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Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,974 items from Little Falls Weekly Transcript, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

S dv Sftl' •. lsrs VOL. 19. A «lj. V,'^-r?- CALM AFTER THE STORM. Comparative Quiet In Chicago After Saturday's Struggle. SEVERAL SMALL MOBS FOBMi.f But No 'Concerted Effort Made Either Incendiarism or Violence. SATURDAY'S FIGHT DISCUSS Officials of tthe I Killed. Opinion That Least a Dozen Were CHICAGO, July 9. Comparative quiet prevailed during the day, though there were, as might have been ex­ pected, a number of sparodic instances where little knots of malcontents gath­ ered, became boisterous and were finally scattered by a charge from the police. A number of small mobs formed, went rioting, firing and over­ turning cars heads were cracked, and email fry brawls, mostly the result of too much bad whisky, were 'frequently reported at police headquarters. There was, however, no concerted effort at Incendiarism or Viuloncf, although at a number of places in­ dividual cars were fired, several of Which were destroyed. A coal train on the Eastern Illinois was ditched by a switch being...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

., u, ,im m?* 1were •-?v :w.! 'v-'i mm mmmrnm 3 gg* Sf* & BUCHANAN HAS TURN AT While some are yet so much in the Jdark as to believe the strikes are the iwhole of the wrong, those who think know that strikes aro the effects and not the causes, and those who do think, to that extent at least, are becoming very numerous. When that truth once gets into a man's brain, it stays there. iSo you can see that strikes serve a grand (purpose which is not generally placed ito their credit. They make the people jthink. I want to say right here that some of the preachers who have been lately talking about strikes didn't think long enough before expressing them­ selves. If it wasn't a painful sight to see such bunglers occupying exalted jplaces, one could laugh at some of the idiotic breaks made by gentlemen who write D. D. after their names. I have jread a score or so of this class recently, but will call attention to one as a fair sample. Rev. Frank M. Bristol of a Chicago Methodist church p...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

r4 miuV,' ji" •:k jjfco help f^ffcfiiH.rr?/'V'w,-'»C:¥jt'.--" 4«|^~T S AT CHICAGO. The Day Passes Without a Con­ flict Between. Rioters and Armed Forces. DISTINCT SIGKS OF 1MPE0VEMENT. Many Roads in Various Localities Return to Their Normal Conditions. CHICAGO, July 10.—-The wheels of commerce still the A. R. U. Nevertheless the war cloud which has overhung, this city and this land for the past 10 days shows distinct signs of lifting. Instead of stories of additional railroads tied up at various points throughout the country the day's dispatches, almost without exception, bring advices of strikers returning to work and an in­ creased resumption of traffic, amount­ ing in some places to a return to nor­ mal conditions. The day in Chicago has passed with­ out a serious conflict between the riot­ ers and the armed forces now on duty here. The feature of the day has been the action, after an all night session, of the federated trades unions of Chicago in deciding to Call Oat All Classes...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

•It: w* ..•&* hw-v 1 A!?' »:,t" 1"^?' 9 *y W\ w$$. E:vv gte-A«£ "P^£. 13-i JS, Knights of Xiabor-of theOountry Called Out by Master Work­ man Sovereign. A MILLION MEN ARE AFFECTED. Members of the Order to Cease Work Until Pullman Troubles Are Settled. IT'S A FIGHT FOR A PRINCIPLE. Labor, He Says, Insists on the Right to Present Grievances to Capital. CHICAGO, July 11.—Knights of Labor throughout the entire country, number­ ing nearly 1,000,000 men, have been called upon to strike for the cause of organized labor. General Master Workman Sovereign issued an order late in the evening to all members of the organization to cease work until the conflict originating in the strike of the Pullman employes shall have been settled. Following is the text of the order: To the Knights of Labor of America —A crisis has been reached in the af­ fairs of this nation that endangers the peace of the republic. Every fiber in our civil structure is strained to the breaking point. The shadows of fac­ ...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

•'•'IIP mlar wc,. :,* 1 f/-, I:^ 1 idi1 '3$ W-' 4* 'r 0::,fl FR-" MORTGAGE F«)RE6L0SURE SALE *3^ Default having been made In the payment of the sum of nine aud fifty-two one 'tundredths dollars, Interest, which la claimed to be doe and is due at the date of this notice, upon a mort ga*e duly executed by "Edwin Patch and wife, Viola A. Patch, as mortgagors, to George W. Thayer, mortgagee, dated the 18th day of April, 3892, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds la the county of Morrison and state of Minnesota on the 18th day of April, 1891'. at 5-30 •o'clock, p. m, in book "T" of mortgages, On |age no action or proceeding- having acfcioi at law een Instituted at laftr or otherwise to recover the debt, secured by said mortgage or any part thereof, notice is hereby given, that by virtue of th« power of sale contained in said mortgage the mortgage will be foreclosed by a sale of the premises described in and conveyed by said mortgage, to-wit: Lots one and two in «eetion thi...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

*_*.'.• :4 virr.Tf1 t* V- it- 11 i?ps --. '&• & Beltrami. Crow Wing $• |||j| !TTIE FALLS TRANSCRIPT BY THE TRANSCRIPT PUB. (.JO. PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. SUBSCRIPTION: yttur. %•••••»••••.#••«•••••••••••••••••••*'' ^)X DkwQtilri******••••••** •.»•#«••••••§••••••••••••••#•##•••• 76 .) Tldtf tiiOQthSxa•*••••••, ^MM*. ADVERTISING RATES LOW. LITTLE FALLS, IC ADVERTISING RATES.„ DAILY TRANSCRIPT. Piofessional Caids, 1 month .$1.00 1 inch, one month 1.50 2 inches, one month, 2.75 3 inches, one month, 3.50 4 inches, one month, 4.25 5 inches, one month, 5.00 10 inches, one month, 8.50 20 inches, one month, 15.00 40 inches, one month, 25.00 Reading notices 5 cents per line sin­ gle insertion, or 20 cents per week. WEEKLY TRANSCRIPT. Professional Cards, per y'r $5.00 inch, one year... 6.00 2 inches, one year 10.50 3 inches, one year 15.00 4 inches, one year 1^.00 5 inches, one year .21.00 10 inches, one year.* 36.00 5K) inches, one year 60,00 40 inches, jne year 100.00 Reading Notices, ...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

r» 1 ¥m Pfv, V,',V.^v fjt"* ,£ §y & 1 I Ml •&? lif,, flS £$*" fe? V-\ vAVa"' -V. A 4fi- JOB PWlllfINC TIE TMJMM JOB OITlCl S NOW SUPPLIED WITH NEW MATERIAL, TROUGHOUT. NEAT, CHEAP ANI KAPI1X Mrs. F. A. Fowler, who has had a severe attack of rheumatism this week, is improving. Mr. and Mrs. Warren Hastej*. of St. Cloud, are the guests of their daughter, Mrs. J. E. Hayden. "A. Tanner has had four new awn­ ings put up in front of his store to take the place of the old ones. L. Cooley drove down from Brain erd Thursday evening, bringing his daughter, Mrs. Dr. Roberts, with him. A number of young folks will go into camp at Fish lake, Green Prai­ rie, Saturday and remain there sev­ eral weeks. Messrs. Carlson and Oleson have opened up a saloon on the West side In the building formerly occupied by L*irs Hanson. Barney Burton is having a large sign built on top of the Rhodes block. It is 25x25x15, and wilt have his name on it in large letters. John McCauley expects to engage in the r...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

*V it *awr :o\T Mil lit) GOVERNOR HO the k-M is & PR HIXTH PA'jE.] NELSON'S Present and Future Governor Talks to the We have been struggling for more than a year, and are still deep in the midst of a great industrial depression, permeating to a greater or less degree all classes, »all in­ terests and employments. The purse strings of capital, through want of confi­ dence, or through a spirit of fear or timid­ ity, have tightened or have become entirely congested. In consequence of this fact, to a very large extent, the field of labor has been greatly reduced and narrowed. This in its turn has largely increased the *rmy of the unemployed, and in many cases re­ duced the scale of wages of those who who still have something to do. With capital in hiding and labor famishing for something to do, economy and want have brought about a reduced state of consump­ tion and an enlarged state of over produc­ tion and over supply. The whole situa­ tion has baen further intensified by pro­ lon...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

•••k.sfi W MI I#'1H-.1 MM •?&*>, ^si? 't '1 Special to the Daily .Transcript. W*S 4 f\ X.»* P? ,'j'i The Government at Wash­ ington Still Lives and Will Quell Riots. U. S. Mail Trains Will Be Started Under Protec­ tion of Troops* Quieter at Chicago, and No New Developments in Strike Difficulty. Army Protection. W ASHINGTON,July7.—Gen.Seofield, commanding the armj has sent or­ ders to Gen. Merrit, at Ft. Snelling, and Gen. Otis, Vancouver Barracks, directing them to use tlieii* forces to open communication throughout the entire length of the Northern Pacific, railroad. The position of the authorities is that this road is a military and mail line, and the in­ terests of the government demand its operation be allowed. Similar orders will shortly be issued cover­ ing the Union Pacific lines. Mobs Still Wild. Special to Transcript.. CHICAGO, July 7.—Rioting continues today in the railroad yards of Chica­ go, but not so bad as last night. Several (ires were started today, but the d...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

'f-^{ 8 H- fc« .and iU Remarks by Some of tlie Citizens on the Strike. I Spme Want Peace "WMle Others Would Fight It Out. A mass meeting of the American Railway Union and citizens was held at the opora house Tuesday evening and addresses were made by local speakers. It was the intention to have a speaker from Minneapolis, but the train was several hours late so the audience had dispersed when he arrived. Rev. George R. Geer, of the M. E. church, addressed the meeting at some length. His theory of the settlement of matters of this kind between the employer and Jtlie em­ ploye was arbitration. He thought the strikers should bide their time, and by the ballot elect men who would enact laws compelling men to submit matters of this kind to ar­ bitration. Mayor Staples was then called on, and his idea seemed to be arbitration and the government control of rail­ roads. The objection was then made that it would then be a great political machine, operated by the party then in power. This obj...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

tskVw, w& #V r, ''TlK- uSAvi^» SS' *f V: :4 't~ v.n %-o 0V miv\ tVw v.- -i*£r ISo Change in the Strike Situation at {kittle Falls." Passenger Trains are. Run With "Scab" men. Freighting by Team Be­ tween St. Cloud and Little Falls. The strike situation at Little Falls remains unchanged and everything is quiet and orderly. No. 7 came in Thursday evening about two hours behind time with Conductor Rea in charge and "Scab". Martin, "the oldest scab on the line." on the en­ gine. There were a number of mar­ shals on board, but only twoshowed themselves. The usual crowd was at the depot to see the train pull in and size up the crew. No. 8failed to put in an appearance Friday''^aornimr, but came in as part of No. (i, in charge of Conductor Kirkpatrick with Groad, "scab," on the engine. No. 6 is the longest train pulled in since the strike began, hav­ ing nine cars. No. 5, with Conduc­ tor Smith in charge and a. "scab" named Mauser on the engine, met No. 6 here. Each train had a num­ be...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 13 July 1894

h* if &T '5 '5 1ft S w*. & •sv/ f: HEEE'S A CHRISTIAN. ANOTHER "CLERGYMAN TELLS UNVARNISHED TRUTHS. ^He Says the Church of Today Caters to the Xich—The Working People Hate Not Christianity, but "Churchianity"—Sound and Wholesome Doctrine. Rev. C. Ll Arnold, pastor of St. Pe­ ter's church, Detroit, preached a sermon the other Sunday which a local paper called ."a scorcher." Among other things he said in substance: The command of the Master to go and preach the gospel to every creature pre­ cludes all idea of class privileges in the blossedne&s of the new kingdom of' God, which the Saviour established in the world. The gospel is not for the rich, the poor, the Jew, the gentile, the bcwid, the free, but for all equally. The par­ tiality of the church, if there be such a thing, is reserved for the unfortunate and the oppressed classes. As a fact of her history the church consecrated the activities of the first and following cen­ turies of her life up to comparatively modern ...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

$3? "J~ t? 1'-.))I &,/' t- & VOL. 19. 4 MI m"' fe?. 1 4 A PRELATE TALKS. Archbishop Ireland Expresses Himself Regarding Present Labor Troubles. LAW AND OEDEK MUST PREVAIL. Destruction of Life and Property the Fatal Mistake of the A. R. TJ. Strike. CHICAGO, July 10.—Archbishop Ire­ land of St. Paul, being asked what he had to say upon the strike, spoke as follows: "I do not like to speak of Chicago strikes, because in so doing I shall blame labor, while because of my deep sympathies with it I should wish to nave none but words of praise for it. Yet in a momentous social crisis such as the ones through which we are passing it is a duty to speak aloud and to make avowal of the truths and principles which will save society and uphold justice and I am glad of the op­ portunity which the Associated Press aifords me. "The fatal mistake which has been made in connection with this strike is that property has been destroyed, the liberty of citizens interfered with, human lives in dang...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

$ A ft W* 8n- 41 IR-: •'-. p: The Experience of a Would* Be Tragedienne In New York. MONEY AND AMBITION SOON 00. An Engagement Xn Spectacle at 88 Per Week Instead of Starring ^t a Large Sal­ ary—A -Girl's Warning to Her Theatric­ ally Inclined Sisters. Therefireothers,'' of eourse, thousands of them, just like me, but nevertheless I wish to warn girls living in the villages and small towns against coming to New York city to get into the "show business" on the strength of the statement of the local schoolteacher that they can "speak pieces" better than any other girls in the "deestrick." Six months ago I was the subject of more violent puffery in the one daily and two weekly newspapers of my little town than I had ever seen bestowed upon any RUNNING THE GAUNTLET, one. Paragraphs filled to bursting with the most fulsome laudation were fairly belched forth at our quiet citizens in each issue of the papers. And the cause of it all? I had played Juliet. As the editors—that triumvirate of...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

r? f: 1:1' 1*S? a I ,"*) f_, V* P-v N 's«i.7 "c STRIKERS BIOTOUS Southern Pacific Officials Having a Hard Time In Resuming Traffic. ALL TRAINS HEAVILY GUARDED. An Escort of Six Hundred Militia Is Necessary to Move a Freight. SAN FRANCISCO, July 17. —The South­ ern Pacific Railroad company, backed by the combined military forces of the federal and state governments, contin­ ues to maintain a fairly satisfactory passenger service in Northern Califor­ nia but, notwithstanding this formida­ ble array, the railroad officials hare been unable to retrieve the lost man­ agement of their freight business. The passenger service, too, is by no means restored, for trains are still sidetracked at night time as a precautionary meas­ ure. In Oakland the strikers formed into several riotous mobs of 200 or 300 each. All incoming and outgoing trains were so strongly guarded that they were not interfered with, but The Fury of These Mobs fell upon such luckless non-union men as the strikers were able t...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

?£*:.- ?r" Jr- t&->' V-"{J ,\ iv' -fe :U%:'. v*? \V- ^4'1*1 XEADERS JAILED. Debs, Howard, Keleher and Hoff ere Arrested .For Contempt of Court. HEARING SET FOR MONDAY NEXT. The Men Refuse to Furnish the $3,000 Bail and Are Lodged in Jail. CHICAGO, July 18. —Eugene V. Debs, George W. Howard, L. W. Rogers and Sylvester Keleher, the officers of the A. R. U., were committed to jail by Judge Seaman in the United States circuit court for alleged violation of the in junction issued by Judges Woods and Grosscupt. The four leaders of the strike in reality went to jail in default of bail, for the court offered them their liberty until next Monday, when they will have a hearing on the charge of contempt. Their bail was fixed at $3,000 each, but the men refused to give it and the court committed them. Debs and his companions were taken to the jail by Marshal Arnold and before they left the courtroom Judge Seaman instructed the marshal to take them out of the jail at any reasonable time o...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

W?" 0 •. «V]* If- :L4&- ¥?J tev?- MOBTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. Default having been made in the payment of the sum of nine and fifty-two one 'inndredths dollars, interest, which is claimed to be due and is due at the date of this notice, upon a mort­ gage duly executed by Edwin Patch and wife, Viola A. Patch, as mortgagors, to George W. Thayer, mortgagee, dated the 18t,h day of April, 1892, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds in the county of Morrison and state of Minnesota on the 18th day of April, 1891'. at 5*30 •o'clock, p. m, in book "T" of mortgages, on page 437, and no action or proceeding having been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt, secured by said mortgage or any part thereof, notice is hereby given, that by virtue of thw power of sale contained in said mortgage the mortgage will be foreclosed by a sale of the premises described in and conveyed by said mortgage, to-wit: Lots one and two in section thirty, township one hundred and thirty-tw...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

fs **WV 5 a* K-: •V 1B1 1 r\? &V i&V g£ tlTTLE FALLS TRANSCRIPT BY THE TRANSCRIPT PUB. CO. PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. SUBSCRIPTION'. Ate y«ar........ •4txmwfltiu ree months... «Mt« #0 •••*•. JYDVEFTISING RATES LOW LITTLE FALLS. MINN FRIDAY, JULY 20, 1894. T/he Northern Pacitic is again selling tickets to all points on the line. Debs is now in jail, preferring to pese as a martyr rat her than give bail. "Many are called," but Sover­ eign can testify to the fact that very few come. The laboring men of this country have, more sense than their leaders. During the first six months of 1894 only 'five hundred and fifty miles of railroad were built in the United :States, showing the least progress^ for any similar period during the last thirty years. The threat of free trade accomplishes mueh. I O E W E Duluih News-Tribune: Demo­ cracy in :this «county and in Min­ nesota will do well this fall if they do not, like their brethren in Ore­ gon, show up fewer votes than the Populists. It s...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

WW, 'V 4 ::.• *\?W3 V!^If JOB PRINTINC TP TBMSUEIPT JOB BFFffi S NOW SUPPLIED WITH NEW MATERIAL TROUGHOUT. NEAT, CflEAP AND RAPID. FRIDAY, JULY 20.1894. 'Additional local on page ®ix. Men are at wo*k painting the new telephone poles. A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Steele on July 15. A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ale*, Lemieux this week. The street commissioner is putting in a number of new cross walks this week. United States marshals are still running on the local passenger trains. James Brown, who has been ill for several weeks, is very little improved in health. Ed^, Mahan has about all the work he can handle at his mill now, and has quite a crew at work. John Ball and Felix Bastian com­ menced harvesting their rye Friday, and have an excellent crop. Miss Olive Laforid and her Sunday school class enjoyed a picnic at Fish Lake in Agram town Tuesday. George E. Estey of Buckman. was in the city Friday. Helsays that the crops in his vicinity are greatly in need of ra...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Little Falls weekly transcript. — 20 July 1894

yf ir 7 wv I '. \r I A sN 7 8 W VV fgy One Point on County Finances. Last year, 1893, Morrison county collected for the county revenue fund $15,011.25 and issued warrants against that fund for $25,386.25. The highest rate of taxation allowed by law for county revenue, 5 mills on the dollar, was levied, and still the receipts were $10,000 less than the orders issued against the fund. If the county assessment was reduced what would be the future condition of the county? With the highesttax rate possible for county revenue, the expenses are so great that in this one item alone the county run in debt $10,000 in 1803. The receipts will decrease in the same proportion as the valuation decreases, and what hope is there of a decrease in expen­ ditures? Other counties can be run on the amount of revenue the law al­ lows them to collect, but the limit here only provides three-fifths the necessary amount. These facts should cause our taxpayers to study the situation, and see if something canno...

Publication Title: Little Falls Weekly Transcript
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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