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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

''fflfiKfflPWr '; fyffl?' f 7777'Tt"'Trr''T' ?"& -rji v ' The Indian Advocate. 228 - - carry his horses over the intervening distance. Throughout ', ' . the whole region great scarcity of water prevails; in the large valleys during most of the year there is none, and it is only L ' in the mountain districts that there is a permanent supply; , but there life is almost impossible during the winter. This condition has had much to do with the migratory habits of the people, or rather with their frequent moving from place to r, ,, place; for they are not a nomadic people as the term is usually , employed. This is one of the reasons why the Navaho have ' , no fixed habitations. ' , - - San Juan river forms a short section of the northeastern r'- boundary of the Navaho country, and this is practically the only perennial stream to which they have access. It is of Xi ' little use to them, however, as there are no tributaries from the southern or reservation side, other than the Chaco and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

229 The Indian Advocate, tev which the Navahd deems essential is procured. On the west ern slope of the mountains and in the canyons and cliffs of the high table-lands which form the western part of the reser vation, the water supply, while still scanty, is abundant as compared with the eastern part. In the mountains themselves there are numerous small streams, some of which carry water nearly all the year; while here and there throughout the re gion are many diminutive springs almost or quite permanent in character. Most of the little streams rise near the crest of the mountains and, flowing westward, are collected in a deep canyon cut in the western slope, whence the water is dis charged into Chinlee valley, and traversing its length in the so-called Rio'de Chelly, finally reaches San Juan river. But while these little streams are fairly permanent up in the mountains, their combined flow is seldom sufficient, except in times of flood, to reach the mouth of Canyon Chelly and Chinle...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

r55?S5w535?r3p5S ywws- ;n,FT,''73?T13?'wy"ar The Indian Advocate. 230 cept along a few .routes which have been established here and there, Wagon travel is extremely difficult and often impossible. It is not unusual for a wagon to travel 50 or 66 miles between two points not 20 miles distant from each other. The high mountain districts are characterized by a heavy ,. growth of giant pines, with firs and spruce in the highest parts, and many groves of scrub oak. The pines are abund ant and make excellent lumber. Going downward, they merge into pinons, useful for firewood but valueless as timber, and these in turn give place to junipers and cedars, which are found everywhere throughout the foothills and on the high ' mesa lands. The valleys proper and the low mesas which bound them, are generally destitute of trees; their vegetation consists only of sagebrush and greasewood, with a scanty growth of grass in favorable spots. To the traveler in the valley the country appears to con sist ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

U"c v?77ws,SfpT!nJrK's rvlFyp9KmiWpV: y 231 The Indian Advocate. sufficient moisture to nourish the grass and herbage for a time; but most of the water finds its way directly into deep-cut channels and thence in heavy torrents to the deep canyons of the San Juan and the Colorado, where it is lost. A small portion of the rainfall and much of the snow water percolates the soil and the porous sandstones which compose the region, and issues in small springs along the edges of the mesas and in the little canyons; but these last only a few months, and they fail in the time of greatest- need in the hot summer days when the grass is dry and brittle and the whole country is parched. The direct dependence of the savage on nature as he finds it is nowhere better illustrated than on the Navaho res ervation. In' the three essentials of land, water, and vegeta tion, his country is not an ideal one. The hard conditions under which he lives have acted directly on his arts and indus tries, on his ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

H" X r "!f5555!?ir't,f tip? nnrT ' va,r,"rvr;7?s''''vF; The Indian Advocatf. 232 REV. D. CONSTANTINE POURCIN, 0. S. B. FROM "GENEALOGY AND BIOGRAPHY OK OKLAHOMA." One of the poets gave utterance to a sentiment which undoubtedly finds an echo in the hearts of millions of the human family: "I care not what his name nor what hij creed, For he who helps me in my hour of need Hath done a work Mr God and placed his mme Beond the reach of what the world calls fame " When reviewing the grand work which Father Constan tlne Pourcin is doing among his people, and when looking backward along the pathway he has pursued, even an enemy to him, should there be one, must acknowledge that he has been animated by genuine love for his fellow-nun and 'that he Zl&2im'fMjic3j&, a. W - xt '-' vi $M

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

;wpiiWTpyjW.TgrfTrMar-, vv--rvr-ir t ? "TWaf ""ffiyT r?W?f ?" w 233 The Indian Advocate. has earnestly striven to help and uplift them in every pos sible way. He possesses great talents and a wide, sympa ' thetic nature, and thus he enters into the sorrows and joys of f every one of his flock, and, in return, is beloved by the high ' and the lowly. f The family whence Father Pourcin sprang has long been numbered among the mercantile class of Marseilles, France. His father, Stephen Pourcin, was a native of that flourishing city and for many years he was occupied in business at Aix, Provence Bouches-du-Rhone, near Marseilles. He attained the age of fifty-six, his death taking place in 1882. His wid ow, who is still a resident of the city mentioned, bore the maiden name of Mary Clotilda Guyen, and her father was a merchant of Aix, her birthplace. Her elder son, Jean Bap tiste, is a successful commission merchant in Marseilles, and her only daughter, Mrs. Louise Quintran, is the wife of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

TgT r-TfW'H'w'n i-!rnjjrvjr : The Indian Advocate. 234 that parish. In 1895 he came to the United States, and for about three years was connected with the Sacred Heart Abbey in Pottawatomie county, Okla., being appointed pastor of Sacred Heart parish. While laboring in that field he suc ceeded in organizing a thriving congregation and built a sub stantial house of worship. Since Easter, 1898, Father C. Pourcin has been estab lished as pastor of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in El Reno, in addition to which he is in charge of churches at Fort Reno, Calumet and Geary. In the early history of El Reno, when but two Catholic families dwelt here, the church was organ ized, and from that day the congregation has steadily grown, until to-day there is a membership of about six hundred souls. The immediate predecessor of our subject was Father Germanus, also a member of the Benedictine Order, and now pastor of the Shawnee parish. The prosperous school, which was founded here in 1899 by the ind...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

235 The Indian Advocate. , a & THE CHURCH IN GERMANY DURING THE PAST CENTURY. concluded krom our jum numbfr. As Bishop Krementz had not recalled his sentence of ex communication against the two heretic Braunsberg teachers, he was thrown into prison for high treason. The other bish ops demanded freedom of conscience, to which the Govern ment replied by the imprisonment of the Bishop of Trier and also of the Archbishop of Cologne. Bismarck "deposed" Archbishop Ledochowski ot Gnesen-Posen. A number of priests were also imprisoned for expressing sympathy with their bishops. The persecution knew no bounds. A number of ladies of high social rank had sent a testimonial to the imprisoned Archbishop of Cologne, for which they were heavily fined. The Government introduced its own clergymen into the Catholic churches in the place of the imprisoned rightful par ish priests. All foreign priests and nuns were sent out of the country, and in one case the people.were forced, by means of police,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

-w J t" " The Indian Advocate. 236 n 4 . s ii-i bishops were imprisoned. The Bishop of Trier was fined 4,570. Protestant teachers and catechisms were forced upon the Catholic children. A priest was imprisoned for rec ommending devotion to the Sacred Heart. Pius IX showed his admiration for the German Catholics by sending the Pallium to Archbishop Ledochowski whilst in prison. Several bishops went to Rome and warrants were issued against them for this "arrogance." Pius died and Leo XIII, who succeeded him, informed William I of the fact. The latter had just been shot at by a socialist, and exclaimed: "Gebt dem Volke die Religion wieder" (Give back religion to the people). William was a pious man. He had not the grace of tlie true faith, but he lived "in the fear of the Lord." Whatever happened to the Church in Germany it would be a mistake to accuse Emperor William I of a single misdeed against Catholics. The Empire is governed by Parliament and the Imperial Chancellor, and the power...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

7P?7?F?n3 237 The Indian Advocate. been arrived at." In 1889, Emperor William II visited the Pope. He wished to make the visit in such a manner that the Quirinal might not be offended. He therefore paid his visit from the German Embassy in his own carriage, which had been brought from Berlin. To show, however, that he did not mean to make obeisance to the Pope he appeared, in military uniform. When visiting the Pope it is customary to kiss his slipper. The King of Sweden, a staunch Protestant, had not done this when visiting His Holiness. He had shaken hands. The Emperor went further. He embraced the Pope. The Empress dressed in white. Papal court etiquette prescribes black dress. This matter of etiquette, however, would have created no offence. The German Emperor likes to do things out of the common. But, again, Bismarck's intrigues very pearly spoilt the game. The Pope had retired with the Em peror into his private apartments. They were alone. This was an extraordinary privilege a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

" '&Sffiygwy w' p FHWf,wfW WT&F "''rsBwynsyaf W v wi tfy The Indian Advocate. 238 - THE INDIAN ADVOCATE t - Published by the Benedictine Fathers of 1 ! .- SACRED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. , A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosar, St Michael and St Benedict Approved b Rt Re.'lhen Meerschnert, Virar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories TKH5IS UV RUHHCIUITIONi Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . . .75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Strond cl iss Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoni i i'nrvn.i:oK8i 1. Kver Subscriber and Hencfactor will ptrticipite n all tlie merit. praers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Ablie. 2 A "solemn High Mass is sung eer First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred I Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors Y 3 A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturdn) of the month for our departed ? J Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

jr" 'Tfrvftvff"; r"TP,5 239 The Indian Advocate. , The Senate of France is now considering the proposed law to despoil and disband the religious associations in that country, and will probably pass it. On a test vote for "urgency," 176 Senators went with the Waldeck Rousseau cabinet and 96 opposed the motion. That vote portends the passage of the bill. This bill is strongly denounced by emi nent French thinkers as a disastrous piece of legislation. Their verdict may be resumed in that of Mr. Francois Coppee, the well-known writer, who declares that jt ''outrages the most elementary equity. It dares to forbid a father to bring up his children according to his conscience, and to prevent religious men and women, who are proprietors, like other people, from holding property with any security The sup pression of liberty throws us back half a century, whilst the attacks on the rights of property pushes us on to anarchy. All this is monstrous, and the comparative indifference with which th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

yVyWJBJRWT"' y,nwv.'jf1 'WdBT '(('fW'T-T'" . iy'T- r v -wt tts.-tw jftv r-yy--jrj!irri;w-A The Indian Advocate. 240 the teachers are Christian, and the law-makers are supposed to be Christian. But it will be said: 'We want no union of Church and State.' Why? Is it a crime for the State to aid the Church? Does not the Church, unasked, aid the State? Remove the Church, and what becomes of the State? Why, then, should not the State reciprocate? " To exempt t people who build and support their own schools from the burden of double taxation which they are now paying for education, or to give them back in subsidies a part of their own money, is not a union of Church and State. The doing of this would simply be an act of justice to 15,000,000 of Americans, a very large and efficient portion of the popula tion. In many cities and towns Catholics are the majority of the inhabitants. Surely they deserve some consideration for all they are doing to prevent the spread of anarchy and so cialism....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

rjc Hi;1 .,, , ,.J ,, ,.B 241 The Indian Advocate. '"VjPWTTV"?' ,fvCrf'' "' f t A PLEA FOR ACTIVITY. To Uplift, to Aid, to Amelio- i vr. Tii!- : i.n Idle TTiuiiga 1 ilia la nib Mission of Catholics. Bv Ahchbisiioh Ikpland I 4 -- The strength of the Church to-day in all countries, par ticularly in America, is the people. Ours is essentially the age of democracy. The days of princes and of feudal lords are gone. In America we have no princes, no hered itary classes. Still there is danger that in America there be formed a religious aristocracy, upon whom we lavish so much care that none remains for others. Are we not inclined to intrench ourselves within the sanc tuary, and to see only the little throng of devout persons who weekly or monthly kneel around the altar rail, or those whose title to nobility is that they are pewholders and respond to the pastor's call with generous subscriptions? Pews and pew holders may be necessary evils; but it were fatal not to look far beyond them. Wha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

The Indian Advocate. 242 ear of the most vile, the most ignorant, and the most godless. To save those who insist on being saved is not the mission of the Church. "Compel them to come in" is the command of the Master. To sing lovely anthems in the Cathedral stalls, and to wear copes of broidered gold while no multitude throng nave or aisle, and while the world outside is dying of spiritual and moral starvation this is not the religion we need to-day. . Seek out men; speak to them, not in stilted phrase or ' seventeenth century sermon style, but in burning words that go to their hearts as well as to their minds, and in accents that are familiar to their ears. Popularize religion so far as prin ciples permit; make the people chant in holy exultation can ticles of praise and adoration: draw them to God by all "the cords of Adam." Save the masses, cease not to plan and work for their salvation. Men, made in the image of the Creator, are viewed as pieces of machinery or beasts of burden. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

243 The Indian Advocate. action, days of warfare. Into the arena, priest and layman! Seek out social evils, and lead in movements that tend to rec tify them. Speak of vested rights, for this is necessary; but speak, too, of vested wrongs, and strive, by word and exam ple, by the enactment and enforcement of good laws, to cor rect them. Glance mercifully into factories at etiolated youth and infancy. Pour fresh air into the crowded tenement quar ters of the poor. Follow upon the streets the crowds of va grant children. Visit prisons and secure for the inmates moral and religious instruction. Lessen on railways and in public service the Sunday work which renders the practice of religion impossible for the thousands. Cry out against the fearful evil of intemperance which is hourly damning the bod ies and souls of countless victims, which, more than any other social sin, is bringing disgrace upon the Church and misery upon her children. Into the arena, I repeat, to the work which lies b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

The Indian Advocate. 244 INDIANS. : MISSION Oditor of "Land of Sunshine" Makes protest Against I heir Cruel ireat- ment by the Government. X X 8 According to Charles F. Loomis the condition of the Mission Indians of Southern California grows worse from day to day. In a recent stirring paper he declares that something must he done for them soon if anything is intended to be done at all. After a lengthy description of the condition of those humble Catholics he sums up thus: "It is now an indisputable matter of fact that the Mis sion Indians of Southern California, particularly in San Diego county, have been swindled out of practically all the land on which it is possible for them to make a living even the barest living. Fraudulent surveys; progressive advance of the walking fences some of their chivalrous neighbors have invented; and frequently cases of forcible dispossession by a class of white squatters who are less men than any Indians I ever knew these have been the proud methods ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

jP riBrmii 245 The Indian Advocate., Cuba, Porto Rico, the Philippines down from the Indian Missions of our own land from Ireland, India, the isles of the sea. Meanwhile we are scarcely able to help ourseh es at home. The case of the California Mission Indians is pitiful; yet how may it be remedied?" c2$ c2$ c2$ . ----- :: :: . 1 :: THF PFRFFfT PADTs OF I? I i ar it n w : I i A PERFECT WHOLE. H i : :: :: ! The logical beauty of the Catholic faith is often seen in the fact, that each dogma is not only perfect in itself, but per fect as an essential part of a perfect whole. .Analysis or syn thesis is an equally safe method of treatment when handling the sublime science of theology. Each part of the Catholic faith must be necessarily divine, because the whole of the Catholic faith is divine; or, each part being divine, the whole must be divine; it matters not, logically, how we argue it. It is in this certainty whether the analytic or the synthetic that Catholic theology is the exact o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

1'hk Indian Auvocatk. 246 approving this measure or that principle as probably right, and "voting against" other measures, other principles, which do not happen to commend themselves to their private views. A Catholic, on the contrary, knows that the rejection of any one dogma is the same thing with the rejection of all Author ity; because each dogma rests on the same Authority as the whole Faith, and therefore if one dogma be wrong, all the dogmas may be wrong, and the whole belief is but a blending of probabilities. The same Authority which approves the supremacy of the Holy See, approves the blessing of water, ashes and divers matter; the whole of the Christian faith, worship and sentiment proceeding from the Incarnation, and therefore every part of the grand whole being assured. The denial of this truism contains its own refutation, for the pun ishment of that denial is chaos. Experience has shown in the history of all heresy, and especially in the history of modern Protestantis...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

247 The Indian Advocate. frailty is inseparable from the fact of the Fall. Not all souls go to purgatory no one ever supposed that; yet that all souls who, by their own fault, have died imperfectly, have to attain to justice before they can get to Heaven, is a simple verity which each separate Catholic dogma, and synthetically, all Catholic dogmas put together, show to be justified by reason as by faith. We may trace this truism at a mere glance, it is so self evident. Thus, Baptism is the ingrafting of a spiritual nature upon a nature which shows the effects of original sin; and the very existence of original sin presupposes a life's contest "between the lower and the higher nature of a baptized soul. Yet this contest also presupposes loss or gain, so that purga tory is in the full view, as it were, of every baptized soul, who incurs a temporal debt for sins which God may have forgiven. The Sacrament of Penance is the homage paid to the spirit ual nature (and 'also to God Who creat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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