ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Stylus, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,852 items from Stylus, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
8,852 results
Page 2 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

PETER J. BRADY Reliable . . . Job Printer 626 Massachusetts Ave. (Near Washington St.) ■ BOSTON METAL K SKYLIGHTS. Guaranteed not to leak, drip or sweat; non-condensing, fire-proof, ventilating. Strong, light and durable. Send for illustrated catalogue. E.Van Noorden & Co., 383 HARRISON AVENUE, Boston, Muss. Class Emblems Buttons, Badges and Jewels .... Prize Medals . . IN GOLD AND SILVER Designs and Estimates Furnist-ed The W. J. FEELEY CO. 71 E. Washington St. 185 Eddy St. Chicago, Ills. Providence, R. I. fine Ball and Society printing a Specialty, J. FRANK FACEY, 18 Central Sq., Cambridge. J. G. FOLEY. COUNSELLOR AT LAW. 2389 Washington St. and 16 Pemberton Sq., Room g, Room 2, ' ■ BOSTON, --ale—J»

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
“HE IS RISEN.” [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

“HE IS RISEN.” 'Twas early morn. The wonted shade Above green field and wooded glade, Still made the shrub and tree-top seem Bedimmed, as visions in a dream. No living thing from covert strayed, And nought the stilly hour betrayed Save dulcet purlings from the stream, — 'Twas early morn. No more the after-gloom was stayed; Full into view in beauty played Above the hills a new day's gleam, And earth on one enchanting theme An impulse of pure love obeyed That early morn. Triumphantly arose the strain, From out the world, where death had lain, — To-day He's risen ! O behold ! Our Shepherd comes to greet His fold. Then lo! the woodland choirs were fain To sing anew their glad refrain, And echoes in this hallowed vein A thousand times its joyance told — Triumphantly. The while in splendor burst amain, Love's light across the verdant plain, And quiet vale, and forest old. On all the world, deep tinged with gold, A light of glory seemed to rain— Triumphantly. —-J. A. Crowley , '97.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EASTER THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

EASTER THOUGHTS. CHRISTMAS brings us the Infant Saviour and the deep joy which surrounds His coming into a long-expectant world. Easter, on the other hand, brings us the risen Lord, the consummation of the purpose for which Christ's life on earth was spent. It is the "feast of feasts ," the solemnity of solemnities." To it all the feasts in the Christian year lead, and from it every feast takes its value. What would be the worth of the intense yearnings of Advent, the innocent joy of Christmas, the stern teachings and penance of the fasting time, the hallowed days of the passion, if there were no glorious Easter to crown the year : O maids and striplings, hear love's storv : The King of Heaven, the King of Glory, This day hath risen from cerements gorv. Upon this holy feast, now raising Our hearts to heaven in songs of praising, Sing Him of glory, sun-like blazing. In hushed humility avowing, With knees and hearts and senses bowing, All His great mercies life-endowing. It is the fea...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CATHOLIC POETS OF NEW ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

CATHOLIC POETS OF NEW ENGLAND. MRS. MARY E. BLAKE. Airs. Blake has been for many years one of the most popular of our poets. Her poems are numerous, and, though she has not attempted any lengthy work, the grace, fancy and sprightliness of her pieces have rendered them familiar to lovers of the lighter and more dainty varieties of verse, and endeared her name as that of a household friend, whose legitimate province it is to enliven the dull ways of life with her delicate wit and benevolent cheerfulness. She has contiibuted, and continues to contribute much to the magazines, and is, probably, one of the best known Catholic writers of Boston. Mrs. Blake's publications include, besides her poems, several popular volumes of prose of high merit. Her writings are generally marked by an ease and liveliness of style, and by a never-failing command of poetical language. These qualities, which have an inexpressible charm for so many readers, are invariably found in her works as appropriate ves...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
“SOLVITUR ACRIS HIEMS.” [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

“SOLVITUR ACRIS HIEMS.” (RONDEAU.) Sweet spring is here. On hill, in dell, In sheltered nook, the flowers dwell, The while the swaying boughs between Myriad fair choristers are seen, And naught their tuneful notes can quell. The warming showers at last compel The field-lily to ope its cell, And sunshine plays upon its sheen— Swe'et spring is here. Who in this blithesome time can tell Whence comes this gladness to dispel Our winter's dream ? In cool ravine And mossy glen, the rose, I ween Will blossom soon ; and all looks well, — Sweet spring is here. —M. J. Splaine, '97

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
HAS THERE MORE THAN ONE ADAM? [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

HAS THERE MORE THAN ONE ADAM? COMPETITION ESSAY. FOR centuries the general teaching of mankind regarding the origin of the human race was that all the various tribes and nations of the earth were descended from Adam and Eve. Such, indeed, is the doctrine of Holy Writ, and although there is not the slightest ground for doubting its truth, yet we find men to-day who, on account of the differences which exist in the size, color and form of the respective races, claim that each individual race is absolutely and specifically distinct from the others, and that each has descended from its own centre of creation. Some go so far as to claim that this plurality of origin is not inconsistent with the teaching of Revelation, which, they argue, pertains only to the Caucasian race. These would-be philosophers tell us also that the creation of other races ought to be assigned to a time many centuries previous to the date fixed by the Mosaic chronology. In this paper we shall not discuss the antiqu...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PRIZES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

PRIZES. COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. THE shadows of June are not far distant, and we think it proper to call the attention of the students to the following prize competitions : (i ) The first prize in Christian Doctrine, one hundred dollars in gold; (2) The second prize in Christian Doctrine, fifty dollars in gold; (3) Father Orr's three prizes—(of thirty, twenty and ten dollars respectively) —for the best English composition on a subject assigned by the donor; (4) prize for declamation, twenty-five dollars in gold; (5) the Fulton prize of twenty-five dollars in gold, for reading, founded by the Y. M. C. A. ; (6) The STYLUS prize of twentyfive dollars for the best essay contributed to the College paper. All these are for the College department. Besides those mentioned, we must not omit the Alumni prize, the winning of which has been regarded as one of the highest honors of the College. It consists of a purse of Fifty Dollars in Gold, and is awarded to the one who writes the best essay on an ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
HIS COMING. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

HIS COMING. lie comes to greet the death oppressed, A nursling wafted from above, With gracious gifts of light and love — What welcome waits this royal guest ? Grim skies spread o'er the dying year, Like draperies of ghostly shrouds; No sunset bloom to fringe the clouds, When blending shades of night appear. A storm-swept world, wild winds that moan O'er the desolate earth enwrapped in gloom, Sad with the sorrows of the tomb, And the ocean's dismal tone. Down sinks the world to her sepulchre, Like one unmourned, forsaken, old, With no sad paean softly tolled, Nor loveful heart bewailing her. HIS PASSING. How passes the guest on His royal way? Showering His gifts of life and light; The fair year waxing wondrous bright 'Mid the lustre of the sun-loved day. And a radiant world, whose hills and streams Are rose-flushed in the purpling glow, Of the splendrous dawn ; a gem-like show Of dews that flash in the new day's beams. A glorious sparkle of the sea;— A rainbow tint athwart the stran...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A VALUABLE GIFT. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

A VALUABLE GIFT. That valuable gifts are within the reach of the earnest student is evident from the announcement made by Rev. Fr. Rector that a scholarship in the College classes has been established by benefactors of learning. The conditions under which this gift is to be won may be learned by sending a stamped envelope to the reverend President of Boston College, with the full address of the applicant written thereon. As a scholarship is a practical recognition of studious application, and of intellectual superiority, we are confident that the boys of Second Grammar will strain every nerve to grain this desirable urize.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

EXCHANGES. THE Beacon , the official organ of the Massachusetts School Press Association, is an exchange recently added to our list. Its fifteen large pages are well stocked with prose and poetry of a high order of merit. The Golden-Rod from the Quincy High School, is a dainty little journal. The literary departments of the paper receive much more attention than usually falls to the lot of a high school publication. The same may be said, with equal truth, of the Oak, Lily and Ivy , which is published by the senior class of the Milford High School. The Britnonian is published weekly by the students of Brown University. What principally attracts our attention every week is the department under the heading "Brown \ erse," a collection of poetic effusions written in a light, humorous vein. The verse is always enjoyable on account of the sentiments expressed, while the rhymes often show such originality as to recall the famous Ingoldsby Legends. We have spent many an agreeable hour conni...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
COMMUNICATION. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

COMMUNICATION. MOON ISLAND, April i, 1595. Dear Editor: I call your attention to the date of this letter. You may, perhaps, recognize it as the day on which the abounding " Prep " endeavors to bring all mankind —yea, and womankind, too —into the category which he himself occupies'so successfully. Today, in the gym., as a matter of course, the usual ancient ingenuities were resorted to in order to bring about well-known results. How perennial and immutable is a joke! I have been asked to-day to do various things, and been informed, as a reward for my fresh, confiding courtesy, that I belonged to the April species of those whose number Solomon said was infinite. I wonder who started this ceremony. The traditional precision with which it is conducted each succeeding year, and the fidelity to oldestablished methods make one fancy that there is a special rubric for it somewhere. The first contriver of this spring outlet for humor must have had himself —I was going to say a humorous vein....

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Boston College [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

Boston College PUBLISHED MONTHL T. TERMS CF SUBSCRIPTION: One dollar in advance, post-paid. Single copies, fifteen cents. ADVERTISING RATES : Address JAMES H DEVLIN, Advertising Agent, Boston college. Tiie STYLUS is published by the students of Boston College as an aid to their literary improvement, and to serve as a means of communication between the Alumni and the Under-graduates. It looks chiefly to present and former students, to graduates and their friends for its support. These are earnestly asked to give it their patronage. Address, BOSTON COLLEGE STYLUS, 761 Harrison Ave., Boston, Mass. THE STAFF: JOIIN J. KIRBY,'9S ------ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. THOMAS J. GOLDING, '95 J CHARLKS J. MARTELL, '96 - - - I , „ T ASSOCIATE EDITORS. JAMES P. WARREN, 96 - PATRICK S. CUNNIFF, '97 J JOHN M. FARRELL, '95 EXCHANGE EDITOR. JAMES 11. DEVLIN, '97 BUSINESS MANAGER. FRANCIS J. CARNEY, '9B ) „ . „ - ASSISTANT BUS. MAN. FRANCIS J. CONLIN, J Press of the ANGEL GUARDIAN, 92 Ruggles St. APRIL, 1895.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EDITORIAL. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

EDITORIAL. W E cannot urge the students too earnestly to put into practice the thoughtful suggestions recently made by our reverend president with regard to a systematic course of English reading. We cannot live without food; we cannot breathe without air. Reading is to the mind what food and air are to the body. The want of a proper training in this particular invariably shows itself in our outward behavior. The polished, interested speaker, the courteous gentleman, the able lawyer, the eloquent priest—are all men of extensive reading. And this is but natural. For, as a wise instructor has well remarked, " in order to have a judgment sound and correct, you must travel through the history of other times and be able to compare the present with the past. To have the mind vigorous you must refresh it and strengthen it by constant intercourse with the miehtv dead, who have gmne away, but left their imperishable thoughts behind them." This can only be done by a judicious course of readin...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DOMI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

DOMI. The gentle, budding Spring Is the poet's latest theme, And praises loud they sing Of the gentle, budding Spring: — Yet their trials nothing bring, All in vain these labors seem, Tho' the gentle, budding Spring Is the poet's latest theme. All eyes are now turned towards Easter morn when the wealth of fashion will display itself in its costliest raiment. Meantime, economy will be a household word among those who try to keep up with this mighty throng of the gay and fastidious. Even a famous mustache has been sacrificed to the demands of fashion. The changes about the College during the past few weeks have wonderfully improved our scientific department. The lecture hall has been made more lightsome and comfortable by putting large double wtndows in place of the smaL ones, while the partition that separated the chemistry recitation room from the laboratory has been removed, thus forming one large, airy class room. During repairs, physics and chemistry were taught in the philosophy...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ALUMNI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

ALUMNI. AFTER the lapse of almost thirteen years the charmed circle of the class of ISB2 has been visited by death. On the afternoon of March 23, Rev. Daniel H. Reardon, who had been ill but a short time, passed away peacefully at the parochial residence of the Church of the Sacred Heart, in Maiden. Father Reardon was born in Essex about thirty-five years ago, and received his early education in the public schools of Salem. His classical studies were made in Boston College, and, after his graduation, he entered the Grand Seminary at Montreal. He completed his theological studies, however, in St. John's Seminary, Brighton. He was first assigned to East Weymouth, and three years later went to Wakefield. He was transferred to Maiden about a year ago. Father Reardon was a tall and well-built man, and of an exceedingly genial disposition. He was an able worker, and toiled assiduously for the spiritual and temporal welfare of those under' his care. He leaves a mother, a sister, and a brot...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CLASS NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

CLASS NOTES. '95- The reverend professor of philosophy lias resumed his lectures, after a month's absence on account of sickness. The seniors feel very happy over the increased facilities and conveniences brought about by the alterations in the science halls and laboratory. William Murphy has the sincere sympathies of his classmates for the loss of his sister, who died March 25th. The class takes this occasion to thank the reverend president for his kind and very acceptable innovation in serving lunch after the annual retreat. The numberless improvements introduced in the short space of six months have indicated, an intention, on the part of the president, to spare 110 cost or trouble in his endeavor to insure the future prosperity of Boston College. John Duke has left the class to enter business. Rev. Nicholas Walsh of the Cathedral has been chosen baccalaureate preacher for '95. '96. For three days after the retreat the Rhetoricians had the honor of entertaining, as their guest, R...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A DASTARDLY DEED. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

A DASTARDLY DEED. THE fates had decreed a change in the governing staff of St. Botolph's College, the most fashionable institution of learning in Boston. The new rector was a man of unusually brilliant parts, and a lover of everything pertaining to education and refinement. With his arrival a new spirit had been infused into the scholars, who now felt that they had to go through something more than a desultory recitation of drearily prepared lessons. His first orders fell upon the boys like an earthquake, for they were to the effect that no student in the future who fell below the high mark of 60 for two successive months should participate in athletics or represent the institution on the college stage. This was final, and in selecting players for the mid-year play his orders were carried out to the letter. Even those who had taken part in previous plays, and who had come to regard themselves as almost necessary to any public exhibition, were not exempt, and in cases where parts had...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DRAMATIC NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

DRAMATIC NOTES. THE play to be given by the chosen few among the younger students is rapidly advancing towards perfection. The plastic material presented by these young gentlemen lends itself readily to the moulder's hands. Our two Dromios (for as such Nick Lawless and Franklin Doland are known in dramatic circles) are evidently not satisfied with the laurels already won, but seem bent on eclipsing their former triumph. So, too, does the long-to-he-remembered Angel of " King Robert " grow tired of his well-earned wreath, nor need he doubt that he will replace it by a new and fairer one. Arthur Fogarty, who so agreeably surprised all by his cleverness on the stage, bids well to sustain his reputation. It is needless to say that Jones Corrigan will be all that one could desire, for Jones does all things well. All the above are not strangers to our audiences, and they intend to show the fruits of their two years' experience on the College stage. The rest of the cast is new, but each an...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE DEBATE WITH GEORGETOWN. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

THE DEBATE WITH GEORGETOWN. THE Philodemic Society of Georgetown College has acceded to the Fulton Debating Society's request for a change of date from April 25th to May Ist, for the intercollegiate debate. It only remains to secure the judges and issue the invitations. The arrangements will then be complete. Were the correspondence between the two societies made public it would prove interesting and instructive reading. There was never the slightest misunderstanding. The amicable spirit and courteous tone that pervaded every letter from Georgetown were a constant assurance that no obstacle to the holding of the debate would come from that quarter. On its part, the Fulton Debating Society, ever since it first extended the invitation to debate, has felt and acted as a highly honored h"st, who delights in the thought of soon receiving and entertaining a most welcome guest. Boston College sent the invitation, which Georgetown promptly accepted. Then it was agreed that the debate should...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ATHLETICS [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 April 1895

ATHLETICS THE base ball situation in the College has improved greatly during the past few weeks, and the present outlook is most encouraging. Under the watchful eye of Manager Harty the thirty candidates have been doing faithful gymnasium work for several weeks past, and, with the advent of April, outdoor practice has begun in earnest. Harmony reigns throughout the classes, and active co-operation is promised all along the line. All of the candidates for the nine have had more or less experience on their class teams or elsewhere, and the new men come to the College with good records. It is impossible at this early date to do more than conjecture as to the final make-up of the team, yet with the material at hand it seems safe to predict that a strong nine will be developed. In the box the possibilities are: Hart, '96, substitute pitcher on last year's team ; Lawless, '96, who has made a reputation on his class team, and Collins, a former Holy Cross man. McDermod, '97, who played on t...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
x
Loading...
x
x