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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES OF MISS FLORA DEHART This is a collection of memories of many people about one remarkable woman, Flora DeHart. The memories are from relatives, old friends who lived near and people who were from as far away as Kansas. Part of these memories are Miss Flora's own recollections, in her own words, thanks to a tape made by and loaned to us by Artis Caudle of High Point, North Carolina. She made the tape in 1969 on a visit to Miss Flora's home. Miss Flora Camana DeHart was born in 1889 to Jeff and Malinda Graham DeHart. She had four sisters - Lizzie (who was wife to Ed Mabry of Mabry Mill), Sis, Orie, Addie and one brother, Green DeHart. She grew up in a hollow across what is now the Blue Ridge Parkway from what is now Mabry Mill, in a log cabin. Her father, Jeff DeHart, was a Civil War veteran. When a school building was abandoned near their cabin because a new school had been built, the family moved to the school house. T...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

MISS FLORA CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22. Clifton and he said he was going to meet me there with a car and told Mrs. Clifton she could go." So Miss Flora had her first train ride. She spent a few days with the Cliftons in Thomasville and they took her to the Greensboro Regional Airport. Again I quote the tape in Miss Flora's own words about what she thought of the airport: "So we went over to the airport and saw the airplane. When Mr. Clifton told the pilots that I haven't never seen a airplane inside, they came and got a hold of me. So the pilot took me in the plane and I looked through it and came on back down and they asked me if I wanted to go to Washington D.C. and I said No! As we went on up to these two doors and they came open. I run back and said this place is hainted and I wasn't going any further. They killed themselves laughing and they finally got me through the doors and went on up to the airplane. I had never seen a door that opened when you stepped on the mat. It scared me....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 24 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 It was more than a concert, it was a rare privilege to be one of those attending the Stoneman Family Festival at Willis, Virginia in August 1983. The reason it was more than a concert was that family members from Maryland and Tennessee traveled here for a reunion. Some members of the family are professional musicians, others, though accomplished musicians, have turned to other walks of life, but all have music in their blood, the heritage of their parents, the famous pioneer of country music, Ernest V. "Pop" Stoneman and his wife, Hattie. As we arrived, another musical group was playing. It was a locally based new group called Virginia Breeze who has just made their first record. They had the audience warmed up and ready when the Stoneman's came on. There was a feeling of continuity that a new group from this area would be followed by the oldest musical family ftpm the Blue Ridge. Three generations of Stoneman's gathered to play the mus...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

Today you can drive up to Midway Grocery and Oil Company on Highway 221, near Floyd, Virginia for a tank of gas or a cold drink and a pack of nabs and it's a country community store...Right? It is by today's standards but you should have seen it when In 1933, John T. Harmon bought that piece of land. By the following spring, he and his wife, the former Lelia Akers and their family moved into a house built there and work was started on a store and service station down on the road in front of the house. The road was Highway 221, which was still unpaved at the time. The store was a log structure that was built with logs cut off of the property it stood on. John Harmon was a industrious man. Besides the store, he also had (at various times) a sawmill, the franchise for a bus that ran from Roanoke to Hillsville, helped pave Highway 221 and Oxford Street in Floyd, and hopes of a motel consisting of several separate cabins behind the store. His store was the WILDWOOD SERVICE STATION. They ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 26 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 MAKING MOLASSES WITH B. L. (Bunny) and Telia Mae Cockram are each 73 years old. They've been married for 50 years and since 1935, home for them has been their 60 acre farm in the Mountain View section of Meadows of Dan, Virginia. Telia Mae has a hundred laying hens and she sells eggs to a lot of the folks here-abouts. In addition to the 100 laying hens, she and Bunny have 50 head of cattle and 25 head of sheep. You would think that managing a 60 acre farm and all that livestock would be about all they could handle but it's not. In addition to their regular farm duties, they have taken on an additional chore this fall. They're making molasses. Now they've always made molasses but not like this year. This year, with nine acres of sugar cane planted, their days are long and hard. They expect around 30 "boilings", producing around 10 gallons of molasses each. For those of you who have never made molasses or seen it made, let me explain the ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

It was August and the sun was blazing hot. The gravel street on the "Mill-Hill 1 ' in Longview, North Carolina was coated with a powdery layer of dust. Jerry Hill and I were sitting on an old abandoned pig pen roof on a vacant lot. A mulberry tree shaded one corner of the tin roof but the part that wasn't shaded was hot as a wood stove in January. We sat there discussing various youthful interests such as frogs, caves, spooks and fast bicycles, among other topics when Jerry reached in his pocket and pulled out a lump of dirty looking brown stuff and said, "Want some?" I said, "What is it?" He looked at me with a making fun kind of look and said, "I bet you ain't never chewed no tobacco." I said, "I have." "Oh, yeah? Well why'd you have to ask what it was then?" he replied. The conversation continued with a few more "have" and "have nots" and the next thing I knew, Jerry was spliting the plug in half with a rusty old pocket knife and I was stuffing it into my mouth. The taste wasn't ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 28 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 She was born right after the turn of the century and raised on a farm. Her "schooling" ended with the fourth grade when she was twelve years old. Those days spent in a one room school still brings a smile to her wrinkled face as she recalls them. They were days of fun, spent listening to stories of far away places and learning the three "R's". Those days were over too soon but you'll never hear her say they were. By the time she was thirteen, she was working twelve hours a day in a factory and her spare time, except for Sunday's, was spent working on the farm. She was born the fourth of seven daughters to Irish and Dutch parents. They were hard working farmers and the values they instilled about God and right and wrong are still with her today. The changes she has witnessed, over more than three-quarters of a century, have not been easy for her to accept and many of them she never will. She was married at eighteen and by the time of the...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

"ROCKWELL" OF THE MOUNTAINS - ARTIST From a childhood of Appalachian poverty, Willard Gayheart has drawn from his memories to capture the very things that have given mountain people the strength to endure any adversity. His pencil drawings reflect not only the likeness of his subjects, but the fabric of the mountain spirit as well. There is a detail to each of his drawings that upon first glance, one would attribute only to photography. However, closer inspection reveals an essence that camera and film cannot reproduce. His drawing of Phipps Bourne, the Mabry Mill blacksmith known to thousands as "Festus", creates an atmosphere for the beholder where the ring of the hammer on the anvil and the smell of smoke from the forge are as vivid and real as "Festus" himself. Willard was born June 5, 1932 in the rough and tumble area outside Hazzard, Kentucky, in the isolated community of Cordia. There, on Lotts Creek, a love of mountain people and their ways was instilled in him and has never...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 30 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 Driving north from Meadows of Dan, Virginia, on the Blue Ridge Parkway, past the turn of the century water mill known as Mabry Mill, I turned left onto state road 758 and headed toward Buffalo Mountain. Old chestnut rail fences, naturally weathered buildings and rusty antique farm implements gives you the feeling of driving through an outdoor museum. To the right, majestic Buffalo Mountain stands as a silent witness and monument to the spirit of those brave, determined souls who first ventured here in search of "home". The first of them have long been gone, but the legacy they left to their offspring survives the wrath of time and storms of change of these last two hundred years. Here in the shadow of the "Buffalo", hard work and determination along with a spirit of self-reliance are still a part of everyday life. Like the majestic Buffalo, old fashion values have withstood the test of time here, without noticeable change. Turning to th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

Sherman and Velma Sutphin CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30. vvXjicj!^ Photo above: Young Sherman Sutphin Photo at Right: Geroge Moles and Velma Bolt Sutphin. (See article for information about this photograph.) WILLARD GAYHEART CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29. the past 22 years, Willard readily attributes his church as being one of the best influences on his life to date. He works six days a week, eight hours a day as a store manager, but he is quick to admit that his heart is in his drawing, not in his store. That his heart is in his drawings goes without saying for those who have witnessed his ability. The mountains have long been noted for the talent and qualities of character they evoke from their residents. Willard Gayheart exemplifies both the talent and the character of his mountain beginnings. He is primarily a self taught artist who, with his pencil, can capture the spirit of "mountain folk" on paper in a way that is, in itself, a testimony of what mountain spirit really is - a way of life th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

HEARTOF THE BLUE RIDGE r\ciinm% w^aivfup*""'" JL&urel Monthly Journal of Mountain Life Q_ MOUNTAIN MEMORIES COLLECTION # 2 FROM THE LAUREL LIBRARY March 1983 - February 1984 32 PAGES of selected Memories and Stories from THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL'S First Year Memories is what this whole special issue is all about. It is an album of mountain memories too precious to lose to passing time. This MOUNTAIN MEMORIES COLLECTION NUMBER TWO is a collection of articles taken from the first year (March, 1983 - February, 1984) of The Mountain Laurel. This is one of the old photographs we printed in the first year. The stories start on page two. The memories will go on forever... When The Mountain Laurel interviewed Mrs. Ella Boyd for an article in our May, 1983 issue, she shared some of her old photograph with us. The photograph above was one of those photographs. We printed it, along with some others, in that issue. About a week later we received a letter from a lady in Christiansburg, Vi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

OCTOBER, 1986 jLaurel * - * v ' \ts \V tt 111 r,.i ... . Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life A LIVING HEIRLOOM More precious than an heirloom handed down thru the generations is a "living heirloom" named Nellie Stevens. Better known as "Nell" she resides presently on Johnson Hollow Road in North Cove, North Carolina with her daughter Margaret. Nell was born in Mitchell County, 1893 at Bear Creek. Her age of mightiness exceeds the scripture in Psalms 90:10 "In themselves the days of our years are seventy years; and if because of special mightiness they are eighty years...," Nellie Stevens is 93 years of age. Master artists paint and photograph the very type of home that Nell was born in. A picture of their three room log homestead hangs in the den where Nell presently sits and works thru the day. Her father's name was Ed Putnam and a harder worker was not to be found. Mr. Putman worked for fifty cent a day when Nell was just a wee infant. He worked on one occassion for a Professor Wing....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1986 HEIRLOOM Continued from page 1 and when I picked up that magazine with the words of the poem, it was as good as if I'd of found a hundred dollar bill! It was nineteen hundred and two when I was eight or nine that I first learnt that poem." Seventy four years later the poem was still fresh in Nell's mind - truly a "living precious heirloom." Not only for reciting pieces is Nell noted, but for putting "pieces" together but that of a different nature. Nell sits in the restful atmosphere of her den and makes dolls for her many great grandchildren and grandchildren. She designs and sews all the clothing attire for her dolls. Nell has 21 grandchildren, 43 great grandchildren, 2 great, great grandchildren. (Pictured in the photograph are a few of the dolls she has made.) Her radio plays softly as she stitches and sews the hours away. Nell relates a story of years past when thread was something to be desired. (Today we purchase it for a slight amount of ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

Special Christmas Offer Santa's Helpers - Elves and The Mountain Laurel! Jkt §J jjf\ / \ SANTA AND HIS ELVES . ARE ALREADY BUSY PLANNING CHRISTMAS >"SFC/ PRESENTS. THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL IS ONE GIFT THAT REMINDS FRIENDS M) AND LOVE ONES THAT CLLX YOU ARE THINKING ' OF THEM ALL YEAR LONG. IT IS ALSO " V VT AFFORDABLE AND MM, STRETCHES YOUR GOOD CHEER TO SIX "~" I/ SPECIAL PEOPLE FOR ONLY $6.00 EACH. Send 6 gift subscriptions for only $36.00 (A savings of $12.00 on six, 1 year subscriptions). Go ahead, pamper yourself. Include your own name as one of the six subscriptions if you wish, new or renewal. "Share an era of mountain memories with six special friends." Our 3rd annual originally gift from: designed Mountain Laurel Christmas Card will be sent : announcing your gift. VISA - MASTERCARD # § NAME 8 NAME G J| ADDRESS 8 ADDRESS j| CITY | CITY |j 8 STATE ZIP Q STATE ZIP I m ft J Please check one: NEWD GIFTD RENEWALD Please check one: NEwQ GIFtD RENEWAL □ I NAME j NAME I ® ADDR...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1986 BICYCLING From my vantage point sitting on my front porch observing the traffic as it moves north and south on the Blue Ridge Parkway, it is sometimes interesting to note the different modes of transportation used in this modern day and age. The luxurious RV's and large travel trailers which make up a large portion of the traffic are, for all intents and purposes, homes mounted on wheels. The smaller trailers and pickup campers may not be so luxurious and homey as their larger counterparts, but they have a distanct advantage in not being so heavy and are more manuverable. Also they don't require towing a small car or carrying motorcycles (sometimes even bicycles) to use to gadabout when they reach their destinations. Vans are popular vehicles, too, for those who are inclined to travel lighter. They, too, can be used for sleeping for small families. Last but not least, we don't want to forget the motorcyles and bicycle travelers. I am more incline...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

DELAYED FUNERAL As a child I often heard of Pappy's grave filling from my grandmother and great grandmother. William Lynch Faddis (1836 - 1884) was my great grandfather. He lived in the Elk Horn section near Woodlawn, Va. This man was a Confederate Veteran and a member of a Masonic lodge. His death came following a severe January blizzard like storm. Neighbors carried the body up the steep hill to the family graveyard, which was on the family farm. Because of the severe cold weather only a few people, mostly men, attended the burial. In the absence of a minister a short Bible reading and prayer was rendered by a neighbor. The grave was only half filled. An "A" type shelter was built over the partly filled grave. On a Sunday in June, the same year, a delayed funeral service was held. Following the religious service members of the several near by Masonic lodges formed and did the grave service in a manner as if the body was being buried on that day. The family stood by while the grave...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1986 SUNSHINE TALES I sometimes wonder if I could have had the same happy childhood if I had been born in any place other than the state of Kentucky. I've heard it said that the geographic location has nothing to do with what a person is - it's what a person does with what he has that makes his life worth living. My mother and father were two very happy people and were living in a small town in the Ohio River valley in western Kentucky when I was born. I was my mother's third child. The first child, a daughter, was born when Mama and Papa were very young and she lived to be only two and a half years old when she was severely burned which resulted in her death. This was a great shock to both Mama and Papa and, as a result, Mama had a long, lingering illness which lasted many months. Several years later, my sister, Alberta, was born and two and a half years later, I was born. Then later, their first boy, Richard Henry, named after both of Mamma's brothe...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

SUNSHINE TALES Continued from page 6 "Come on, fellers. How would you like to see a rebel born?" He ordered them to take the woman off the bed and lay her on the floor, which they did. He then caught up the feather bed she was lying on and took it to a window; opened the window and slashed the bed to pieces and shook out the feathers, then laughed and rode away. The husband tried to prevent it, but he was helpless. In spite of this ill treatment, the woman gave birth to a healthy baby boy on the floor. Of course, she was properly attended and suffered no injuries. As the boy grew up, his father told him over and over of the incident. When the boy grew to be a young man, he began inquiring for a certain Mr. H—, the leader of the band of marauders. At last, one day at a public gathering of some kind, he was told that a certain very nice-looking old man was the man. He approached him and asked, "Are you Mr. H-—?" The old man said, "I am - what can I do for you?" The boy said, "I'm the ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1986 CULLER IN A WOOD PILE My grandfather, Dewey Avert Culler was a man who worked hard all his life. He was born in the Laurel Fork Community in Virginia on August 2, 1898, along with a twin brother, Samuel Lewis Culler. Dewey married Mary Elva Bowman in November of 1920 and they lived together 64 years. When they were first married, they lived with Dewey's twin brother who was married to Mary Elva's sister Edna Jane. It wasn't long before Dewey bought six and three-fourth acres which he lived on for 62 of his 64 married years. From 1930 until 1945 he farmed with a yoke of steers on land he rented. In 1945 he and his son, Elbert bought a pair of mules, but didn't keep them long. At that time, he stopped farming for a living and began a career with the Bureau of Highways. Dewey worked for Jack Chandler Construction and helped to build what is now the Blue Ridge Parkway. For five or six years he walked from his home to Fancy Gap every Monday, which was...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1986

KAOLIN CLAY As the Sunday sun fell behind the western mountains of North Carolina, the light softly dimmed and a rose glow crept across the old unpainted farmhouse, setting high on the hill above Green's Creek in Jackson County. The sixteen year old Lela Dell Brooks, braided her long dark hair and stuffed the last of her cotton dresses into a carpet bag. The slow steady pounding of horses's hooves became louder as they neared the front of the house. Lela took the bag and ran down the stairs. Out on the porch she heard the young, fair haired, John William Wilson, telling her Father, he had come to take her for his bride. After protest from Lela's Father, Swanson Brooks and tears from her Mother, Ida Ash Brooks, John took Lela's hand and lead her to the waiting buggy. Down the creek at Preacher Wesley Green's house, John and Lela were married, that summer evening of 1911. The tram line ran from the mill at Hog Rock to the Dillsboro rail road station. The clay was dug by hand, then was...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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