bo platted into suburban lots. Therefore parties want ing cows can do well calling or writing at once to the address given. THE DAIRY SCHOOL. Pullman, Wash.. Dec. 3, 1902. The Ranch: I am sure that the farmers and ranchers of Washington who are interested in the extension of the dairy interests of the state will be glad to know that the college is ma king preparation to hold its annual dairy school again this year. Owing to the burning of the old creamery plant in the summer oi 1901, we have been very much handicapped in our creamery and dairy work, and are forced to occupy very incommodious quarters for this purpose. However, arrangements are being made to carry out the school as usual, and our plans are so nearly perfected that we think that we ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

S^l THE POULTRY YARD < Warmth and Laying. Every farmer and poultryman knows that when there are several days of very cold weather the hens stop lay ing, while during the warm weather they all seem to begin laying at once. The fact is one which is a problem to some, as it is not always due to the kind of food or the quantity that the eggs are reduced in number or in creased. When the quarters are warm in the winter and the fowls are as com fortable as they are in summer, the hens will not be so quickly affected by the changes in the weather, but there is no flock, no matter how well man aged, that does not fall off in eggs to a certain extent when the weather is severely cold. This is probably the in stinct of the wild hen, though only par tially so, which prompts her to bring forth her young only under extremely favorable conditions, but it is safe to claim that as the hen will work under summer conditions the best mode of securing eggs is to have summer con ditions in the poultr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

12 > LIVESTOCK INTERESTS < THE BREEDER'S COW VS. THE FARMER'S COW. The solo object in breeding cattle or live stock of any kind is to produce an animal of superior usefulness for the common farmers of the country: a cow, for instance, whose calf will pro duce a superior quality of meat in greater abundance at the same or low er cost. The chief end of the beef cow is to produce a calf that will furnish beef at the greatest profit. The chief end of the dairy cow is to produce milk which will furnish butter and choose at the lowest cost. Whenever the breeders forget that the farmer is the man for whom they must ultimately breed, they lay the foundation for future trouble. When ever they get out of hearing of up-to date, improved farming, they are apt to go astray. We sometimes fear when we visit state fairs and stock shows that the breeder is getting not only out of hearing of the ordinary farm or, but is in danger also of getting out of his sight. If the breeder is to pro duce a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

DAIRYING AT YAKIMA. There is money in the dairy business in the Yakima valley and the farmer owning a good dairy is sure of a good income each month in the year. At present there are 3,000 head of good dairy stock distributed among the farm ers in the various districts and the amount of money paid out to the own ers at the present price of butter amounts to $1,250 a day, or $456,250 in a year. These figures represent the winter business alone. During the summer months the production is about 7,500 pounds per day, thus ma terially increasing the yearly value. There are five creameries located in the valley, to-wit: Rockwood and Meadow Brook, of North Yakima; Mil ler Bros., of the Upper Naches; Moun tain View, at Sunnyside, and one onwed by Mrs. Carmichael at Yakima City, besides two skimming stations that ship cream to the Sound cities. The product of these creameries is 3,500 pounds of butter a day. The ranchers make an average of 1,500 pounds of butter a day, giving a total at the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

14 ANNUAL REPORT OF SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. (Continued from Page 2.) an importation of select breeding queens from Italy and smaller impor tations from Austria and Cypress. Very favorable reports of these queens have been received. Two additional ield agents have been appointed in the Division of Sta tistics with a view to further improv ing its crop-reporting service, and the statistical expert, who for some years had charge of the crop statistics of foreign countries competing with the United States, has now been stationed in London, England, so as to be in close touch with the statistical officers of European governments, whose re ports, together with authoritative com mercial intelligence of interest to American farmers, he transmits to Washington by mail or cable. The Secretary announces that the work of this division will shortly form the subject of a special report to Congress. Progress in Experiments and Educa tion. The Secretary urges that the num ber of workers in the st...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

TILE FOR UNDERDRAINAGE. There is no need of caution con cerning the use of soft tile for under drainage. I grant that it is a matter of opinion only, but it is probable that many underdrains will be short lived because the material used was too soft. It is a short-sighted policy on the part of tile burners to dispose of any tile that has not been burned hard enough to make it absolutely safe. There is less loss in a soft burned kiln, because the warping and cracking is less, and burners do not burn hard un less there is an absolute demand on the part of purchasers, but it is reas onable to believe that the hard-burned will outlast the soft-burned. I know that this is true of mains that cannot be put below the frost line for any rea son, as is shown by the crumbling of very soft tile during a winter above ground. But no matter how great the depth, the presence of air and water will finally cause the tile to give way. It is too porous. The claim was made formerly that tile should be p...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

16 BETTER TALK TO US when you are ready to ship your cream. We have a proposition that will be of advantage to every dairyman within two hundred and fifty miles of Seattle. Ours is the ideal system, with modern, up-to-date cream-gathering and butter making equipment. We have the best butter market in the West. We guarantee to get you more for your butter than you will be paid for it at home. No pan-skimming. No churn ing. No drudgery for the women folks. You keep the skim-milk. We pay spot cash twice a month. H. I. Weinstein & Co., Seattle Successors to the Meadowbrook Co. CLOSING - OUT d SALE! m A Choice Lot o H DAIRY COWS HOLSTEINS, JERSEYS AND SHORTHORNS. Also Farm Imple ments and 9O tons hay in barn Lowman & Pelly Sll Pioneer Bldg., Seattle THE RANCH. CREAMERY SUPPLIES We have everything for the creamery and dairy. We have the most com plete stock on the Coast North of San Francisco. Then you know we have been doing business a long while now and you can feel pretty sure ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

1 I . . I I =IBB1BWSBB^ _i_^___e^s_BB_B^Be_I^^B^^__§ • ____■ 'Jama bbbMH&bbMbI bbbbbbsb I_B__^b_ bbbb— 1—KH Nineteenth Year SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, JAN. I, 1903. JAMES A. MOORE Regarding whom we have some thing to say on page"4. '>''* Subscription $1 Per Year Worth Two Gold Dollars

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

3 PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS FOR FRUIT GROWERS. Fruit Growing. Fruit growing as a commercial in dustry is becoming more and more a specialized business and one that re quires peculiar adaptations on the part of those who would follow it success fully. The man himself is one of the most important factors in the busi ness; it is not every one who can make a success of fruit growing. This fact finds abundant demonstration. It is a frequent observation that of two men living side by side with equal ad \antages for growing fruit, one has abundant crops and has become pros perous and independent therefrom: the other finds his fruit plantations a burden. He is not by nature adapted to the business. But perhaps the lat ter may make a great success of stock raising, while the former is as great a failure at this as the latter is at growing fruit. Fruit growing should be considered from two points of view—that of the small plantaiton intended to supply fruit for home use only, and that of more pre...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

T He ranch AJmnu ftr-TfilAApMrnt/kifinrtnit fit* Wot-. With which is consolidated I he Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associ ation. Mli.l-KK KUKKMAX, - Editor and Manager. Editorial Offices: - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle Metropolitan Bldg., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye Subscription (In advance) 91.00 per year. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscrip tions. (Jeni«i commission and salaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We mirnt be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot ti ul It on our list from the name alone on the pa per....

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

4 JAMES A. MOORE. Them arc some really remarkable men in Seattle, who are devoting all their energies to the up-building of the metropolis. One of these men, with whom we wish our readers to be better acquainted, is James A. Moore, Whose photograph we are able to re produce on our first page. To no one other individual can as much credit be given lor the growt the city is making. A big man —big in body, big in every way. broad-minded, with a scope of vision tar beyond that of the average individual. He plans on a large scale, and executes admirably. To him city-building is an art. In his way he has much of the quality that makes J. Pierpont Morgan such a force. His office reminds one of noth ing so much as the headquarters of the commander of an army. Dozens of people flock in to see him constant ly, contractors, builders, architects, real estate men, prospective purchas ers, tenant, laborers, etc. He handles a volume of business that would stag ger an ordinary man, and all the time...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

7MOTES AND QUERIES WHAT VARIETIES TO PLANT? This is the all-important question that presents itself to every man who is planning to plant an orchard. Mr. F. W. Nessly, whose letter we print be low asks our horticultural editor to name the varieties that he knows by experience to be the most desirable to plant. Mr. Walden will answer this correspondent in a special article in our issue of Jan. 15. We suggest to all our readers who are interested in the subject to carefully watch for and pre serve this article, as it will be an espe cially valuable one. Tell your friends, too, in order that they may send in their subscriptions in time to get this number. Prosser, Wash., Dec. 27, 1902. Mr. F. Walden, Zillah, Wash.: Dear Sir—Will you kindly let me know what varieties of apple you con sider best adapted to Yakima county, especially for commercial orchards. I am interested in the fruit business, and no doubt your wide experience in this line will be of great benefit to me. If you will sen...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

6 THE WICKED OLEO MEN. There are indications that the big oleo manufacturer! are about to aband on oleo and go into butter manufaet are on a largo scale with the purpose of controlling the whole butter manu facture. In other words, they want to make a big butter combine and get the entire dairy interest under their thumbs. The idea seems to be for the packers to go into the market and bid up butter prices so high as to popular ize the oleo in its uneolored condition. and dairymen are warned against play ing into their hands by accepting small advances on what the creameries are paying, since the effort will be to freeze out the creameries and then have the dairymen where they will be helpless to oppose the packers. Dairy men should keep their eyes on this scheme and not allow themselves to be deceived by temporary advances in price. With the creameries killed off they will be in the hands of the oleo men. THE ART OF TESTING. Editor Ranch —"Testing is a very simple thing." This is an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

may recover from tuberculosis. One animal reacted in December, 1898. She was lulled sixteen months afterwards and there was found but one calcare ous nodule. Another reacted at the «ame time and when slaughtered also at the same time was shown to be very slightly affected; on the other hand 3 others were tested, in each case at the same time, with the same result, and their post mortem exam ination showed extensive tuberculous matter. There is no evidence of en tire recovery, but the evidence seems to show that recovery is possible; or, perhaps to put it more correctly, in some cases the disease makes little or no progress, the tuberculous mat ter becomes encysted, while in others the disease advances very rapidly. As a whole the bulletin gives strong testimony as to the value of the Bang method; that is, testing the animals, separating them into two herds, keep ing the herds entirely separate, and testing the healthy herd some six months afterwards lest there might be some cases de...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

8 Horticultural Notes By F. W»lden Did you road that excellent paper by Pres ident Bryan in the last issue of The Ranch ? Tf not. then hunt it up and read it. or you will miss something good. Such views of rural life will do much good. Many young people see nothing on the farm but hard work a-nd disagreeable surroundings. Make home beautiful and the surroundings pleas ant and not so many of our sons and daugh ters will drift to the cities. Tf more of our leading educators would do what the presi dent of Washington Agricultural College is doing there would be an awakening to the charming side of farm life and vastly more of our young people would return to the country at the end of their school days, in stead of drifting into the congested cities. Give us some more along that line. "Bro. Bryan. * * * Tt has been hoped that by means of gov ernment aid a high-line ditch would be con structed in Yakima county, and in this way a large amount of the best fruit land in the state would be b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

Tenth Annual Meeting of the Washington State Dairymen's Association, to be held at Kent, Wash., January 14-15 --16, 1902. H. L. Blanchard, Hadlock, Wash., Pres. G. M. Brown, Spokane, Wash., Vice Pres. D. S. Troy, Chimacum, Wash., Sec.-Treas. FIRST DAY. Wednesday, January 14, 1902. 10:30 a. m.: Meeting- called to order by the president. Reading of the minutes of the last meeting and report of the secretary and treasurer. Dairying in Washington,—Past, Present and Future," by James Hart. Wednesday, 1130 p. m. Address, by Prof. T. L. Ha-ecker, professor of dairy husbandry, University of Minne sota. Hog Raising, D. Mclnnis, Dungeness, Wash. The Silo. W. J. Langdon. Wednesday, 7:3 c* p. m. The Outlook for Dairying in Washington, Prof. E. E. Elliott. The Sire, Daniel F. Boissevain. SECOND DAY. Thursday, January 15, 1902, 9:30 a. m. Appointment of committees by the Presi dent. Annual address, the President, Hon. H. L. Bla-nchard. The Angora Goat Industry and Its Rela tion to Dairying: in We...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

10 THE FARM SEPARATOR SYSTEM. The hand separator system is prac tically new, and whether it will be suc cessful depends upon just two people —the one who owns and operates the machine and the one who buys and manufacture! his cream into butter. Some people argue that the suppliers should be better able to take care of the cream from a hand separator than the whole of the milk from which this cream is taken. This possibly may be correct in theory, but practice does not prove it. The same attention given to the cream from a hand ma chine will not keep it in as good con dition as the same attention given to the whole milk. The cream needs as good or better care than does the milk. It needs to be churned just as quick as it is drawn from the cow, af cream separated at the factory. Or as we find with the whole milk sys tem, the shortest time it is left in the hands of the suppliers the better it will be for the grade of butter. It today I wish to start out to in assured by the 500 suppli...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

THE POULTRY YARD Ventilation and Draughts. Good ventilation at all times, by day and night, is highly essential to the health of poultry stock. Much of the disease to which birds are subject may be traced for its origin to a neglect in ventilating the poultry house. No man should expect to profit by raising fine stock of any kind unless he gives it his personal supervision, and when the care of the fowls is entrusted to an un interested person, there are usually great losses, and the owner comes to the conclusion that poultry does not pay. Ventilation does not mean cold draughts over the fowls, but a change of foul air by keeping the windows and doors open during the day. Lamine, Mo. Economy in Feeding. There are a good many ways of feeding poultry and not getting any thing from your food, and that is by wasting and overfeeding the fowls, when the hens will not lay. One must feed different kinds of food and change every day or two, and if you want eggs you must feed food that will p...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

II LIVESTOCK INTERESTS < THE ART OF FEEDING. Editor Ranch—The recent interest in livestock tanning in Eastern Washing ton has be«ll very gratifying, and it is to be hoped will have an important influence on the future prosperity of that section. I wish to call the atten tion Of farmers who have recently en gaged in beef production to a point which is sometimes overlooked. Ordi narily it costs from five to eight cents a pound to fatten a steer, and when the fat steer is worth only four or five cents a pound, the question naturally arises, where the profit comes. The answer to this is that when it costs as much or more to put on flesh than the flesh is worth, the profit, if there is to be any, must come in the in creased price per pound on the orig inal weight of the steer. I have re cently been doing a little figuring on this subject, and some of the results are interesting. For instance, sup pose that an 800-pound steer in thin condition is worth four cents a pound, and that by t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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