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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LAW OF TIED HOUSES. IMPORTANT DECISION BY THE HOUSE OF LORDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

LAW OF "TIED" HOUSES.   IMPORTANT DECISION BY THE HOUSE OF LORDS. A point of the highest importance to brewers and licensed victuallers has been definitely decided in the House of Lords by a court com- posed of the Lord Chancellor and Lords Mac- naghten, Davey, Brampton, Lindley, and Ro- bertson. The case was that of Noakes and Co., Limited, T. George V. Rice, and it raised a curious ques- tion regarding the rights of mortgagees of "tied" public-houses. In 1897 Mr. Rice acquired from Messrs. Noakes, who are brewers, of Bermondsey, the King's Arms, at Camberwell. The brewers advanced him a part of the purchase money on mortgage, on condition that be should sell no malt liquors except theirs. The following year Mr. Rice gave Messrs. Noakes notice of his intention to pay off the mortgage, provided they were willing to re- lease him from the covenant. They refused to do so, and Mr. Rice brought an action seek- ing for a declaration that on payment of the money due he was en...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PROFITS OF A CIRCUS. NEARLY £70,000 EARNED BY BARNUM AND BAILEY LAST YEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PROFITS OF A CIRCUS. NEARLY £70,000 EARNED BY BAR- NUM AND BAILEY LAST YEAR. Everybody loves a circus, and most people   are more or less interested in knowing what   the profits of a circus amount to. Some light   was thrown on this subject a month ago at   the annual meeting of Barnum and Bailey,   Limited, the proprietors of the "greatest show   on earth."   During the past 12 months the circus has   been on tour through Austria, Germany, Hol-   land, and Belgium. The gross receipts amount-   ed to do less than £296,248, while the expenses   were £228,153.   There was, therefore, the handsome profit   of £68,934 on the year's working, which en-   abled the directors to pay a dividend of 10 per   cent. on the capital of £400,000, to place £30,000   to a suspense account to mee...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LAYING IN SUPPLIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

LAYING IN SUPPLIES. Employer; "How does it come you get around to the office so late these mornings?"   Employee: "Well, we get up later than usual   at our house these days; you see, we're going to   give our little boy a horn and a drum, so we're   trying to get ahead on sleep." —"Boston Post."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Britain's Strangest Warship. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Britain's Strangest Warship. A sky view of H.M.S. Excellent, the most singular warship in the world.   Years ago it was a mere mudbank off Portsmouth, but it has been turned into a naval depot and appears in the Admiralty list as a warship.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT THEY DO ON BOARD H.M.S. EXCELLENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

WHAT THEY DO ON BOARD H.M.S. EXCELLENT. —♦— The most novel warship in existence appears on the Admiralty list. It is known as H.M.S. Excellent, but H.M.S. Excellent never weighs anchor, never gets up steam with Belleville or   any other boilers, and has never left these shores in search of any enemy. The ship as a ship, in fact, does not exist. H.M.S. Excellent is an Admiralty fiction. The name has been bestowed upon what was 30 years ago a mere mudbank off Portsmouth, but which now, owing to the exertions of the "handy man," is the most perfectly equipped gunnery estab- lishment in the world. On H.M.S. Excellent—or Whale Island, as it is sometimes called—the armor plates for Bri- tish warships are tested. Special proof butts have been built for this purpose. For its sup- ply of armor plates the Admiralty relies en- tirely upon the enterprise of private firms. When a firm have produced something they deem an advance upon the product of their rivals they send it on board...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Seeing by Telephone. A NEW INVENTION WHICH IT IS STATED ANNIHILATES SPACE. ONE MILLION STERLING FOR THE FRENCH RIGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Seeing by Telephone. A NEW INVENTION WHICH IT IS STATED ANNIHILATES SPACE.   ONE MILLION STERLING FOR THE FRENCH RIGHTS. Dr. Sylvestre, a dentist established in Paris, has just completed an invention styled the "Spec- tograph," which, he declares, if fastened on to an ordinary telephone, enables the two people in communication to see as well as to hear one another. Dr. Sylvestre is an American. He preferred, however, when the London "Evening News" re- presentative called on him in Paris to converse in French. "There is no reason," said Dr. Sylvestre, "why as soon as telephonic cables are established with New York, we should not see our friends there as easily as I see you. I have already seen the Mar- seilles telephone exchange from this room by means of my apparatus, and I have chatted by te- lephone with M. Mougeot, the French Postmaster General and watched his astonishment as I de- scribed his appearance, clothes, and office to him as we talked. There was a good deal...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW FABRICS WERE NAMED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

HOW FABRICS WERE NAMED. —♦— About 15 miles from Norwich (England) is a place named Worsted. It was here that the double thread of woollen, afterwards called wor- sted, was first made, if not invented. Travellers in Brittany, as they pass Guingamp, seldom re- member that the useful fabric, gingham, was pro- duced there. Muslin takes its name from Mussoul, a fortified town of Asiatic Turkey; and tulle owes its ap- pellation to Tulle, in France. Linsey-woolsey was first made in Linsey, this was a very popular   fabric for a long time. Kerseymere takes its   name from a village in Suffolk—Kersey—and the   mere close to it.   Gauze—at one time called gaze—derived its   name from Gaza, in Palestine, the gates of which   were carried away by Samson. Calico comes to us as a name from Calicut, in India, where calico was printed, and which was celebrated for its   cotton cloth. Damask is derived from Da...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PECULIAR POSTAGE STAMPS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PECULIAR POSTAGE STAMPS.   Mecklenburg-Schwerin has a postage stamp     which is probably unique. Its value is about a     penny, but the stamp is perforated so that it can     be divided into four portions, any one of which     may be used for conveying a letter a certain dis-     tance. This is the only place in the world   where such stamps are in use.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Marconi's Marvel. TO SEND CORONATION MESSAGES ACROSS ATLANTIC. REPLIES TO CRITICISM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Marconi's Marvel. TO SEND CORONATION MESSAGES ACROSS ATLANTIC. —♦— REPLIES TO CRITICISM. Mr. Marconi's announcement that he has re-   ceived signals from the Lizard at St. John's,   Newfoundland, by his wireless system of tele-   graphy was the subject of much comment, ad-   verse and otherwise, in New York.   The general attitude was in favor of sus-   pense of judgment until further tests are made.   Mr. Marconi says that he received the signal,   consisting of the three dots of the Morse code,   signifying the letter "S," seven times on Friday.   The instruments, which were of an extremely   sensitive nature, had to be continually re-   adjusted, and on that account the message, had   it not been pre-arranged, would have been un-   intelligible, because portions of the signal were   omitt...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BRILLIANT FIREBALL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A BRILLIANT FIREBALL.   —♦— One of the largest meteoric fireballs of recent years (says the "Daily Graphic") passed over   the English Channel, in the immediate region of the coast of Dorset and Hampshire, on the evening of Wednesday. December 4 last, at 5.36 p.m. For a moment it lit up the country with a splendor exceeding that of the full moon, and many people were startled at the sudden and brilliant nature of the spectacle. In the central parts of England the fireball was seen to pass   slowly and majestically down the southern sky,   travelling from west to east, and its whole flight   occupied about four seconds. The head was bluish green, and it projected a dense red streak of luminous debris along the brighter portion of its path, and this remained visible for several minutes. Though a great number of descriptions of the phenomenon have been published, there are very few of them which are of utility for investi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CYCLE RACE PROFITS. PROMOTOERS £10,000, RIDERS LESS THAN £1000. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

CYCLE RACE PROFITS. PROMOTERS £10,000, RIDERS LESS THAN £1000.   The six days' cycle race, which was concluded in New York on December 4, did not come up to popular expectations either in the matter of the ground covered or in the exhibition of hor- rors which previous races have afforded. The winners—Walthour and M'Eachern—were 178 miles behind best previous time, and all the competitors finished in fair condition. The majority of them, indeed, gained in weight from two to four pounds. Julius, who had previously fallen asleep and had to be taken off the track, in attempting to continue fell and broke his collar-bone. That was the worst accident.   During the final efforts the riders had recourse to drugs, cocaine and strychnine being used to stimulate their flagging energies. The promoters of the race made a good thing out of it. The attendances amounted to 100,000, and the receipts to £15,000, yielding a net profit of £10,000. The riders take in prizes le...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO JUDGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

NO JUDGE. An Irishman, taking home a goose for his Sun- day dinner, went into an inn for refreshment. Laying down the goose, he was proceeding to satisfy his thirst when a seedy-looking individual, seizing the goose, made off.       Pat at once started after him, and ere running very far had his man by the neck. "What did yez take the bird for?" queried the irate Irishman.     "Sure," said the seedy-looking man, "I took it for a lark." "Did yez?" returned Pat; "begorra, ye'd make a bad judge at a bird show."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ELECTRIC WALKING-STICKS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

ELECTRIC WALKING-STICKS. Walking-sticks have been coming in for a good deal of attention lately, and among the various   ones, carrying cigars, pencils, and the like in   their handles, the electric-light stick is un- doubtedly the most novel and useful. In the hollow tube is secreted a small electric bat- tery, and by pressing a tiny button a brilliant light streams forth from the round glass   knob at the top protecting the wire. When the light is switched off nothing is more ordinary than this stick with its glass top, but this in- genious contrivance becomes invaluable to those accustomed to long walks in the country or through badly-lighted thoroughfares, and is proving to greatly lessen the difficulty of finding a suitable present for a man.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POLAR RESEARCH. THE BALDWIN-ZIEGLER EXPEDITION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

POLAR, RESEARCH.     —♦—     THE BALDWIN-ZIEGLER EXPEDI- TION. Mr. Baldwin sailed on a three-years' voyage of discovery in North Polar regions from Tromso, in Norway, in July last. The expedition, which consists of three per- fectly-equipped vessels, has been financed by MR. W. ZIEGLER,   The Chicago Millionaire.   Mr. W. Ziegler, the well- known Chicago million- aire. Mr. Baldwin's prin- cipal ship is the converted steam whaler American. He professes every confi- dence in the success of his expedition. It is hoped that at least   traces may be discovered of the unfortunate Herr Andree. Including the Baldwin, there are now four exploring parties in Arctic waters. Lieut. Peary, with companions, is in Grinnell Land, or nearer the Pole. Dr. Robert Stein and com- panions are in Ellesmere Land, and Captain   Sverdrup, in the famous Fram, is supposed to   be near Northern G...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A JOB. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A JOB. "What is your occupation?" asked the attorney. "I haven't any," the witness answered. "I work in a boiler faetory." "We'll, don't you call that an occupation?"   "No, sir. I call it that a job."   —Chicago "Record-   Herald."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT'S THE SCORE? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

WHAT'S THE SCORE? Juat now, of all the fools I've seen, He is the greatest one, I ween, That meets you with an eager mein,   And shouts out "What's the score." You meet him in the tram and train, In every street, down every lane; He seems a being far from sane, Who shouts out "What's the score?" He stands at every stopping-place; He knows the tram is running late, But sure the guard will have to wait If he asks "What's the score?" The little chap just put in pants. Forgetting toys the doorway haunts. For Jack from school to get a glance, To ask him ''What's the score?" Jack all day long's been in a fret. Regarding not the master's threat   For careless work the stick he'll get. To find out "What's the score." The smallest boy, the sturdiest lad, The boldest man, the meanest cad. The honest man, the dark footpad (Is it just fashion, or a fad),   They look all comers in the eye, And on tip-toe excited cry, Hi! tell us, "What's the score." January...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BOBS' ADVICE TO THE CADETS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

BOBS' ADVICE TO THE CADETS. Lord Roberts recently paid his first visit as Commander-in-Chief to the Royal Military Col- lege at Sandhurst. Addressing the cadets, Lord Roberts asked them to remember that they were about to enter a noble profession which had taken a most im- portant part in the making and consolidation of this great Empire. If any of them would rise to distinction, or ever become famous as soldiers, they must make up their minds to work hard from the very day they entered the army. They must endeavor to master all the details of a soldier's life. They should also enter into their men's games and do all they could to make them as comfortable in barracks as circumstances would permit. Moreover, they should never let their men use oaths or filthy words, for soldiers quickly dis- covered who amongst their officers took interest in them, and whom they could respect and trust.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY THE SONG WAS BEST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

WHY THE SONG WAS BEST. —♦— Mrs. Porter Paddock, the Americas soprano,   tells of a time when she sang at a concert at the   Five Points Mission. After the entertainment   was over, a little girl came up to the singer and   spoke to her.   "I liked your song best of all," she said.   Mrs. Paddock was naturally pleased at this   spontaneous tribute, and asked the child why she had liked the song better than any other.   "Why," was the answer, "you had the sparkliest     rings.''             A correspondent writes to the "Natal Witness"   that recently a private of the York and Lancaster   Regiment, stationed at Charlestown, was struck by lightning and rendered totally blind. Three   days later he was struck by another flash, and &nbsp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE "RED HOUSE." AN EAST END "PUBLIC-HOUSE WITHOUT BEER." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

THE "RED HOUSE." AN EAST END "PUBLIC-HOUSE WITHOUT BEER." After long and anxious endeavor, the Rev. Harry Wilson, vicar of St. Augustine's, Commer- cial-road, London, was able on Saturday, Decem- ber 14th, to invite the public to witness the formal opening of the "Red House," which has been erected in the main road not far from his church. This building, which is in many respects unique, has cost £10,000, of which the last £1000 has yet to be subscribed. It is, in Mr. Wilson's words, "a genuine public-   house without beer, with a bar and tap-room which will be kept open till half-past 12 at night, just the same as the public-houses." With the exception that tea and coffee urns take the place of beer engines, the appointments and arrangements are similar to those of the or- dinary licensed house, and a notice over the cen- tral entrance affirms that it is "a good pull up for bishops." There is a large "coffee room" in the rear, where   cheap meals will be p...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOMEN NOT WANTED. TO BE ELIMINATED FROM THE FRENCH POST-OFFICE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

WOMEN NOT WANTED. TO BE ELIMINATED FROM THE FRENCH POST-OFFICE. M. Millerand has presented a report to the, President of the French Republic in which he proposes the gradual elimination of women from the service of the French Post-office. Since the initiation of the feminine service in 1893 the department has been very carefully watched, and the experience of eight years has demonstrated numerous shortcomings, notably the physical inaptitude of the majority of women for certain parts of the work. From the financial point of view the employ- ment of women in post and telegraph offices is not of great advantage, as three women are neces- sary to replace two men. During the year 1897 the working female staff, numbering 5470, received 161,013 days' leave, or an average of 30 days per employee. Women do not seem suited to the special du- ties, so heavy, so difficult, and so irregular, to which they have been admitted. M. Millerand proposes to open up more outlets for the existing staff, ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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