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Title: Western Mail Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,028,759 items from Western Mail, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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YORK RACES 1886. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

TORS RACES 1886. j The ahove races will take place ' on Easier Monday and Tuesday, 26th and 27th April. STEWARDS :-Messrs-Chas. Harper, M.L.C., E Keane, E. Hamersley, Geo. Parker, J.M, Craig, Charles Edwards, Edward Parker, P. Craig.W. L. Hoops and J- JP Hancock, JUDGE. -Mr. C. A. Paterson. STARTER :-Mr. Jas. CraigV CLERK OF THE COURSE :-. .".»' HANDICAPPER Mr- W. B-Mitchell.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SECOND DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

SECOND »AF. BBEEDEBB' PLATE, X'¿\). To start at 11-30. Sweepstake of £1 5s. to go to 2nd horse. Distance 1| miles. "Weight for age. CABNABVON CUP, £40. To start at 12. I Sweepstake of ¿£2 to go to 2nd horse. I Handicap minimum 7st. LADIES' GIFT, ¿£20. To start at 2. I Sweepstake of ¿£1 5s. to go to 2nd horse. Distance 1% miles. Weight for age. I HUEDXE RACE, ¿£25. To start at 2-45. j Sweepstake of £110a. to go to 2nd horse. Distance 1| miles, over 6 nights of hurdles, 3ft. 6io. high*. Welter weights for age. HUBBY SCOBEY, ¿£10. To start at 3-30. Sweepstake of ¿SI. Winner to be sold for ¿£10. Surplus to go to Race Fund. Selling allowance of 71b. for every ¿£5. Distance £ mile. Heats. Welter weights for age. FOECED HANDICAP, ¿£10. To start at 4-45. Sweepstake «f £1 to go to 2nd horse. Optional to losere, compulsory to the 'win- ners. Welter weights for age.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
PROGRAMME. FIRST DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

PROGRAMME. FIRST DAY. MAIDEN PLATE, ¿620. To start at 11-30. For all horses that have never won. an ad- vertised race in the Colonies. Sweepstake of £1 5s. to go to 2nd horse. Distance 1| utiles. Weight for age. PUBLICAN'S PUESE, £15. To start at 2 o'clock. Sweepstake of ¿£1 5s. to go to 2nd horse. Distance 1 raüe. Welter weights for age. SETTLER'S STAKES, ¿£50. To start at 2-30. Sweepstake of ¿£2 to go to 2nd horse. Distance l£ miles. Welter weights for age. SELLING STAKES, £15. To start at 3 p.m. Sweepstake of ¿8L. A. selling allowance of 71bs. for every reduction of ¿£5. Distance 1 mile. Heats. Welter weights for age. MILLIE MILLIE HANDICAP, ¿£20. To start at 4-30. Sweepstake of ¿61 5s. to go to 2nd horse. Distance 1¿ miles. Welter weights^ Lightest weight lOst. 51bs. No- mination £1 on night ot' entry, £1 accept- ance at scales.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Odds and Ends. Sad Condition of Marshal Bazaine. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

/ Sad Condition of Marshal Bazaine. A patbetio story ÍB told of the Prend general, Bazaine. After his ill-luck at Metz, Baraine was made the scapegoat of the French nation, and was sent into confine- ment. His esoape from the He St. Margue- rite made a great sensation at the time, and the fact that the plan of esoape was drawn out by his wife, who herself assisted in its carrying out, did not detract from the pic- turesqueness of the story. Sinoe then he hos enjoyed the favour of the ex-Empress Eugenie, but this was a short time ago with- drawn. Now, it is stated, the old gener. 1 has been deserted by his charming wife, and he is living in Madrid in a condition border- ing on destitution. Marshal Bazaine, who is in such deep poverty as to be obliged to ask private oharity from some of his old comrades in arms, has received assistance, it is said, from j several English officers of the highest rank j to whom he is personally known.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THE MIDLAND RAILWAY. [FROM MONDAY'S WEST AUSTRALIAN.] [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

THE MIDLAND RAILWAY. [FROM MONDAY'S WEST AUSTRALIAN.] TO-DAY inaugurates the beginning of one of the two great Public Works the issue of private enterprise-for which the country has been waiting in such expectation, and from which it hopes so much. The ceremony at Guildford this afternoon will sec many people's minds t at ease. When, a few years' ago, Messrs JOTJBEBT & TWOBENNY placed their land grant schemes before the public, though most people believed it did not offer the best terms which the colony might obtain-and the event uas proved they were right-it served the great purpose of attracting to- wards us the eyes of investors, and of familiarising men's minds with great proposals for developing our resources. For a time, indeed, there seemed a possibility of the colony being over- whelmed with au inundation of enthusiastic projectors But among ali these schemes but two have now survived. The Beverley-Albany and the Midland Railway alone retain any vitality and vigour. ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
HOW COSTLY FABRICS ABE CLEANED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

How COSTLY FABRICS ABE CLEANED. A careless waiter cr au accident at the dinner-table may cause thc apparent ruin of laces, silks or velvets worth large sums of money. If the lady tries to clean thom herself she makes mattera worse, and makes it impossible for the professional cleaners to do anything with them after- wards. These cleaners have peculiar methods of renovating these delicate fabrics, and many of them they will not reveal, as they are secrets of their tade. " The treatment of flue laces," said a cleaner, "is an extensive and troublesome process. A thick blanket of soft rags is sewed around a bottle, and on this the lace is pinned, lt is quite impossible to rub lace, as it would tear it to pieces. The bottle is then placed in a bath of soapy warm water. After soaking for about twenty minutes it is boiled for some time and then allowed to cool. It is dipped in several baths of clear cold- water until all the soap seems to ba re- moved. The lace is then removed from the bot...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SUMMER PRECAUTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

SUMMER PRECAUTIONS. I By Queen Bee in the Australasian.'] It is generally about this season in the 1 year-wheo the summer is on the turn that such diseases as typhoid fever, enteric fever, cholera, etc., show signs of being on the increase. Therefore it be- hoves the careful housewife to double her vigilance, to increase her guards, and to seo that her home citadel is defended at ali vulnerable points against the dreaded assailants. To do this requires constant attention and watchfulness uight and day, in season and out of season. She must never trust to others, but see for herself that the work she orders is carried out thoroughly aud conscientiously. Then, and then only, can she and her little ones sleep in peace. A word about milk to begin with. This is such an importaut article of our daily food, and its healthy condition de pends so much on the cleanliness of our dairies that I wonder a milk inspector luis not ere this been appointed by the Government, not only for the protecti...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
AMERICAN WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

AMERICAN WOMEN. í The frankness of the American young1 j women, said Archibald Forbes, has in it, . I on the threshold, a certain bewilderment i and even embarrassment for the English j male person, especially if his collars be I stiffly starched. She has so utter an ap [ parent absence of self-consciousness, i her mental equipoise is so serenely stable, her good fellowship, if one may use tho term, is so natural, that he cannot see his ? way easily to'the solution of the problem, j " I assume him," adds Mr. Forbes, " to be a gentleman ao that his intuition deters him from a misconception of the pheno- mena that confront him. Shu flirts, he finds she is an adept in flirtation, but it is a flirtation'' from tho teeth down wards,' to use Carlyle's phrase ; aud he is fain to own to himself, like the fox-hunting farmer who tried % unsuccessfully to get drunk on the claret, that he seems to ' get no f orrarder.' But although the citadel of the fortress seems to him straugcly iin pregnabl...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
WORKING WOMEN IN LONDON. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

WOBKING WOMEN IN LONDON. The number of women earniug their own living, and often assisting to keep the family, in London, says the Queen, is increasing every day. Hundreds are em- ployed in the Post office, in some of the insurance companies as cashiers and book- keepers, ia tracing engineers' plans, in type-writing, in telephone work, and cigarette making-all employments of comparatively recent date, for it is not so many years ago since the trial of female clerks in the clearing house of the Post office was thought a wonderful innovation, and one which many wise heads predicted much evil of. .There are besides, of course, the very large number of working women in the more ordinary sense-the dress makers, milliners, and shop assis- tants. Amongst the latter, perhaps, it is truest that we know little of how they live. One thing is not half enough known j about them, aud that is the large number of girls and women employed in London at a rate of payment which is quite inade- quate fo...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Midland Railway. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

Thc Midland Railway. The ceremony connected with the form- al commencement of the Midland Bail way on Monday last was altogether wer. thy of so auspicious an occasion. The weather was fute;;'»ot so" hot;aa it had been ,and somewhat cloudy, but xu»t*àf> ficiently soto throw any kind of abade upon the proceedings. There was a bril- liant assemblage of visitors to witness the - ceremony and to participate in the <d fresco entertainment provided by thai most popular of contractors, Mr. ¿BANE. The deep interest felt in the important work which was being inaugurated, join- . ed to the favoring circumstances above alluded to, contributed to give an unus- ual eclàt to the demonstration. The actual proceedings connected with the turning of the sod were perhaps tame and incommensurate with the "importance of the work and the anticipations ef fu- ture usefulness. Turning a sod or lay- ing a foundation stone are not in them- selves very imposing ceremonies. Not- withstanding this ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Western Mail. SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 1886. THE SETTLERS IN THE RAILWAY RESERVES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

% iEístmt Patt SATURDAY, MARCH. 6, 1886. THE~SETrLERS IN THE RAIL- WAY RESERVES. THE pageant of Monday last, if we may dignify by so distinguished a name the interesting but unassuming ceremony of turning the first sod of the Midland Railway, roust have aroused varying reflections in the minds of the spectators. Predotni mant over all must have been the feeling of satisfaction. It is true that a certain party in the community still remains more than dubious as to the effect upon the country in the future of these great land grant schemes. They have always before their eyes the experience of these railways in other countries, where the peso have been not altogether a matter ^advantage. There is jet anotl party which continues ohstinat sceptical as to the financial comp enoy of the Syndicates to carry < their undertakings. But above a beyond all there is the much grea body, forming indeed the majority the population, who insist on the vt benefits we may expect from the coi ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
DEATH IN THE BUSH. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

DEATH IN THE'BUSH. Au inquest was held on Thursday after- noon in the Perth Police Court, betöre Mr. G. C. Knight, J. P., ou the remain* of a man unknown, found in Muddy Beach, at the Canning, on Wednesday. The jury, which consisted of Mr. H. Strick- land (foreman), Mr. John A. findlay, and Mr. Forster, visited the remains of the deceased, which bad been removed to the hospital. Nothing but the bones re- mained, and they had the appearance of having recently been charred by a bush, fire. Only a small portion of the cloth- \ ing adhered to the bones, but the shoes of the dead man were intact. The re- mains had not definitely been identified, although it was surmised that they Were those of James Goddard, a boatman who waB lost in July last. A young man named Fareham Shearn said that on Wednesday he went out to Muddy Reach swamp to see whether the dividing fence between his father's land and. that of Mr. Watt had OBen damaged by a recent bushfire. About twenty yards west of the fence ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
OUR GERALDTON LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

: - OUR GERALDTON LETTER. Mr. Ewart, the Chairman of the Wad- dington Railway Syndicate, visited oe this week. His visit was only a flying one, but through tho courteous attention of Mr. T. Burges, M.L.C., he was able to see a good extent of our immediately sur- rounding country. He was also enabled to decide upon the merita of the rival railway routes to Walkaway, and I am glad to say decided for the Jttack Flats. Mr. Ewart's trip iucluded a visit to Glen- garry, which valuable station is now in the market. To the credit of its manager, Mr. John Finnerty, be it said, that the Inspector of Sheep has at last given it a. clean sheet, aud not a 6pot of scab is to be seen ou the station. I have already telegraphed you some particulars of the tragedy at Willow Gully, and, although harrowing iu the j extreme, I will tell yon the tale as nearly as possible, in the words of an eye-witness. It appears that early on Sunday morning last a bush fire was Been in uncomfortable proximity to the st...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
WEEKLY COMMERCIAL REPORT. PERTH WHOLESALE PRICES CURRENT. Perth, March 5, 1886. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

WEEKLY COMMERCIAL REPORT. PERTH WHOLESALE PRICES CURRENT. Porth, Mardi 5, 1886. Nothing of importance has occurred since our last article. Prices for produce are mostly well maintained, though a large parcel ot bacon sold without reserve at auction only brought au average price of Sd. A parcel of «baff was yielded at 3s. 6d. per cwt. We are glad to find that dealers are rejecting all paroels of chaff, which they find have been damaged. Any trick of trade more destruc- , tive of the grower's reputation and detri menta1, to the condition of the article operated on ca-mot be imagined. Our best farmers have long acknowledged the fallacy of tho idea that hay requires damping to make it draw through the rollers of thc chaff cutter, but week after week baleB of chaff are brought to Perth, the interior of which is simply in a state of fer- mentation through the damping it has under- gone. It ie our duty to repeat our convie tion, which has hitherto Veen unchallenged that j damping of hay, b...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
COMMERCIAL. HELMUTH SCHWARTZ & Co.'s WOOL REPORT. LONDON, 19th Jan., 1886. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

COMMERCIAL. HELMÜTH SCHWARTZ & CO.'B WOOL REPOST. LONDON, 19th Jan., 1886. The first series of London sales of Colonial wool commenced to-day. There is » good attendance of both Home and Foreign buyers and fair competition. As far as can be judged from one day's cat- alogues, comprising a somewhat indifferent selection of wool, prices show no material change from the closing ratee of last series. In the case of really good Australian greasy wools the former level is firmly maintained, but the market is rather weaker for inferior and faulty grease and for the lower classes of scoured. The few lots of crossbreds offered met with strong demand and sold higher than in December. Cape wools realised on Jfche whole fermer prices, any difference, however, being in buyers' favour. The arrivals in time comprise 245,000 bales, (212,000 bales Australian and 33,000 bales Cape). Deducting 39,000 bales for- warded direct, but adding 18,000 bales held over from last sales, the total availab...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Shipping. ARRIVALS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

ABBIVALS. Marali 2nd, THERESA, schooner, Miller, master, from Bunbury ; PLANET, schooner, Mackay, master, from Dongarra. DEPABTUBES. March 1. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN, S.S.; G. Calder, master, for Albany, ria intermediate ports. Saloon passengers : Messrs. A. W. Arm- strong, J. Brockman, C. Brockman, Miss M. j Bull, Mr. T. Lee, Mrs. E. Stone, Mr. A. Parry, Mr. and Mrs. Gardener and 2 children, Miss Spencer, Mr. B. W. Lowe, Mr. Atkins. For Albany, Mr. Price Williams, Mr. and Mrs. M* Ardle, Mr. and MrB. Merry, Messrs. S. A. Bawder, F. Fox, Mrs. Clarke, Miss Clarke, Miss Boyle, Mrs. Foster, Miss M. Lockyer, Miss B. Lockyer, Miss E. Lefroy, Mr. S. G. Batcher, and 3 in steerage. March 1. IBIS ; Shaw, master, for Singa- pore. February 27th, MAST BLAIR, barque; Aitkins, master, for Port Augusta, S.A. cargo, jarrah. February 27th, BILLE OF BUNBURY, schooner, Miller, master, for Bun- bury and Tasse. r March 1st CATALINA, barque, 484 tons. Jno. Pilkington master, from London, ll Emigrants. March 2nd,...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Climatic Extremes—Wet and Dry. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

Climatic Extremes-Wet and »ry. Br CEDIPÜS. That one half ot the world does not know how the other half lives is true in respect to a great many things, and in no matter more emphatically than the distribution of water. The crofter of Skye cannot imagine the possibility of having too much sunshine, while the Arab of Sahara is incapable of re- cognising the fact that there can be too much rain. And yet they are both con- tented in their way, not being cognisant of any other state of things than that which conies wit nih the runge of their respective experiences. In the latitude of Skye, the agriculturist would probably find an inch of rain in spring and another iu summer quite sufficient for the whole of the year, whereas he is blessed with seventy or eighty inches, or about thutyfivft times more than enough. The desert Arab, on the other hand, would not find eighty inches, or even 180 too much, whereas his actual allowance is per- haps not more than two. Without disput- ing the truth...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Fruit Canning. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

Fruit Canning, Upon the prospects of fruit canning in Australia the following practical letter has been written by Mr, Hanna, the manager of the Clare Fruit Preserving Company, South Australia. Mr. Hanna says:-"The fact is acknowledged by all those interested in the fruit preserving and jam making industries that, through the excessive com. petition of the present day, firms who manufacture a good article from sound fruits can only manage to exist by means of the closest attention to economy in produc- tion. Further, these industries are increas- ing in importance year by year, and, like other industries, must fall into the hands of the larger houses or companies who have the command of sufficient capital to bring the resources of modern machinery to bear upon the different processes employed, so as to produce the manufactured article at the least possible cost. For until this point is reached we need not expect to succeed in securing a permanent outlet for our goods ic foreign mark...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Peach Culture. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

Peach Culture. The deterioration of the peach in this colony is a matter of great regret, for it is so easily grown, and when well grown tbis fruit will hold its place in comparison with any other as a useful addition to our food re- sources, and is moreover both wholesome and luscious. The chief fact that it is so easily grown is one, if not the chief, reason of its deterioration, because it grows so readily from seed that the stones are sown by every cottage gardener. The consequence is that the market is flooded with fruit absolutely mere abortions in flavour, colour, and size as compared with what a true peach should be. Another cause ot' deterioration is doubtless that the excessive growth of young wood makes the old rules of pruning useless unless a system of root-pruning is carried on aa well, and this.is seldom done. Then, again, the depredations of the flying-fox are always directed in force against the peach orchard. But perhaps the principal reason ii that the fly that la...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Orchard. Pullenvale Vineyard. [BY OUR AGRICULTURAL REPORTER.] [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 6 March 1886

Pullenvale Vineyard. [BT QUE AGBICUIVTUBAI. BEPOBTÏB.1 I The following description of a Queensland i vineyard from the Queenslander will interest those of our readers who may experience much the same soil and climate : It is more than twenty years ago that Mr. Pullen bought this little farm of 37 acres and decided to devote it to grape growing. The spot chosen is upon the Upper Kedron Brook, and adjoins the vineyard until lately owned by Mr. Nicholson There are several practical lessons to be learned from Mr. Pol- len's success which may be useful to those who have intentions of grape growing. In- stead of choosing the hill-side for his vines, as is the almobt invariable custom around Brisbane, he has planted the level flat land. The soil is an alluvial of great depth, more or less a sandy loam of every colour, from white to brown or red. It was slightly undu- lating, with swamps on it, and the creek winda round and through it. Much labour has been expended in the course of the twen...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
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