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Elephind.com contains 5,693 items from Virginia Farm Bureau News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1953

NO. 25 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO Save this page for future reference ***** — ROOT GROWTH — — WIDTH T~ 18" 12" 6" 0 I'" 18" This chart shows the distances that tobacco roots spread in varying time periods. These statistics were made available through experiments in which radioactive phosphorus was used. In the past several years, research workers have found isotopes increasingly useful in studies of tobacco's requirements and characteristics. An example of the value of isotopes in such work is shown by experiments conducted to study the use of phosphorus by the tobacco plant as affected by fertilizer placement. The fertilizer placements were (1) mixed in the row, (2) in bands 3 inches to the side of the transplanted tobacco plant and (3) side-dressed 10 days after transplanting. The fertilizer used was specially prepared by adding radioactive phosphorus to the ordinary phosphorus so that it would be possible to clearly distinguish between the use of the applied material and p...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1953

4 Will We Use The Brannan Plan WASHINGTON — There's lots of talk here that any new farm program will come up looking somewhat like the Brannan Plan. Even administration supporters admit it. In New York this week, worried butter distributors asked the Agriculture Department to put butter on the market, let it find its own price, then pay dairy farmers the difference between that price and 90% parity. That was former Agriculture Secretary Charles F. Brannan's porposal for all perishables. Congressman Jacob K. Javits (R-N. Y.) wrote Agriculture Secretary Ezra T. Benson this week, urging that U. S. families on public relief or drawing social security share in food surpluses now accumulating under the support price program. He proposed that USDA issue each such person $50 a month in food stamps, food for surplus commodities. But Javits went on to warn Benson that failure to find an answer to food surpluses that satisfies consumers will rebound to farmers' disadvantage. High food prices, ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1953

nTTOBER, 1953 Russia Negotiating To Buy Large Quantity $eat And Butter From Australia-New Zealand SYDNEY, Australia — (IFAP)— pussia is negotiating to buy large founts of Australian and New Zealand meat and butter, accordjng to the International Federation of Agricultural Producers. Three thousand tons of New Zeajand butter has been sold to the joviet and talks are being held (oncerning the sale of another jOOO tons. The price of the butter j S 30 to 40 pounds sterling a ton OID W l» * i m\JHIK JMMmibi jf Every day we hear somebody say that all bucket |"-.! Parlor, Pipe Line milkers are old-fashioned. That may be very true of ® Of Bucket? So far in 1953 we have sold more thousands of fe| the Surge Bucket Milkers than ever before.* f ! genuine Surge TUG & PULL that holds the teat cups down where So far in 1953 more thousands of dairy farmers than they belong. ever before have switched to Surge Bucket Milkers. No calf, no man and no machine can do a safe, satisfactory and ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1953

6 Delegation To Chicago (From Front Page) Blackstone, 9:16 a.m.; leave Farmville, 10:01 a.m.; leave Lynchburg, 11:03 a.m.; leave Roanoke, 12:20 p.m.; leave Christiansburg, 1:04 p.m.; leave Bluefield, 2:50 p.m.; leave Cincinnati, 11:55 p.m.; arrive Chicago, 7:15 a.m., December 13. Fares will be as follows: for those boarding at Norfolk and Suffolk, $42.26; Farmville, $41.92; Lynchburg, $37.89; Roanoke, Christiaasburg, and Bluefield, $35.65. These are special round trip party RESERVATION BLANK (Deadline November 20) Names Mailing address Phone I will board the train at Enclosed find check, cash or money order for my roundtrip fare: Norfolk and Suffolk $42.26 Petersburg, Blackstone, Farmville $41.92 Lynchburg $37.89 Roanoke, Christiansburg and Bluefield $35.65 J. understand that my ticket will be mailed to me before I board the train, if time allows, or it will be handed to me when I get on the train. Pick Butler FILL OUT AND SEND TO: Box 2B Richmond 3, Va. /W LONG-TERM MORTGAGE LOANS ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1953

OCTOBER, 1953 Attention Peanut Producers! Peanut producers have an op- association and thereby help portunity to vastly improve mar- yourself and fellow producers, keting conditions which in 1952 Time is short so don't delay signresulted in the Virginia area ' ing up. See theni promptly aml crop averaging only 83 percent thus assist those who are doing of parity. (The difference be- the signing up. tween 83 and 90 percent of e ,i v. . . Our price support program is parity tor the Virginia area crop 1 1 . • iftM i ,i.i under heavy, well financed atm 1952 alone amounted to a loss ; ~ e . .... ~. . tack. This association will not ot over tive million dollars to i , .„ A , n only strengthen our defense but producers, or about 20 dollars - ® • *7. • • vii will stabilize the peanut market per acre in V lrgima.) Also, mar- - r . . ... ii. each year at much nearer full keting conditions resulted in ; ~.. , , parity (a fair return) than the conditions whereby many pro- 1 J , . i P . . 83 per...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1953

8 Free Advertising for VFBF Members The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service to the readers of the News. Members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation may use this service at no cost. Simply state name, address, and Farm Bureau to which you belong. Limit number of words to 50 per ad, and number of ads per issue to two per person. Please type, or print clearly your advertisement. Deadline for advertising is the 15th of the month prior to next date of issue. For non-members rates are: 6 cents per word for one insertion; 5 cents per word for each insertion where three or more insertions are ordered. Minimum charge is 50 cents. Cash must accompany orders. Send ads to: Virginia Farm Bureau News, Box 28, Richmond 3, Va. FOR SALE: Several well-broken riding and working horses. George R. Hudgins, Negrofoot Farm, Highway 54, Beaverdam, Va. Phone Coatsville 2131. tf mf FOR SALE: Minnesota No. 1 swine. Why not start new with our good Minne...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

Editorial fatter May Be Reprinted Vol. 14 No. 11 Over 500 #/Xid VFBF State Convention Assembled for their fh*. cing are the newly elected officers of the Associated Women of the Virfe .ua Farm Bureau Federation. Left to right: Mrs. C E. Myers, Mrs. W. J. Ridout, Mrs. C B. Atwell, Mrs. L. B. Miller, Mrs. Roy B. Davis Jr., chairman, Mrs. C. D. Cassada, Mrs. Julian A. Larrick and Mrs. C. V. Wilson. uW Officers . 1 m mt i^WFm ,■ -^^MI||MPI?. -^ppi H| ■H|||% « H • jH ' |n&jHH Position Taken on 15National Issues During State Convention Voting delegates at the state convention of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation recommended action on 15 subjects to the AFBF convention delegates who will meet in Chicago next month to draw up resolutions on national issues. The full text of the recommendations on national issues as made by the Virginia delegates are printed below. The resolutions passed which constitute the VFBF position on state issues, will be printed next month. THK VOICE O...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture 99 Is published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Inc. at Kicnmond. Virginia. Subscription $1 00 per year, included in membership dues. Entered as second-class matter February 17, 1941, at the post office at Richmond. Virginia, add tional entry at Washington, D. C. under the Act of March 3, 1379. Edilorial and Business Offices, Otli and Marshall Streets, Box 28. Richmond 3, Va. Vice-Presidents First District —Geo. R. Mapp. Jr. Fifth District—C. B. At well First District —A. L. Grizzard Seventh District —W. H. Wright. Second District—Ralph Metz Eighth District—Goo. R. Hudgms Third District—T. T. Curtis At-Large—J. P. Gillam Fourth District— Geo. W. Palmer At-Large—'Thomas B. Hall Ninth District—C. B. Atwell Executive Secretary Director of Insurance Director of Organization M. A. Hubbard Alden E. Flory Cullen Johnson Treasurer Office Secretary Director of Information M. A. Hubbard Mrs. Evelyn Carter A. Pick Butler...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

NO. 26 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO Save this page for future reference TOBACCO requires too much labor and attention for the grower to risk producing an inferior crop by using inferior seed. It is hard enough to bring the crop successfully from seed bed through curing barn even under good conditions. When the seed is not well-cleaned, and is not of the best quality that the grower can obtain, the prospects for a superior crop are reduced. The difference between the cost of good seed and poor seed is so small that no grower can afford to use anything but the best obtainable. Start with Good Seed for Best Tobacco Crops A seed field where heads have been trimmed before any leavei have been harvested. Although a tobacco seed is one of the smallest of field crop seed, the plant that emerges is not only of comparatively large size but is one of the most important agricultural crops economically. In one ounce there are approximately 350,000 seed. Embedded in the small germs of these ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

4 Speakers Discuss Problems and Agricultural Outlook brightening for an upturn in the farmer's fortunes. H. G. Blalock, President of the VFBF, said, however, that farmers should not "be content with the minimum guaranteed price supports" but "should focus attention on expanding markets,increasing efficiency and production to raise our net income, seeking a maximum—not a minimum. Blalock declared in his annual message on the convention's opening day: "I do not feel completely satisfied ... to sit back with my supports and watch Russia steal our agricultural markets abro ad— watch synthetics steal our markets at home. Nor do I like to see every man with a little excess capital come to the farm to piddle in the business upon which I depend entirely for my income, knowing full well that with his guaranteed minimum he may well steal av.ay my market, despite his inefficiencies. "In trying to solve the problems of one commodity," he stated, 'we have unintentionally put into the program som...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

NOVEMBER, 1953 Caroline Farm Bureau Hears Sen Robertson Honorable A. Willis Robertson, U. S. Senator from Virginia, was the guest speaker at the Caroline County Farm Bureau banquet at the Town Hall in Bowling Green Nov. 5. Robert G. Eager, county agent acted as master of ceremonies. Francis D. Pitts spoke to the group on Farm Bureau accomplishments. Senator Thomas H. Blanton of Bowling Green introduced the speaker. Virginia now ranks 10th in the nation, an dfirst among southern states, in the percentage of farms having electricity. p Uhe assembly line that's 225,000 miles 10ng... ends at your front door! Remember how proud you were when you drove that bright, shiny, new car up to your front door for the first time? And the family came flocking, and maybe . a wistful neighbor or two? _ Well, the railroads had a part in that pride, too. For over their 225,000-mile assembly line of steel rails they moved the raw materials required foi* making the 15,000 parts that go into an auto. Then...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

6 State Convention Delegates Advise AFBF on 15 Issues and practically everything else the farmer must buy are in one way or another either fixed, supported or subsidized. Under these circumstances, it Is very difficult for the farmer to earn a decent livelihood if he alone attempts to sell on a free market. This we are unwilling to do. However, we feel that farmers, along with all others, labor, business and industry, should work toward the goal of more freedom, instead of less, in the most advantageous use of all resources. Higher incomes and better living standards for all, can in the final analysis, come only from increased production. FOREIGN TRADE Approximately 50 million acres of U. S. cropland are used in producing for export. Income from agricultural exports averages approximately $400 per year for each person engaged in agriculture. In the fiscal year 1952-53, our farm exports amounted to only $2,815,407,000 as compared to 54,053.000 for the previous year —a decline of 31 p...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

NOVEMBER, 1953 Price Supports, Foreign Trade, Resolutions Adopted The returns which a farmer may ,-ealize in his own lifetime on many soil conserving practices of a permanent nature are often too small to justify the full expenditure required. In such cases the larmer's personal gain from the adoption of such practices may be small as compared to the benefits that may be realized by future generations or by society as a whole. On the other hand, there is little justification for making incentive payments for carrying out practices that bring their own reward in the form of immediate cash profit to the farmer who uses them and have little or no permanent value in conserving the soil. We, therefore, request that a program of incentive payments be continued but that payments be limited to those practices and soil conservation projects that have pei manent value in conserving soil and water resources. In view of the continuing unbalanced condition of the federal budget, we recommend tha...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1953

8 Free Advertising for VFBF Members The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service to the readers of the News. Members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation may use this service at no cost. Simply state name, address, and Farm Bureau to which you belong. Limit number of words to 50 per ad, and number of ads per issue to two per person. Please type, or print clearly your advertisement. Deadline for advertising is the 15th of"the month prior to next date of issue. For non-members rates are: 6 cents per word for one insertion; 5 cents per word for each insertion where three or more insertions are ordered. Minimum charge is 50 cents. Cash must accompany orders. Send ads to: Virginia Farm Bureau News, Box 28, Richmond 3, Va. FOR SALE: One wheat thresher, se?f-feeder. also cover seeder and ba? attachments. One McCormick binder, eight-foot cut. Both machines in good condition. E. A. Rowe, Kinsale, Va. 11121mf FOR SALE: Several well-broken ri...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1953

The - •;■! o Virginia Farm Bureau "Am All Editorial Matter May Be Reprinted Vol. 14 No. 12 H. G. Blalock Files V.F.B.F. Soil Conservation Resolution H. G. Blalock, President of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, recently filed * statement with the subcommittee of the Committee on Governmental Operations in Washington, D. C., in regard to the reorganization of the Soil Conservation Service. In explaining the Farm Bureau stand on this vital subject, he said, "Farm Bureau leaders and our Soil Conservation District supervisors have studied the Department's plan to reorganize the Soil Conservation Service very carefully. We approve the plan and wish to commend the Department for its efforts to giv£ us more and better service for the money available for soil conservation." He also quoted a resolution adopted at the Va. FB annual convention in Richmond on November 6, 1953, which said in part: "Plans designed to transfer more authority and responsibility to state offices and to furnish mo...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1953

2 The Virginia Faxm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture" Is published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc. at Richmond. Virginia. Subscription $1.00 per year, included in membership dues. Entered ;is second-class matter February 17, 1941, at the post office at Richmond, Virginia, add tional entry at Washington, D. C. under the Act of March 3, 1879. Editorial and Business Offices, 9th and Marshall Streets, Box 28. Richmond 3, Va. Vice-Presidents First District— Geo. R. Mapp. Jr. Fifth District—C. B. Atwcll First District —A. L. Grizzard Seventh District—W. H. Wright Second District—Ralph Metz Eighth District— Geo. R. Hudgins Third District—T. T. Curtis At-Large-3. P. Gillam Fourth District— Geo. VV. Palmer At-Large—Thomas B. Hall Ninth District —C. B. Atwell Executive Secretary Director of Insurance Director of Organization M. A. Hubbard Alden E. Flory Cullen Johnson Treasurer Office Secretary Director of Information M. A. Hubbard Mrs. Evelyn Carter A. Pick Butler A...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1953

NO. 27 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO Save this page for future referenct TOBACCO production has a very high labor requirement per acre. Harvesting alone requires as much as, or more labor than, any other operation in the production of tobacco —yet harvesting is the one operation in which little progress has been made in labor reduction and work simplification. There are useful machines for most of the other phases of tobacco production, and these are being improved and supplemented. The Federal and State Agricultural Experiment Stations are encouraging the introduction of machinery into tobacco production. The work on mechanization is still continuing and promises to further reduce the hours necessary to raise and harvest high-quality Flue-cured tobacco. Flue-cured Growers Turn Toward Machinery LABOR REQUIREMENTS FOR TOBACCO PRODUCTION (MAN HOURS PER ACRE) 4|? I I. m n SI f I 1 ii 1111 MEPAtINO I AND TfANS CUifl SUC«* lAINWO CU«INO GtAOING IOTAIS ftANf MCtAtA 01 ANTING VATION CO...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1953

4 21 Subjects Discussed by State Resolutions very serious financial straits. The drought relief program of the Federal government is wholly inadequate to meet minimum needs. Unless more assistance is given, many farmers will be forced to liquidate livestock herds that should be kept as foundation stock if Virginia is to continue uninterrupted its healthy growth as a livestock producing state. Loss of this foundation stock would retard our progress for many years and would have far reaching consequences upon the state's entire economy. We respectfully request that the Governor and the Governor-elect recommend to the Legislature the appropriation of state funds to supplement assistance presently available and that such aid be made retroactive to match federal funds now available. CONTROL OF RABIES The valuable livestock industry in Virginia suffers losses amounting to many thousands of dollars each year due to rabies. Additional thousands are lost by the killing of valuable livestock ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1953

DECEMBER, 1953 facts. About Tax And Farmers Cooperatives (The cooperative tax issue is becoming more confused and thus controversial each year. The following article from the Tennessee Farm Bureau News should whet the readers appetite for n iore Information and study, and should clear up a few of the misunderstandings.) With the passage of the Cap-per-Volstead Act in 1922, farm cooperatives were defined as a special form of corporation and as early as 1926 received special consideration with reference to Internal Revenue. In fact, up until 1951, agricultural cooperatives, if they proved themselves to be bona fide cooperatives which meant that they were absolutely nonprofit institutions, were exempt from Federal Corporation Income Tax as such. With the passage of the Internal Revenue Act of 1951, such exemption was removed. Today cooperative corporations pay Federal Corporation Income Tax on exactly the same basis as preprietary corporations. The only way a cooperative can avoid paym...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1953

L Picture Highlights of VFBF State Convention Banquet Scene Some 350 Farm Bureau members from all over Virginia listen to Roger Fleming, secretary-treasurer AFBF, as he addresses the banquet meeting ««& If :< Sfi v fßr Wl BWP ■ Hr^Bl *w~ Hfek &SS&E: •ft-.. hHk!h'hP i ~ JBK' - MgHHi jg Research Stressed Dr. M. R. Clarkson, Deputy Administrator of the Agricultural Research Administration (USDA), speaks to the gathered delegates and members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation at the 29th annual convention. ' Burmeister Speaks Gustave Burmeister, Assistant Director of the Foreign Agricultural Service (USDA), addresses the assembled VFB members on the second day of the annual convention in Richmond. ■■MraPHHMmK. ml Officers Named For YM&W Clubs Tucker Leckie, a Louisa county youth, has been named president Of the Virginia Federation of Young Men and Women's Clubs for 1954. Other new officers are: Imogene Bell, Craig, first vic...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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