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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 2 - MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTIONS NUMBER 2 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES He stood in Parkyway Exxon, looking across Highway 58 and told what Meadows of Dan looked like sixty years ago. For over seventy years he has lived in this community. Listening to him talk is like traveling in a time machine backward to a simpler era. An era when "chestnut orchards" instead of restaurants and service stations covered the tiny mountain community of Meadows of Dan. As he described Meadows of Dan circa 1920, you almost could see how this area looked then. Highway 58 was not here then, neither was the Blue Ridge Parkway. "The road" was the old "Danville and Wytheville Turnpike" and it's still here, much like it's always been, a simple, little winding mountain road. Only one of the buildings on "58" today was here then. It's the CRAFT HOUSE now but then it was only a one stpry mountain home. The old store with the "Oddfellows Hall" upstairs isn't here anymore and neither is the "old" Meadows of Dan Baptis...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PRETENSES BY: Wm. Axley Allen ©1983 My first experience with bootleg whiskey came years ago, on one of my first excursions to this area. I was traveling with a friend from North Carolina and we were concluding a business deal with an area "old timer" from down near Fairystone Park. After everything was taken care of, we were standing around talking and the fellow I was with (who tended to brag) threw back his shoulders and said, "Burk", (not the old timers real name) "there isn't anything better than a good drink of moonshine". Old Burk looked George in the eye and said, "come on in the house". I noticed George's smile starting to fade but he held up well. Once in the house, Burk walked over to a closet, reached in among the clothes and withdrew a half gallon jar. Burk didn't talk much, just smiled, while George nervously rattled on about how he loved moonshine. All the while Burk was slowly twisting the lid off the jar. He handed it over to George, who pretended to inspect it with ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 A section of the Mountain Laurel will be dedicated each month to those people who do not believe there are any Americans left who still take pride in their workmanship. We will feature people in Patrick, Carroll and Floyd Counties each month who not only take pride in what they do but have brought their particular talent to a state of the art. These people are gifted and their products are the result of their dedication and effort to do something with pride. Glendon Boyd, as a small boy, tramped through the woods with his father, Turner Boyd hunting, "Just the right young white oak trees to make splits for chair bottoms. We would always look on the north bank of the creek because that's where the straightest one's grew, with their branches reaching straight up for the sun. I went to help him carry the wood back but I spent most of the time running ahead, hunting small pieces of wood to carve whistles out of." - Until five years ago, that...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

(FIRST APPEARED APRIL 1983) GONE FISHING By: Wm. Axley Allen ©1983 Trout season opens at twelve noon on April 2nd this year and to give you some idea of how important this event is in these parts, I'll tell you a story Woodrow W. "Woody" Dalton told me of opening day in 1941. The season opened on April 20th in 1941, a Sunday, and Woody had planned for over a month to spend the day fishing his favorite holes along the Dan River. Sometimes fate can wreck havoc with the best made plans and that was the case with Woody's for opening day. Woody and his wife, Avis, were sharing a big old two story home near Mayberry with their friends, Coss and Violet Stanley and Woody and Coss had made their fishing plans together for opening day. They planned to get up at about 4:00 a.m., eat breakfast, do their chores and head to the river. Woody and Avis were expecting a baby about then and Violet had been teasing Woody for over a month that he better not plan to go fishing on opening day because Avis...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 Bootlegging, like the chestnut tree, is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. Only a few old die-hards persist today. Yet, there was a time when bootleg whiskey was one of the few ways a mountain family had of getting cash. Not everyone participated but those who did were an independent bunch. They worked hard to provide for their families the best they could during times that many of us today would have found impossible. They were not the lawless "hillbillys" that so many stories have been told about. They were, for the most part, honest, God-fearing family men who did what they had to do. They didn't choose bootlegging because it was easy, on the contrary, it was extremely hard work but it offered an honest man a chance to "take care of his own". Their independent nature was often coupled with a sly sense of humor, making them colorful characters indeed. They were men of a bygone era. There was quality in the product they produced and ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

SPRING TONIC BY: Ashby Hartwell Williams ©1983 Many old timers around here tell of springtime in their youth and Mama's spring tonic. The recipe varied greatly from one family to another but one thing remained constant, there was no getting around taking a dose of it. The most common ingredient was spicewood twigs. To this might be added Boneset leaves, dried in the fall or fresh violet leaves. (Violet leaves are now known to contain a high vitamin C content.) The tonics were usually bitter, foul tasting concoctions that would, "Make yer blood rise like the sap in a tree". The more compassionate mothers would lace it with honey, though the general feeling was that if it tasted good, it wasn't doing you any good. Many of these remedies have been found to have a good medical reason. Ground Ivy was brewed into a tea for collickey babes. We know today that it contains a mild tranquilizer. It's a wonder people survived other remedies such as brown sugar and kerosene for whooping cough. A...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES COLLECTION NUMBER 2 Mrs. Ella Hughes Boyd was born in 1897 in a sod house in Naper, Nebraska. Her parents had moved there in 1880 from lowa in a covered wagon. She remembers that sod house of her childhood and can tell you today how to construct one. "The plains in Nebraska were covered with buffalo grass. It has a thick root system and they would plow long strips side by side, the width for building blocks and then just cut between those strips for squares and lift them out. These were stacked to make the house, roof and all. Lots of times the grass would still grow on the outside of the house and it would be green. Inside the house, we would white wash the walls. It was a warm house." On those praries, the worst thing to fear was fires. With the big open praries, there was nothing to stop them. "My earliest memory is of seeing a fire in the distance. My father started plowing around our house to make a fire break. .We were lucky, the wind carried it anothe...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

JOHN WHEELER HELMS This is a tribute to a father. John Wheeler Helms was born in 1898. At the age of 19, he married 20 year old Dolly Susan Radford. They started a family. By the time he was 34 and she was 35, they had 13 children. She died giving birth to the last two, who were twins. Upon her death, many friends, neighbors and kinfolks offered to take the children to raise but it would split them up into different homes. John Wheeler wouldn't here of it. He said, "No! They're my kids and they won't be split up." So, at 34 years old and with 13 children (three less than 16 months old), he became both mother and father to his family. His oldest child was 16 years old. Lillie Agnew of Patrick Springs, Virginia, was his middle child. There were six older and six younger than her. She was nine when her mother died. She recalls that if her father ever dated another woman after her mother died, she never knew of it. "He liked his toddy but he kept his family fed." When they killed a hog,...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 Well, I'm not going to give any names in this story (at least not names anyone would recognize). There's still some pretty tender egos regarding the event I'm about to relate and public disclosure could possible result in actions on the part of others that, quite frankly, I do not wish to assume responsibility for. Dastardly crimes committed by beserk and deadly criminals have a statute of limitations, after which the perpetrator can not be punished, but the practical joke never goes beyond retribution. The perpetrator of a practical joke might go years in unsuspecting bliss, thinking he has pulled it off and completely escaped the inevitable "Payback". This story is about one such jokester and his imagined escape from the proverbial "payback". Yes, friends, he not only thought he had pulled off his joke without his victim getting him back one better but he bragged. He bragged to others about his cruel deed while slapping his thigh and ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

THE PAYBACK Continued from page 10. men around the store that morning but you could have heard a pin drop as Bill unfolded the letter. He was so excited he handed it over to Jim and told him to read it to him. Jim read as follows: FROM: Anthony W. Catter, Attorney at Law 221 Peachtree Street Atlanta, GA 30303 TO: Bill Allen, Jr. Crossroads, VA 24000 Dear Sir: My firm, for many years has represented the interest of Mr. Samuel B. Stockard, who formerly resided in your community. I regret to inform you that Mr. Stockard departed this life last week. He requested that upon his death, the enclosed letter and accompanying package be delivered to you. I regret your loss and wish you well. Sincerely, A.W. Catter, Attorney at Law Jim flipped to the next and last page while everyone in the store held their breath. He began: POSSUM WAR CRONICLES By: Wm. Axley Allen ©1983 Editor's Note...The following is a Actional account, based on a true story told to us by Harlow Cockram, of Mayberry. Back w...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 Between Furnace Creek and state road 605, in the Black Ridge section of Floyd County, Virginia, there stands a monument to the resourcefulness and ingenuity of the American pioneer spirit. The exact date of its construction is not known but it is at least 128 years old. It is certainly one of the oldest structures built by man that still stands in this area today. The structure I am referring to is the old iron furnace, which served as the smelter for the ore taken from the nearby mine. It is approximately 25 feet square at its base and stands about 20 feet tall. It is made of granite blocks, some of which weigh considerably over a ton each. One can only guess and imagine the methods and back-breaking labor that were required to erect this hugh smelter. The task was accomplished at a time when roads were little more than paths and no modern machinery was available to ease or replace sheer human determination. When I first saw it, I was ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

© Laurel Publications, Inc. 1983 PART II JUNE, 1983 Last month I told you of the old neglected furnace stack in Floyd County, located just off the Blue Ridge Parkway, north of Mabry Mill. The iron and copper mine nearby has been in operation off and on since 1790. In 1790, Captain Daniel Shelor, a veteran of the Revolutionary War first came to Floyd County and mined the iron and copper ore and smeltered it down into cooking utensils, to be sold through out this region. Around 1850, the furnace stack was bought by Robert L Toncray, who in 1861 lost the mine and all his wealth when his business failed. Around 1905, a company from New York bought the old Shelor mine and started the operation up again. But, in the modern time of 1905, the old methods just wouldn't do. In order to get the ore out of the mine easier, they bought a boiler in New York City and had it shipped to Christiansburg by train. Then the problem arose of how to get a seven foot high, twelve foot long boiler from Chri...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 £> Laurel Publications, Inc. 1983 (The following is Mrs. Clara Marshall's story of her tragic first marriage, told in her own words, from a taped interview with her.) "I'll be 90, on July 25. I was born in 1893. Did you ever hear about my first marriage? I married my first cousin. (Her mother's brother and his family lived in West Virginia and worked in the coal mines for a living. Young Ray was visiting his relatives here at Mayberry at the time.) We had to send through the mail to get the license from this store, (Mayberry Trading Post today). This was the place where we got our mail. We's having to keep it a secret because of my parents. They didn't want to let me go, so I had to sign Mammy's name to the papers myself. I know'd she wasn't going to give me up to go and get married. Well, we sent the papers off and he came to the store and got it. He said, 'Look here what I got! It's our license.' 'Oh!, I said, 'Well now you...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

"Well, I'll tell you what I miss most about old times," the elderly lady responded to my question. "I miss company that stayed too long. You know the kind I mean, the ones that'd stay right through dinner. Law, you couldn't get nothing done. They'd expect you to sit right there and listen as if you never had work to do. Maggie Tatum was always the worst to come and stay too long. She'd sit for hours just a rattling along, never once looking at her watch or the clock I always sit out when I knew she was coming." "Lord, what I'd give sometimes to have Maggie come over and talk. Course she's passed on and it ain't possible, but I'd sure love it." "It seems like as you get older, people get faster. Always in a hurry to do this or do that. Never got time to just sit and talk anymore. Even your kids, when they come to visit are always in a hurry. 'Gotta run, Ma' or 'We got'd be there in twenty minutes, Ma'. Always followed by, "I'd love to Ma, but I just gotta go". "Sure is hot for this t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 "Have y'all heard what happened over at J.B. Tilly's this morning?", the just arrived loafer asked his dozen or so counterparts who were sitting or leaning around the front porch of Max Taylor's store. The first reply he got was from Cal Thomas, who spoke up, "J.B. ain't started drinking again, has he?" Another fellow said, "No way. Old J.B. quit because of the way his old lady, Myra, raised cane about it and he won't even slip a drink on the sly when she ain't around." "That's a fact", echoed another, "When J.B. Tilly quit drinking, he quit for good!" With everybody's curiosity peaked, all eyes turned to the new arrival and several loafers spoke in unison, "Go ahead and tell us what happened, Ben." Well, Ben stood there for a moment, "situating his chaw", then spit a deadly accurate stream of ambeer at an unsuspecting fly that had lit in the store yard, then he began. "Sheriff Jessup got a call this morning to come out to J.B.'s and ma...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

REMINISCING WITH MR. WILL AND MR. COY W^r<m*2kJMßEP mm %% -\ "&--SBII J r y V- -,- ■f|w MR. COY OLIVER YEATTS Let me tell you about my trip down to Kibler Valley with Mr. Coy Yeatts. We were going to visit Mr. Will Barnard, a boyhood buddy of Mr. Coy's and a long time friend of mine. Mr. Coy is 84 years old and Mr. Will is 88. I picked up Mr. Coy at Mayberry shortly after 10:00 on a pretty Saturday morning. We went down Squirrel Spur (St. Rd. 614) to the foot of the mountain and cut back to our left on State Road 631. Mr. Coy pointed out paths that were once roads leading to the high hollows and ridge tops around the Bell Spur community. He remembered traveling over most of them but now they are hardly recognizable paths. He told of making a wagon trip down one with his dad when he was just a boy. All along the way he pointed out old homesites and points of interest. By the time we pulled up to the stop sign and turned left on Kibler Valley road, (State Road 6...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PA(iF. IX MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES OF Oft times, something will strike a chord and bring back a memory long forgotten from the corners of our minds. The photograph on the front cover of our June issue of the Keith homeplace near Willis, Virginia, taken in 1905, sparked such a memory in a woman I was privileged to meet. Mrs. Stella Strock said, "I drive by that place now and don't seem to notice it but that picture was exactly the way I remember it as a child. "Mrs. Strock's mother, Alice Hylton Hodges, and Mrs. Keith were girlhood friends. Mrs. Strock's mother married and moved to the Claudeville area of Patrick County, but every year, the family would pack up in a covered wagon and make the journey up the Rye Cove road to the top of the mountain. Then, they would cross onto the dirt road where the Blue Ridge Zoo is located now, go by the old Langhorne Mill and then on to Willis by way of the Keith's house. There was a beautiful farm they passed owned...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

SOLOMANS SEAL There are two varieties of wildflowers with the name Soloman's Seal, one True Soloman's Seal and one False Soloman's Seal. Both of these plants grow in abundance in the Blue Ridge, often side by side in forests and along roadsides. Both plants are alike in that they have one central stem approximately two to three feet long, arching gracefully. They also have leaves alternately arranged on the stem. The leaves look very similar also. The two plants are very easy to tell apart because of the location of their blooms. The False Soloman's Seal has a cluster of feathery, little white blooms at the end of the stem. The True Soloman's Seal has little cup shaped white blooms (usually in pairs) hanging under the stem, growing from the point where the leaves attach to the stem. These blooms are practically hidden by the leaves. In the fall, there is a cluster of purple specked, reddish berries on the False Soloman's Seal, weighting it down until the plant droops to the ground. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN MEMORIES, COLLECTION NUMBER 2 "Fast talking trading like fast drinking can pull a high toll." (Uncle Ben). There's three kinds of traders, the ones who do it for fun, the ones who do it for profit and the ones that are addicted, like my Uncle Charlie was. Uncle Charlie was a trader's dream come true 'cause once he decided to trade for something, there was no backing down. He became a man possessed and his better judgement got churned like butter into a blind optimistic faith that a little more boot would work the deal. The best example I know of his addiction was the time he decided to trade horses. This is a more or less true account of what happens to a trading addict consumed with "have to have it fever." Uncle Ben sat with his elbows propped on the kitchen table. His brother-in-law, my Uncle Charlie, was leaning over the back of an old straight chair that he was sitting backwards on. They were at Uncle Ben's house and Uncle Charlie was trying to trade Uncle Ben ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1986

MR. ADAM CLEMENT, BEEKEEPER Mr. Adam Clement of Ararat, Virginia was born July 3, 1901 and has lived all his life within walking distance of his present home. I first met Mr. Clement when Mr. Coy Yeatts and I went down to Kibler Valley, but you can read about that elsewhere in The Mountain Laurel this month. (See "Reminiscing" with Mr. Will Barnard and Mr. Coy Yeatts.) His craft is beekeeping. He was taught by his mother and has kept hives since the 30's. Ordinarily I'm not all that crazy over honey but Mr. Clement's honey is a different matter. It's delicious! After talking with him, my knowledge of the honey business has really increased. According to Mr. Clement, pure honey won't turn to sugar. This surprised me because I've bought a lot of supposedly pure honey that's turned to sugar. He said that occasionally, people boil sugar water with alum which creates a syrup. This way, a little bit of honey will go a long way but the result is no more than honey flavored sugar water that...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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