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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

rJTry. );.WI " ) ftfynt-ir f 1 JlVJX r Tj The Indian Advocate. 208 t; Primk Minister Waldeck-Rousseau Was decorated on Sunday with the order of ancient hen fruit. It took place at Havre (France) while he was landing from a yacht. X X The Navajo Indians of Arizona own 1,000,000. sheep, and the 22,000 members of that tribe find employment in work ing up the cheaper grades of wool unto the-famed vari colored blankets which are alike impervious to both cold and water. The conviction often forces itself upon us that one of the greatest miseries of our age is the thirst for notoriety. There are many people, like Erasmus, who would 'rather be' lied about than not to be talked about. Their highest ambition is to figure in print. Others who would be better employed saying their beads, write books; and fairly good catechists yearn to give lectures, and so on. The chief repugnance of the modern -dominie" is to be unnoticed; his greatest dreadi to become obscure. Contentment with one's lot is b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

V " jr. 209 The Indian Advocate. : rppi - ki As an insult to the ten millions of Catholics in the United States must be regarded the action of the Administration in sending Catholic young men from Porto Rico to the Indian school at Carlisle, Pa., to be educated therein as teachers for the public schools of the island, since it is a notorious fact that the Carlisle achool is under the direction of Capt. Pratt, a rampant A. P. A. Will our American Catholics look on in silence, as usual, lest their patriotism be doubted? X X Bishop Baraga, the Aposlle of the Chippewa Indians, is the latest candidate for canonization among the missiona ries of the United States. He came to this country in 1829. He began his ministry by preaching to the non-Catholics of the West. He was sent to the Northern Peninsula of Michi gan, and there for many years he lived and labored among the Indians, In his incessant journeys as priest or bishop, he often suffered untold hardships and bore miseries of every de...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

,'y'. ' ,r'" - i v v - The Indian Advocate. 210 Betting is rather out of place when something sacred is in question. So thought a frien'd of ours lately. We wiU call him "A." He contended that if he stood in the vesti bule of a certain church, on a given Sunday, and there ob served the incoming worshipers as they approached the holy water font, that only fifty per cent of them would properly bless themselves, whilst the other half would perform a meaningless fillip. If he was wrong, "A" was to recite five decades of the beads. If he was right, "B" was to recite the beads. "A" won easily. He would doubtless be ten de cades ahead if the, question was also, "How many genuflect properly?" The moral to this is that church-goers ought to act in such a way as to make these, pious wagers impossible. X X Without the aid of postage stamps, letter boxes, post offices, mail trains, or any of the various auxiliaries of the modern postal service, satisfactory communication is main- tained by the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

mmmmammmmm ttf ' V" -K4'Mtf',((H)'e'VJ' l- tT r!?y v. fifx-j jtr-v-jr -a- ywfrfr v J y - - p'v 211 The Indian Advocate. e !' f ' kWd be on a distant hunt, and hence not secure the missive till he travels along by the woodland postoffice some weeks after. Thus for the speedy transaction of business this unique postal service can scarcely be claimed to rival the long distance telephone. However, it is the system followed by the dusky Indians and their forefathers long before the telephone be came popular, even before the steamship and the express train supplanted the (anoe as a means of transport. a; a: Emperor Willum of Germany, who lately paid a visit to the Benedictine Abbey of Maria Laach to inspect the resto ration of its church, said to the Abbot: "Rest assured that in the future also my imperial favor will be extended over your Order; and that wherever men band themselves together to further the cause of religion and to carry it to the nations, they may be sure of my protection...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

The Indian Advocate. 212 consolation to the Christian soul than the knowledge that by the shedding of that Sacred Blood we were all redeemed. Not through any virtue of our own not through sacrifice on our part naught that we could have done would have been of avail simply and only by the grand and perfect offering of the Man God upon the altar of the Cross. If we have sinned, the thought of that Precious Blood rising to Heaven from the ever-burning censer of Christ's inundation is enough to make us cry "Pardon" with all the fervor of a repentant soul. If we suffer, either in mind or body, the ever-present memory of a suffering to which ours is nothing, strengthens to endure and accept it for the love of God and Our Blessed Savior. Do we mourn departed ones? Then, indeed, does the ever-present fount of that Precious Blood, still softly flowing like pleasant water through the darksome ways of Purgatory, become for us a sign ot hope and consolation to those loved ones who, without the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

Hit Hh iR"1 ft L ttr 'fstifjjy'Ti'!,vygvyifi',rrV' -" 'rTrvvr' r nw-t-'. 'fwrw?w'w irtfi 213 The Indian Advocate. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. PART III. CONCLUDED FROM MAY ISSUE. We have already demonstrated"4 two fundamental truths, viz: The necessity of a moral training in the education of youth, and the impossibility of any moral training based on merely human motives and sanction. Moral Law, as imply ing the notion of duty, rests on authority, and true authority is to be found in God alone, Creator and Supreme Law-Giver of mankind. There exists a generation of men, classified as spiritual ist philosophers, who 'recognize God as the foundation of Moral Law, inasmuch only as His intelligence, principle of every essence, and His will, principle of their existence, have created the world and ordained it, according to special laws, to its proper end. "This," they say, "is Natural Law. What is the need of a Revealed Religion, when the precepts of God are forever inscribed in our conscience th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

iT ,.TSSrtSWrT?"JS?P'" -vyo"'-j y- -' pvj .The Indian 'Advocate. 214 . . 5 the soul is the basis, not the whole constituent, of Moral Law. Three essential elements go to constitute Moral Law, viz: A clear, complete and organic legislation, an intelligent and moral being capable of fulfilling its precepts, and a sanction to enforce it. As we are now fighting an enemy that acknowl edges God's authority as the only foundation of Moral Law and man's free will as its necessary condition, our task is to demonstrate that Natural Law, as expressed by human con science, fails to fulfill each one of the above stated essential requirements of Moral Law. Where, at first, shall we find a clear, complete and har monious legislation outside of the precepts of a Revealed Religion? Conscience and will follow the understanding, and morality is the fruit of philosophy. Now, human teaching presents, and has ever presented, to the world the sad spec tacle of an implacable intellectual warfare, the logic...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

r,-j.,.MiM,,M,J M ,4,, " f fT sp 215 The Indian Advocate. object of 'natural knowledge, and also to the "weakness of our intellect and the intervention of our imagination." How many dissenting opinions on the origin, nature and destiny of man and on all other primary and necessary truths which are the foundation of ethics and the support of our moral 'life! And what an impossibility to draw out of such a Babel of philosophical systems the true, complete and homogeneous system of Moral Law! Spiritualist philosophers are by no means united in their conception of God's Providence, of the foundations and sanction of Moral Law, and especially of the nature of our future destiny. God is for some of them the Creator, not the Legislator, of man, whilst many others, dis believing any future reward or punishment, make of remorse of conscience the only sanction 'of violated law. The task would not be hard to refute their respective theories, but suf fice it to show the want of a precise, syste...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

B??WB'Jfl " Si The Indian Advocate. 216 philosophy conciliate these facts? If man is practically un able to persist in the constant observation of Moral Law, how is he responsible for all his transgressions? And once he has transgressed the law, shall he ever regain the friendship of his Creator? And how shall he do it? The highest philoso phy, left to its own inspiration, has no answer to solve these fundamental and mysterious questions. As long as moral philosophy deals with man deprived of the inspiration and the grace of God, it deals with a being incapable, as experience teaches us, of constantly fulfilling his duty, although bound to do'it, and uncertain as to what course to take after he has forfeited his moral obligations. - As for moral sanction, our spiritualist philosophers are more divided than ever to ' determine its nature and extent. Whilst all agree to affirm the immortality of the soul, some make our eternal felicity consist in the contemplation of ab stract truth a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

Ynff i.lV' Tywr wyy, jf -, y y? ""KJr- Wr-Yjumvv.''li'1 "'iTp 217 The Indian Advocate. r ir ' fulfills the essential requirements of Moral Law; since on the other we are in the presence of a positive Religion that claims to possess the word of God to fill and correct the deficiencies of philosophy and enlighten us on the mysteries of this life and of the next, it is our plain duty, on questions that interest our soul for time and eternity, to study the veracity of Re vealed Faith and reasonably to assent, after conscientious inquiry and criticism, to such form of Revealed Religion as realizes the essential qualities of unity, stability, complete ness and moral perfection. Truth alone is one, immutable, complete fn the solution of problems and morally perfect. A true Christian accepts every ray of light that reason and philosophy can spread, and applies for the rest to the teach ings of true Religion, after duly authenticating their veracity and integrity. Cantabfr. 0itStrUSSiim THE ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

--' The Indian. Advocate. 218 J THE CHURCH IN GERMANY DURING THE PAST CENTURY. CONTINUED FROM JUNE NUMBER. About this time the famous "Brannsberg School quar rel" drose. Two Catholic teachers disregarded the Church and taugh.t schismatical doctrines in the school. Their Ordi nary, 'the Bishop of Ermland, ordered them (after the usual warnings) to discontinue giving religious instruction, and re quested the Government to appoint other teachers. The Ber lin Court saw opposition to the Government in this, and re fused to appoint other teachers. The Bishop good-naturedly offered to retain the teachers for secular subjects and to ap point religious instructors out of his own purse. The Gov ernment refused the offer and forced the children, to attend the lessons of the former teachers. These had now gone so far. that their Ordinary found cause to excommunicate them. As they continued to give religious instructions most parents withdrew their children from the school. Catholics formed the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

wtpwfitFWirrfvr' $?" FTIfJ'f1?TOPiV ""-I P 2ig The Indian Advocate. MtV I' J5 fluence in such a way at the next Papal election that a Pope friendly to Protestants might be chosen. Now began the persecution against the Jesuits, whom Bis marck called "those dogs." They were banished together with the Redemptorists, Lazarists and others. In 1873 a law was passed forbidding religious communities to teach; this law extended to all religious Societies, the Children of Mary, the Confraternities and the like; but secular clubs amongst youth were to be especi?Uy encouraged. In future no Catho lic army chaplains were 10 be appointed, and those then hold ing office were "pensioned off." Bismarck ordered Bishop Krementz of Emerland to annul the excommunication against the two Braunsberg teachers. On the bishop's retusal Bismarck called him a rebel and stopped the payment of his annuity. Now followed the "May-laws," aimed against the religious instruction of youths and church students, and prohi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

lVV!mym7 jj"'V-W'5 r- i, . ' The Indian Advocate. - 220 A - LOCALS. ' " .nnnnnrLnnn. ' Died, June 1, Mrs, Philomena Becotte, after a long and painful ill- ;'? ness. R. I. P. " As, we go to press, we learn that June 23 will be First Communion t day at St, Mary's, Wanette, Okla. V On June 2d, many children of Sacred Heart Church, El Reno, Okla., partook for the first time of the Lord's Supper. ' Our Parochial School, which opened on February 4th last, and Jv closed on June 17th, had an average attendance of 51 pupils. " v f, On Pentecost Day, May 26th, Mr. Moses Bruno and Miss Frances f Shapoiuck were made one. They were both pupils of our Indian schools. ( The Pottawatomie Indians will hold a great council on June 24. "This council is called," sas the notice, "for the purpose of devising ways E5jfc and means towards securing another home for ourselves and onr descend- . ants." Our next issue will contain the proceedings of this event. On June 9th, five children, two boys and three gi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

22 1 'The' Indian Advocat'Ev I. st it. . R- opened to settlement on April 22, 1889, and at the census taken in May, i8go,,had a population of 78,475, including 16,641 Indians and other per sons specially enumerated, but not included in the general report on popu lation at that census. At the census of 1900 it had a population of 398,331, or an increase since 1890 of 407.6 per cent; in other words, its population in 1900 is more than five times as large as the entire population returned in 1890. ' . On Monday morning, June 17th, the children of Sacred Heart Mis sion School held their closing exhibition. Though the weather was all that could be desired, the attendance was not. very large, owing, to the fact that pressure of farm work kept many, away; still there was. a fair .audience. Rev. Father Blaise opened the exercises with a few well-timed and pleasing remarks, at the close of which the children, in their order, rendered their respective recitations and dialogues. Where all did ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

IP "fJWPHBW VWitQP1,!?"'"" ' ' W3?J3!93fKWw-?'A(? v"'iPFrcvr-XTrrir,', v-"i The Indian Advocate Vol. XIII. AUGUST, 1901. No. MARY ASSUMED. In an Eastern town a Maiden dwelt, , Fair as a Summer dawn i With eyes so softly bright and deep, One, gazing, wondered what they saw O'er harvest-fields asleep, ,Vu,t v Now, clothed like the sun and crowned with the stars, J" r, ' . O love of the Mighty One! 1 ' ' , Maid with soft eyes, and fair young face, v Yet Mother of God's own Son! ' ' Never again will thy weary feet - Tread over the blood-stained stones; Never again will thy gentle heart Break over His fainting moans. He has crowned thee Queen for thy loyal lovev He has named thee Mother of Grace! Our Mother too! O bend thine eyes! " Turn not from us thy face. h Purest of all, save He Divine Who dwelt within thy breast, Guard us and lead us while life lasts 'Till at His feet we rest. . ' , , A. S. li .. -i jii. ic, , -i- .. PV-jja. . 11 .i .ix..-,L ,et .JMi.l.ilu. -?t. , t

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

rmwjyfr rrT'Y -.J;ll 223 The Indian Advocate. THE INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA. CHEYENNE 'AND ARAPAHOE. extract from the governor's report. Maj. George W. H. Stouch, United States Indian agent 'for these tribes, furnishes the following interesting informa tion relative to their condition and progress: This agency, known as Darlington, was established in 1870, and is pleasantly located on the north fork of the Canadian River, -i4 miles from Fort Reno, and 5 miles from El Reno, the county seat of Canadian County. The census of June 30, 1900, shows a population of Cheyenne 2,037, Arapahoe, 981; total, 3,018. These Indians are very advantageously situated, and there is no good reason if it were not for their general antipathy to manual labor and their dependence for subsistence upon the issue of rations, their semi-annual per Capita payment, and rental derived from leasing allotments to white men why they should not in time become a self-supporting people. From reading published official reports...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

-,p-j yiTiwy 5?fTr,Tr,'Tf f "vjfy$W''-,r ' The Indian Adyocate. 224 rw l , interest is paid to them per capita semi-annually. During the fiscal year there was collected as rentals of allotments to white' farmers and cattlemen $42,120.83. The prices at which raw land- is being leased for farming purposes range from 25 to 50 cents per acre, owing to its locality and quality; for Chief of the Cheyenne. grazing, 20 cents per acre. Many of the first leases made in 1895 will ex pire this year, when all the broken land will be leased at about Si an acre. This, of course, will bring in considerable more revenue than has been re ceived in the past. Each able-bodied male adult is required to reserve one home allotment, and my aim will be to gel them to occupy and improve the same. On the one hand, these Indians" are considered wards of the Govern- l.iatfcj&fc.uatirt. U- .. .s. r .

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

wmjlF&yrtr.iuv'rVT?f- w , -viTirsrwts?rvifr-,) ty-w, -"TirpFFao 'fi'5'By,,r'yt 225 The Indian Advocate. raent; on the other, citizens. It has been beyond me so far to draw the line where the one leaves off and the other begins. The Indians are sup posed to be amenable to the Territorial courts and have the same protection from the same accorded to the other citizens, but I fear they fail to get it; they are treated as legitimate prey and have little show in the lower courts. These Indians, like so many others, have had citizenship thrust upon them when they are so fearfully unprepared for it. The schools have been quite successful, notwithstanding the fact that the attendance was not what it should have been. It is expected to mate rially increase the attendance if pupils can be found. The children have enjoyed exceptionally good health, and there is every reason to believe that the ensuing session will be productive of even better results than the last. This has been a splendid...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

"iWWWV 3Erwv wssyCTi'w " v- ?viwt"f ; "re'j'rT-'1Jg' "'wf , r vr?- xyv The Indian Advocate. 226 range is known as the Choiskai mountains, and here the top is flat and mesa-like in character, dotted with little lakes and covered with giant pines, which in the summer give it a park like aspect. The general elevation of this plateau is a little less than 9,000 feet above the sea and about 3,000 feet above the valleys or plains east and west of it. The continuation of the range to the northwest, separated from the Choskai only by a high pass, closed in winter by deep snow, is known as the Tunicha mountains. The sum mit here is a sharp ridge with pronounced slopes and is from g, 000 to 9,400 feet high. On the west there are numerous, small streams, which, rising near the summit, course down the steep slopes and finally discharge through Canyon Chelly into the great Chinlee valley, which is the western of the two valleys referred to above. The eastern slope is more pro nounced than the we...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

SHS5?SS$S 227 " The Indian Advocate. ' i. The valleys to which reference has been made are the Chinlee on the west and the Chaco on the east of the princi cipal mountain range described. Both run nearly due north, and the former has a fall of about 2,000 feet from the divide, near the southern reservation line, to the northern boundary, a distance of about 85 miles. Chaco valley heads farther south and discharges into San Juan river within the reserva tion. It has less fall than the Chinlee. Both valleys are shown on the maps as occupied by rivers, but the rivers ma terialize only after heavy rains; at all other times there is only a dry, sandy channel. Chaco "river," which heads in the continental divide, carries more water than the Chelly, which occupies Chinlee valley, and is more often found to contain a little water. The valleys have a general altitude of 5,000 to 6,000 feet above the sea. The base of the mountain range has an average breadth of only 12 or 15 miles, and it is a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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