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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

July 1994 Disney proposal pits farmers on opposite sides of fence (Continued from Page 1) and more than 2 million square feet of commercial space." Coiner has lived in the area 34 years and he and his wife currently own 85 acres. He manages another 3,000-acre beef cattle farm. "This Disney thing is definitely going to affect agriculture," Coiner said. "The smartest thing to do would be to sell the land and move somewhere else, but thafs not a possibility." "Prince William County targeted this part of the county years ago for development," said Mary Anne Reynolds, a media relations manager for Disney's America. "That's why we ended up here. "We honor and respect farmers," Ms. Reynolds said. "And farmers in the area aren't going to find a better neighbor." The Walt Disney Co. has an option on 3,000 acres in western Prince William County and is currently in the process of having the property rezoned from residential to Planned Mixed Use Development. If the rezoning is approved, Disney ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

10 Sometimes You Find The Answer a In The Strangest j \ Places! Who would ever think of looking in a / \ * 1f • Farm Bureau office for the answer to ? their health insurance needs? / y $1,700 \f I- ( Savings )y Mrs. V.S. of Russell County, Va. did — and she found the answer: L * "I saved over $1,700 in annual premiums a —" So did more than 25,000 Virginians — and they found the answers to their health insurance problems. We know the average American is finding it tough to find adequate health insurance and to pay his medical bills. That's why the VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU has teamed up with BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD OF VIRGINIA to offer several health insurance programs designed to fit your needs. Contact the Virginia Farm Bureau — That's Where You'll Find The Anszver! ACT TODAY! Send for your FREE HEALTH INSURANCE INFORMATION PACKAGE. If you don't have medical coverage and are not already eligible for Blue Cross and Blue Shield group coverage, contact the Virginia Farm Bureau. Call our...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

July 1994 Aquaculture is growing Virginia industry (Continued from Page 8) operation in Lawrenceville, and Blue Ridge Aquaculture's tilapia operation. Some very large-scale operations are also preparing to go into business on the ocean side of the Eastern Shore, where Chesapeake Bay regulations aren't as restrictive, Nerrie said. Fish farmers seek niche markets Meanwhile, some prospective producers are looking beyond just food-fish production to niche markets like raising fish for recreational fishing and stocking sportfishing ponds, he said. One limiting factor on the industry's expansion is the lack of a local fin-fish hatchery, according to Robins Buck, aquaculture development manager for the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Currently, all breeds of fin-fish raised in Virginia are hatched out of state, leaving the cost of production to Virginia formers. "There are several individuals or groups in the process of getting a hatcheiy up and running," but the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

12 New barley variety means early harvest By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist WARSAW—A new barley variety, Callao, has been developed by Virginia Tech. Dr. Andy Swiger, dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, signed a release document for Callao at the Small Grains Field Day at the Eastern Virginia Research and Extension Center here May 19. Callao, which matures earlier in the year than the popular Nomini variety, has a higher test weight and is shorter-stemmed, Swiger said. Because of its short stem, this barley variety grows well with the growth regulator cerone. "Unfortunately, like anything new, the seed needs to be developed and it will be the fall 0f1996 before the seed is available to producers," said Dr. Dan Brann, Virginia Cooperative Extension Service grain specialist. Other crops were also discussed at the field day. "There were 200 acres of cotton planted in 1988; today there are 40,000 acres," said Dr. Harbans Bhardwaj,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

July 1994 Women use unique program to educate consumers on food The State Women's Cbmmittee has been busy planning state activities. One of the most important activities may be our Putting Food First program, which kicked off in June. The annual project helps educate the public on the importance of agriculture and points out the value of your food dollar. i, FARM BUREAU WOMEN Helen Neese State Women's Chairman Every year, fewer and fewer American farmers and ranchers feed and clothe an increasing number of people. Today, one American farmer provides the yearly food and fiber needs for 128.7 people. The efficient job performed by everyone involved in the food industry allows Americans to enjoy the most affordable, wholesome and diverse array of goods in the world. With the help of several county women's committees, seven grocery stores were selected to assist with the project. One hundred dollars worth of groceries were purchased for each store. The Farm Bureau women selected a shopp...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec ./Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

July 1994 Prizes give young farmers incentive Prizes for this year's American Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmer & Rancher Achievement Award and Discussion Meet winners should be incentive for those of you competing in Virginia's Young Farmer of the Year and Discussion Meet contests. The top winners of each AFBF contest will receive 1995 Dodge pickup trucks. The Achievement Award grand prize—a 1995 Dodge 3500 4x4 pickup—will again go to a single winner. The winner also gets a one-year subscription to Farm Bureau ACRES, a market information and analysis program, and a paid registration to the 1995 AFBF YF&R Leadership Conference in Atlanta, Ga. The ACRES subscriptions include the service and required equipment for one year. Four runners-up will each receive '<*•-«-' , s ?*'&%jfr< < ' •'• A lucky young farmer can win the use of a J I Case 5250 Maxxum tractor like the one pictured here. Virginia Farm VDACS mSL GRAiN ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

K m* nHHr — ft m --» • ,*v„ v v V* i ' 4BBB®* • ■- >Wf. «s" I MHEL3 l p- I n f ::y|ptfgi Hfc ■&' H W fj- | fi mHijlll. yi 11 1 Vol 53, No. 6 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS July 1994 REBECCA COLNAR/FBN Barley fields forever... For as far as they could see, participants at this year's Small Grains Field Day at the Eastern Virginia Research and Extension Center in Warsaw saw barley— fields and fields of it. Read what they learned about the grain, Page 12. ► A full range of life insurance programs ► Some of Virginia's most competitive »ITI auto & home insurance rates Complete farmowners protection I Mil f 1 y A \l A wide range of health insurance plans Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company Virginia Farm Bureau Fire and Casualty CO *" tl 3 # -s | 1 II Pi i I 1 SP 8. A 111 CM , . | 1 fl § ii (2 11 go i ii. | £ 5 §! 3 « 11 .& ! ill Iflllf 9 IllP §•«! 8 ! a Ihli INSIDE

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

Farm Bureau Vol 53, No. 7 New energy source found in hog waste Methane gas helps power swine operation By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor SOUTH BOSTON—It's not hogwash. Methane gas from swine manure can be converted into energy. Two Halifax County hog producers— Harry and Debbie Martin—are the first in Virginia to convert the waste from their 600-sow operation into energy. And they're making 85-90 percent of the energy used to run their three hog houses. "Any time you deal with livestock, you have to manage the animals and their manure," said Stacy Gettier, an agronomist with Carroll's Foods of Virginia. "You can look at the manure as waste or as a resource," Gettier added. "We chose to look at it as a resource." Gettier helped design the Martins' covered anaerobic lagoon, which breaks down the manure, captures the methane gas it produces, and routes it through a series of pipes to a generator. Livestock producers often use anaerobic lagoons, which decompose animal manure with n...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

2 Foreign workers fill void on farm August in rural Virginia means dog day afternoons, the promise of another exciting football season and the harvesting of various field crops—everything from apples to tobacco. As we head toward fall, foreign laborers return to the Old Dominion to begin gelding Virginia's bountiful, top-quality crops. These foreign workers, better known as H-2As, visit Virginia and other states each year because it is difficult for farmers to find domestic labor willing to work on the form. There are few remaining local labor markets as domestic workers find less hazardous, less demanding jobs for the same amount or even more money. They find it more comfortable working in air conditioned shopping malls or restaurants. Therefore, Virginia farmers must rely on labor from abroad. Most foreign laborers are dependable workers and do an excellent job. But, like many other cases, the federal government is contributing to the ruin of this well-intentioned program. Farmers...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

August 1994 August 3: Virginia Agribusiness Food Festival, Fairgrounds on Strawberry Hill, Richmond. Contact Virginia Agribusiness Council, 804-643-3555. August 3-4: Tennessee Valley Region Association of Demonstration Farm Families annual conference, Emory & Henry College. Contact Henry Snodgrass, 703-676-6155. August 4: Culpeper Farmers' Cooperative Expo '94, Culpeper Co-op corporate offices, Culpeper. Contact Doug Smoot, 703-825-2200. I P"IH 1 August 4: State Youth Field Day, Harrisonburg. Contact Dr. Charles Stallings, 703-231-4758. August 4: 2nd annual Summer Swine Producers seminar on meeting the challenge of environmental management on hog farms, Rowanty Vo-Tech Center, Carson. Contact Alan Harper, 804-657-6450. August 5: Virginia Soybean Board meeting, 1-4 p.m., New Church. Call 804-333-3710. August 5-7: Teen Weekend, Southwest Virginia 4-H Education Center, Abingdon. Call 703-676-6180. August 5-7: Virginia State Horse Show Quarter Horse division —youth and amate...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

4 Virginia Farm Bureau Announces Two New Health Care Insurance Products from Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield That May Provide You the Coverage You Need and SAVE YOU MONEY Individual Choice SM HMO For the individual who is concerned about quality and cost and wants comprehensive coverage for himself and his loved ones. - No annual medical deductible - Fixed, low co-payments for doctor visits - Unlimited lifetime maximum benefits Individual Choice, from Health Keepers, Inc. f provides extensive medical services - when you're well...and when you're not!* f Service in your area may be provided by Peninsula Healthcare, Inc. or Health Keepers, Inc. Virginia Advantage 5 ™ Program Covers hospitalization and surgery, physicians' services and office visits, emergency and preventive care and other medical services*. You also get: - Money-saving prescription drug card - Vision care discount program - Automatic claims filing in most cases Virginia Advantage has a choice of 6 deductibles - one is c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

August 1994 Former VFBF president on Tech's board By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—Former president of both the American Farm Bureau and Virginia Farm Bureau federations, Robert B. Delano, has been named to Virginia Tech's board of visitors by Gov. George F. Allen. His fouryear term began July 1 "My attendance at Virginia Tech made a big difference in my life, and hopefully I can make a contribution to the university and the state of Virginia serving on the board of visitors," Delano said. "My representation, even though I have a background in agriculture, will be to look out for the overall university." Delano was named Man of the Year in Virginia Agriculture in 1978 by Progressive Farmer magazine and was a top candidate for the post of U.S. Secretary of Agriculture in 1988 under the Bush administration. He graduated from Tech in 1944 with a bachelor's degree in animal husbandly. Following service in the U.S. Army during World War 11, Delano served as a county cooperativ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

6 w ! Llamas M fil fun, useful. oroH<a blc /gy -.: I Llama Association of the r I I Llamas as sentries ni jfc _ Alpacas ancl Llamas lyiid-Atiantic states produce w few I / 7T Don't miss tkese events O'v For more information f J sponsored by L*A*M*A # 5... \ \T about L*A # M*A*S or to request our x i r Anyone with an \ S <4 LAMAS Library, \ ♦ E\ JVm|Jw Llamas can perform • , , ■ 1] / \ t\ . rrt \ ' r interest in Hamas or / \ Dept FB, \ |J T /I alpacas is welcome. I 122 E. Main St, ffju H |\4 X _ )Qp f /?r f/re wcxf h'wc , r a 1 S Alpacas ■ \ / \ I Virginia State Fair Llama Show f27/i Annual\ Class "A" Show) There are a number of other llama September 25 & 26, IQQ4 events to be held n Virginia and its I Llamas can pull carts Virgina State Fair Grounds surrounding states in the next year. T£ . \ Rich mond, Virginia L-A-M-A-S members will be I | jr ]k X Contact: Dale Graham happy to let you know when they %m} jg» J /Hp (703) Q37-4475 are and where they ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

August 1994 Voting records indicate support for Farm Bureau-backed policies Farm Bureau depends on its legislators to make informed decisions when voting on various bills. The organization also counts on state legislators in the U.S. House and Senate to support Farm Bureau-backed legislation. The Farm Bureau uses these voting records to help measure the performance of Issue #1: Deficit Reduction Amendment March 18,1993: The House rejected an amendment by Rep. John Kasich, R-Ohio, that would have achieved $495 billion in deficit reduction over five years through various spending cuts but without any new taxes. The proposal failed on a 295-135 vote. Farm Bureau supported a "yea" (Y) vote. Issue #2: Adopting a '94 Budget Resolution March 18,1993: The House passed, 243-183, its fiscal 1994 budget resolution (H. Con. Res.64). The $1.5 trillion multi-year budget resolution contains $246 billion in new taxes to finance Clinton's domestic spending initiatives and deficit reduction targets. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

8 Property owners across U.S. score with Oregon win PARK RIDGE, 111.—All of America's property owners scored a major win when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that an Oregon city could not force a property owner to forfeit a portion of her land in exchange for a building permit, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation In the case "Dolan vs. Tigard," the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to uphold the constitutional protection of property rights. The ruling will benefit all property owners, including America's farmers and ranchers, according to AFBF President Dean Kleckner. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution forbids the government from taking private property without proper compensation. "This is a major victory for the constitutional sanctity of property rights," Kleckner said. "We haven't fully examined the decision, but as a farmer who depends on property rights, I'm very gratified to see the nation's highest court come down on our side. "We applaud the Supreme Court's adherence t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

August 1994 Lightning leading cause of rural fires Affordable protection is best prevention RICHMOND —Lightning damage is the No. 1 cause of fire in rural areas and a leading cause of fire in urban areas, according to the National Fire Protection Association. And lightning causes the most damage during the hot summer months. Lightning claims more than 200 "fy ■■■ UAV JL AiUUV ULUIi — X A tiVAA-U VCU XXJ U UUJ.V/ lltu 17V1 J uu uring the hot summer months. occupants should avoid touching meta ghtning claims more than 200 parts or fixtures. and causes billions of property • In the out ige each year in the U.S. The doors, keep awaj ;ning Protection Institute says from trees, meta ling is responsible for more than fences, poles and sim ncent of church fires, about ilar vertical objects, noent of lumberyard blazes, • In a grove of trees amage to 12,000 other struc- take shelter under the each year. smallest tree, and help avoid addition, reports by step voltage injuries bj Jational Ocean...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

10 Preserve floral gardens forever with dried flower arrangements This harvest season, don't forget to gather the components of a feast for the eyes. By preserving flowers, leaves and other handsome plant parts, you can adorn your home, make wonderful gift items, or even earn some extra income. The popularity of bouquets, wreaths, and other decorations crafted from dried plant materials has been holding steady. Gardeners who take time to dehydrate attractive herbage can create attractive accessories to use or sell. Surplus can be sold to hand crafters. Air drying is the simplest way of preserving flowers, grass plumes, and herbs. On a sunny day, collect flower blooms as they start to open. Gather six to 12 stems and strip the lower leaves. Form into an appealing bunch, varying the stem length so that flower heads do not touch each other. Tie the cluster together with elastic string, which will hold the stems as they shrink. Suspend the bunches upside down in a diy, airy place, out o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

August 1994 Contest offers farmers more than prizes As youngsters, we often argued our cases out on the playground. And in high school, we sometimes took to formally debating our points. As young farmers, we hold organized discussions about agricultural topics. And once a year, the best talkers compete in our Discussion Meet competition. The participants are given several questions to think about in advance. And during the Discussion Meet competition, which is held during the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention, one of those questions is selected as the discussion topic. This year's topics, as in previous years, are meant to get young farmers thinking about agricultural issues and trying to come up with some solutions. The following are four possible topics: □ What is agriculture's responsibility in the management and disposal of waste? MShould agriculture take care of urban waste? How much liability should producers have in regards to agricultural waste ? U Which gove...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1994

12 It isn't Mr. Ed... But this horse seems to be saying something. Perhaps he doesn't want to compete in a horse judging at the 1994 Animal Industry Day July 8 at Virginia Tech's Livestock Center. Beginning with the 1994-95 school year, Virginia Tech will offer a horseback riding program. '95 Farm Bill's impact is conference topic CHARLOTTOSVILLE—What should Virginians expect from the 1995 Farm Bill? Come find out Thursday, Sept. 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sheraton Inn. The Farm Bill is up for renewal in Congress next year. So this conference, presented by Virginia Tech's Rural Economic Analysis Program, will address some key policy questions related to the bill. National speakers will address each of the following topics: Will farm income security be there in 1995?; Will environmental and conservation concerns "drive" the *95 bill?; and Will rural development receive increased emphasis in the D 5 bill? In addition, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reorganization will be the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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