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Elephind.com contains 21,400 items from Rochester Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE WHOLE TRUTH. I [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

THE WHOLE TRUTH. I Vernon Ralston. William Arnott came out of the offi ces of Soilenberg, Steinthal and. Com pany in despair. He had had recom mendations from half-a-dozen people when he came from Canada to London. He had expected that the keen London business men -would have jumped at, the chance he put .before them. Tnree of the six firms had declined tu see him at all. The great Jacob Roth stein, the famous promoter, had-heard him for five minutes and then had re marked: "irhis is wild-cattery, wein youig friend. That sort of "bjsiness we do ! not touch." Arnott had told him wrathfully that he was so used to floating shady com panies that he did not know a sound business proposition when he saw (it. And now Soilenberg, Steinthal and .Company had frankly laughed at him. Sollenberg himself, had got up in the midst of his explanations to telephone to a friend to meet him to supper at the Ritz the next evening, and then had turned to Mr. Arnott. "Nothing doing. We've twenty mines ott...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LITTLE BRAIN WAVES. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

LITTLE BRAiN WAVES. To err is masculine; to iorgiv{\ ; aninine. Marriage is uewr a failure—:; the contracting parties frequently a ' All men are borne tree and but most of them spoil it by gg~j married. If it is anything he has paid tots the average man believes it is s< A woman never has much use foi man who she can't teach to be % ous. "Widow's weeds" rarely fc; fere with the growth of a futureq of orange blossoms. If a man can't persuade some man to lead him into temptatioa 'gets in of his own accord. It's surprising ho v.- many fei you have when yon don't need the There is no crime ui; earth a ion; ■wont' forgive a man if he tells i; that her beauty drove him io it. Sometimes our paths are Bint with red rose leaves, sometimes ti blue summonses. Women want everything that ee i:as, except moustaches and lib heads. Every dimple in a pretty girls & registers a dent in a man's hears. Diplomacy is, in the main, the ans! backing down with dignity after yu have gone t...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BRAW COUNTRY. Boy's Alleged Essay on Scotland [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

BRAW COUNTRY Boy's Alleged Essay on Scot, The following, stated to b- - t Bunbury schoolboy, is reprinted '1 the "Southern Tlreos," Bunbtm ^ Australia:— "Scotland is a bvaw wee lay ■ the north of England. It has nearly all round it. and wWsiA'8 a large part of if. "The population, is about foUt a-lialf millions, including Mr. ^ - Carnegie. It has a peculiar lac of its own, and i? one caa proa it coherently it is an infallibly" of sobriety. It possesses c®si .able mineral we;;. .. but very li it finds its way out of the conn "Gold has at times been disco^-i in certain districts, as well a3 n , pockets of certain natives, but a*1" cases it has been found 4®^' work. The besM.--.own eipj "I Scotland are Harry i .tinder ana ^ * ! whisky, though sulih.-icnt of the * : is retained in the country to a -,1 the needs of homo •■.'onsumjtion ' "The national <irr?s of Seotiati', the kilt, which is a kind of statu ticoat. In pattern rf-sembles a & board, though in coid weather ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN WOMEN "POP THE QUESTION." How the Fair Sex Helps Backward Wooers. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

WHEN WOMEN "POP THE QUESTION." How the Fair Sex Helps Backward Wooers. Mere man is often a peculiarly 'blate" mortal when it comes to such a. crucial test of courage as "popping the question." So much, indeed, is this the case that numbers of the fair sex have had to propose to back ward suitors, and they didn't wait for Leap Year either. Few of them popped the question in so many words l'or that would have been unmaidenly, but they managed subtly and surely to lead the bashful swain into the toils almost before he was aware of it. Thus one diffident wooer who hesi tated to ask the fateful query was assisted. "Frank," said his loved one, "auntie says if she likes my lover she will give us a house." There was a short pause, and then she went on, slyly, "I think my aunt likes you, Frank." Then, happily, Frank saw the drift of the remark, and, seizing the opportunity, won a wife and a house. Similarly situated was another dam sel who, having been assiduously wooed for some years by one...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Will Be Tame. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

Will Be Tame. "Do you think your wife will T3e happy when she gets the vote?" "I'm afraid she won't," replied Mr. Meekton. "Merely going to the polls and casting a ballot will seem pretty tame compared to organising these great suffrage demonstrations."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MAKING FARMING PAY. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

MAKING FARMING PAY. We are all trying to make things pay, but we refuse to invest enough brains in the study of things so that we can make them pay. Farming everywhere, and in everything, is a deep question, one o fthe profound est. It requires a lot of thought, study and good judgment to make it pay. Some must have an immediate profit, and so they skin the land. Oth ers try to save expense in laborN, and harvest no crop; others try to save ex pense in labor, and harvest no crop; others try to save expense in secur ing good breeding stock, and so pro duc cows theat do not giv the most profitable result. Others refuse to feed a good cow sufficiently to enable her to produce to her fullest capacity. All about us is this ever-present ques tion of making things pay, and saving useless, not useful, expense. Surely ther^ is neded a lot of wit and wisdom on the farm. A young girl was going to make lier first visit to a cousin in the country. At the station she was met by the cousin, and af...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

How to be happy on wash day: use Sunlight Soap THAT'S WHAT MOTHER USES rjl O INVBNTORB P ATENT S Obtained in Commonwealth and Else where for improved methods of Appli ances, Tools, etc., of any description Full Information, Costs, etc., sent on application to A. O. SACHSE, O.E. AUSTRALIAN WIDOWS' FUND BUILDINGS, Corner Collins and William Sts., MELBOURNE. vSjciXt ycm, dm/nfo {m -fuu/w omA c^otn xi R-O-B-U-R STATE SAVINGS BANK OF VICTORIA grants • i LOANS ON EASY TERMS. up to three fifths of valuation. ON BROAD ACRES v £2000 to £25000 ON TOWN PROPERTIES .. £500 to £25000 for a term of 3 or 5 years with option' of paying off a portion on any pay day. Interest 5 per cent. CREDIT FONCIER LOANS up to two thirds of valuation. ON FARMS £50 to £2000. Repayable by Instalments spread over 30 years, with interest at 5 per cent. Security may be either Freehold, or Crown Leasehold that could be made Freehold at any time on payment of the balance of Crown Rents. Loans may be granted for the purpo...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WIVES WORTH WINNING. Well-Known Novelists on Ideal Womanhood. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

WIVES WORTH WINNING. Weil-Known Novelists on Ideal Womanhood. Tastes, of course, differ, but men appear to wanfta wife who never ex isted except in romantic dreams. She must be a model of all virtues and possess no failings. She must be "so pretty that we are always proud, and so good that we are never uneasy; a woman who wears well and looks her ■best in two-year-old gowns; who ap plies the adjective 'important* in re lation to our work, our food, and our desire for unfettered holidays; who laughs at our small jokes and pre serves a marble face when we are scored off by others; with whom we have the massively comforting sensa tion that she will never recognise the plain, staring fact that we are not brave, not wise, not cleVer. The words quoted are those of that popular novelist, Mr. W. B. Maxwell, and "the astounding, incredible thing," he concludes, in his comments on the sort of woman a man likes, "is that, wanting all that, we sometimes get it." A truer note, perhaps, is struck...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE REVENGE AGENT. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

THE RLVENGE AGENT. By C. D. Coppinger in "London Opinion." Kenneth Seafortli was sitting de spondently in an armchair when his man entered the well-appointed room. "A gentleman to see you, sir, he SC>''Didn't I tell you I was not at home to anyone?" asked Kenneth irritably. "Who is it?" "I am not aware," said the servant ••0f 'is hideatity. 'E declined to hac quaint me with 'is name, ^marking that 'e preferred to deal dnect t vou sir. 'K concluded by hemphasis *in°-'that 'is business was himportant, '^"precise words bein' that it was of vital consequence." "Oh, tell him to go to the deuce, said Kenneth. ••Very good, sir," said the man, mov ing to the door. . "No, wait," said Kenneth, changing his mind; "show him ill, Curtis, 1 may as well see what he wants. Curtis went out, and returned m a £ew moments followed by a little c'iarp-1'eatured man with quick brown eyes, immaculately dressed and sport ing a large buttonhole. "Mr. Kenneth Seafortli?" he inquir 6Q. "Yes." said Kenneth. ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A JOURNALIST'S WORK AND HIS TRIALS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

A JOURNALIST'S WORK AND HIS TRIALS. By John Foster Fraser. Many aspirants ifor journalistic fame wantr'to be a special correspondent. It is an ideal life. - You go everywhere and s^ee everything. You are the ac credited representative of a great newspaper, and your profession is the open-Sesame to.witnessing all the his toric sights of your day. You may be sent to record the Durbar in India; or to describe a Presidential election in the.-.United States; or to witness fight ing ih.. the Balkans, and send thrilling despatches to your journal; or to have a-, good time at Cowes, writing about the regatta; or to attend huge poli tical demonstrations and provide pen pictures of the proceedings. And everywhere things are made easy and pleasant,-for the Press is a great fac tor in the land. It is a charmiiig picture, and I re memtber the time,, twenty-five years ago, "when, as a very junior writer, I looked upon the special correspondent as a very god in my profession, and I had dreams that...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

li. Geraldine naturally knew nothing of Bob Keating or his sins, and sho made but scant reference to them at the luncheon table. Old Farmer Rath way was sure to rob the Insurance Companies, she said, and what did it matter? The villagers had enjoyed a bonfire, and there was the end of it. Her manner toward Leila continued to be gracious; but while.it may have deceived her brother, the object of her new civilities was not to be de ceived. Leila believed her to be a kindly woman at heart, but one who was obsessed by this idea of saving Hugh from what she believed, quite conventionally, to be the penalties of his folly. For that, Leila saw, she would sacrifice much, and the so-call ed canons of hospitality first of all. No doubt some plan of action had oc curred to her and she was even then occupied in carrying it out. Leila felt herself surrounded by perils so sub tle that her woman's intellect could give no battle to them. She must leave this house; there could be no alernative. Upon...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FARM IMPLEMENTS. Their Care and Preservation. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

FARM IMPLEMENTS. Their Care and Preservation. / A matter which is very often ne ments. They are so often allowed to glected on farms is the care of imple lie aibout the place in all weathers that their periods of usefulness are seriously curtailed. After an imple ment has done its first season's won: the owner should, when stowinsj it in its proper place, see that it is in or der, and if there are any defects he should make a note of them, or, if convenient, it is better to have such defects repaired at once. Then he knows that his machine is ready for the next season's work. With such implements as the stripper or har vester, where belts are used, the belts should be removed and have a little oil rubbed on them, and ibe put at.ay in a cool place. The seed drill is an implement that requires a lot of care. A little extra attention will o<ften save two or three days' delay. Succ im plements as ploughs, harrows, culti vators, etc., which are of iron, do not require a shed s...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE PRODUCER'S POINT OF VIEW. What Is Farm Management? [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

THE PRODUCER'S POINT OF VIEW. What Is Farm Management? What is farm management? How is it to :be applied to farm problems as a method of work in their solution? If it is not a definite method of solving farm problems, it is not "worth while to pursue its study. The term has a definite significance; it is a distinct method of attacking individual farm problems. It signifies a well-ordered business; a clearly-defined system of conducting farm operations under a particular set of conditions. There is no more important problem before the farmers in this State than that of mak ing his farming more profitable. This cannot be done "without a more com plete and detailed knowledge of the business on individual farms. How does farm management help us to this knowledge? Farm manage ment in a word is the application of sound principles, good judgment and economic rules to the business of farming. In order to emphasize the importance of profit and to ensure the securing of a reasonable amount of...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO USE FERTILISERS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

HOW TO USE FERTILISERS. The guiding principle in the appli cation of manures is to use them as supplementary to the natural soil re sources, and not as a main source of fertility. Most good agricultural soils contain vast stores of dormant plant food, and the aim should be to develop as much as possible of this plant food latent in the soil by thorough cultiva tion, supplementing any deficiencies with fertilisers. What those deficient cies are can hest be found out by ac tual experiment, and, having deter mined them, the problem for each farmer and orchardist is to ascertain the most profitable and economic way of supplying the soil's needs. In all districts, with a light rainfall, super phosphate is likely to continue the most profitable of all phospliatic man ures. In the wetter areas, however, especially on soils deficient in lime, basic slag, or Thomas' phospfiate is i valuable adjunct to the production of good crops. When a man and a girl whisper to gether they are almost certa...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRECAUTIONS AGAINST MICE. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

precautions against mice. Many devices liave come under no tice from time to time to cope with the mice pest in the wheat or hay field. Building the stack upon a raised platform does not answer the purpose; the mice will climb up the 'blocks up on which the platform is built, run along underneath the platform boards, and so enter the stack. Enclosing the stack, as some farmers do, with fine wire netting, will also <be found un suitable, as the mice will climb up the wire netting. The only successful method to keep them out is to enclose the stack with a feiice of galvanised iron, either plain or corrugated, about two feet high. Let the iron into the ground to a depth of ofur inches, and place it in a slant ing position, pointing outwards from the stack, all around it; taking care to leave no open space at the cor ners; it will be found impossible for mice to enter a stack thus protected.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 10 April 1914

Wedding. THOMPSON—WATSON. A very pretty wedding was cele- brated at "Gladfield," Nanneella, on April 8th, when Mr Herbert J. J. S. Thompson, fifth son of the late Mr J. Thompson and Mrs Thompson, ''Almond Grove," Corop, was married to Miss Alice E. Watson, second daughter of Mr and Mrs J. Watson, Nanneella. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. H. S. Heath. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a beautiful bridal robe of ivory paillette silk, richly trimmed with silk lace, and pearls. A beautiful tulle veil over a wreath of orange blossom was worn and a lovely bouquet of white cosmos and ferns, tied with white satin ribbon was carried; the bride- groom's gift, a cable bangle, was also worn. The bridesmaid, Miss M Watson (sister of the bride) was daintily gowned in white Japanese silk, tango sash, and black velvet hat, and carried a bouquet of   carnations and ferns, tied with tango ribbon, and wore an amethyst pendant, gift of the bridegroom. Mr G. Thompson...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MAKING THE BISHOP LAUGH. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 17 April 1914

Making the bishop laugh. Probably one of the prettiest com pliments ever paid to the fair sex was that contained in tlie answer made by Dr. Potter, Bishop of New York, who was once asked by a lady why, in the many pictures and studies of angels exhibited, the angels were always de picted either as women or as young men without beards or moustaches. "Everyone knows," replied the Bishop, "that women naturally inherit the Kingdom of Heaven, but men only get in by a very close shave." This story is related by the Rev. T. Selby Henrey, \icar of St George (Brentford), whose little volume, en titled "Attic Salt," provides many an illustration of the fact that wit and appreciation of humor are not the least prominent characteristics of lead ing divines. He tells a story of the late Dr. Creighton, who once received a book from a second-rate author, to whom he replied by post, "I thank you very much for forwarding to me your book, and I promise you faithfully that I will not lose any time in ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Going Cheap. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 17 April 1914

Going Cheap. Some time ago a man was awaken ed in the night to find his wife weep ing uncontrollably. "My darling!" he exclaimed, "what is the matter?" "A dream!" she gasped. "I have had such a horrible dream." Her husband begged her to tell it to him, in order that he might com fort her. After long persuasion she was induced to say this:— "I thought I was walking down the street, and I came to a warehouse where there was a large placard, 'Husbands for sale.' You could get beautiful ones for' fifteen hundred pounds, or even for twelve hundred, and very nice-looking ones for as low as a hundred." The husband asked innocently: — "Did you see. any that looked like me?" The sobs became strangling. "Dozens of them," gasped the wife, "done up in bunches like asparagus, and sold for ten shillings a bunch."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE LOST LAKH OF GOLD. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 17 April 1914

THE LOST LAKH OF GOLD. (somewhere in north-western Ari zona—the precise whereabouts is now a matter of conjecture—is a lake of gold formed by Nature. On Decem ber 13, 1S5S, a party of gold-seekers, twenty-two men in all, were prospect ing in north-western Arizona when they came upon a band of nomad Apaches, who had with them consid erable gold, in the shape of nuggets and dust. After many pressing ques tions as to where they had obtained it, a half-bred Mexican volunteered to guide the white men to the spot for a consideration. He led them three hundred miles over a wild and desert country, to a spot near the head waters of the Gila river, where there were three mountain peaks in the form of a triangle. Here was a dried-up lake, the ancient bed a jumble of nuggets and gold-dust. The prospectors shov elled £40,000 worth into sacks, and twelve of them set out with it to Fort Yuma. They never reached Yuma, however, for they were am bushed and killed by Apaches in a defile since known a...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Let It Go at That. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 17 April 1914

Let It Go at That. A lady who is a district visitor be-' came much interested in a very poor, but apparently respectable, Irish fam ily named Curran, living on the top floor of a great building in a slum dis trict of her parish. Every time she visited the Currans the was annoyed by the staring and whispering of the other women living in the building. One day she said to Mrs. Curran: "Your neighbors seem very curious to know who and what I am, and the nature of my business with you." "They do," acquiesced Mrs. Curran. "Do they ask you about it?" "Indade they do, ma'am." "And. do you tell them?" "Faith, then, I do not." "What do you tell them" "Oo just tell them," was the calm reply, "that you are me dressmaker, an' let it go at that."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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