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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

THE RANCH Office 37f, Oilman Building, Seattle. MILLER FKEEMAN, Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors j K. WAhhEN, 11. L. BLANCHARU MEiS. s. <;. WEBBTBR. Issued the First and Fifteenth of Month Subscription, In advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 80 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle sub scribers ;ire required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted In every town to so licit subscriptions. Good commissions and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti tied in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, :is we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and address, and Jill arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration is shown nn your paper by address label •containing your name. Failing to recei...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDF.N One of the new fruits that has come to stay is the Loganberry. It is a cross between the raspberry and the blackberry. Some of the agricultural papers are giving Luther Burbank, of Santa Rosa, Cal., the credit of mak ing this cross, but that is a mistake. The cross was purely accidental and occurred in the garden of Dr. Logan in California. Blackberry and rasp berry canes grew together in his gar den and he planted some of the seed with the result of the new berry, winch was named in his honor. Luther Burbank has made a similar cross by u»a methods of hybridizing and calls his new berry the Phenomenal. Bur bank'a new berry is very similar to the accidental cross in the garden of Dr. Logan. This establishes beyond any doubt what kind of a cross orig inated the Loganberry. The Phenom enal Its said to be in no way better than the older cross. * • * The Loganberry la a very fine berry in appearance and its quality is ex cellent. It has been quite plentiful in t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

.appearance than fruit raised without irrigation. Why is this so? The simple answer is that the irrigated tree is fed better. It is not allowed to have its nourishment for a time and then be starved for a time. If you are feeding steers, which will make the better beef —the one fed regularly with all it can eat or the one which is fed well for a time and then half starved for a time? So it is true that, the tree that gets its nourishment regu larly and all it can use will bear big ger and better appearing fruit than the tree that, is fed well for a time and starved for awhile, which often hap pens where we depend on rainfall to prepare the nourishment. But let it never be forgotten that the nutriment that comes in through the roots of a tree gives it its quality as well as its size and appearance. So, other things being equal, the large fine appearing apple will be higher in quality than the little half starved one. A runt is never good. * * * But there is another factor that enters...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

(i THE DAIRY Kind of Cream Gatherer Wanted. Now that the system of gathering cream has become necessary, it is of very great importance that there be a suitable class of men educated for the position of cream gatherer, says the Farming World. The responsibil ities of the position are many, and the need of a good, intelligent, consci entious man is urgent. A lot of tact is necessary to smooth out little mis understandings with the patrons, and a lot of real dairy knowledge is re quired to be able to explain the rea sons for variation in the cream tests and many other vexatious questions which arise. Perfect satisfaction cannot be ex pected from the engagement of a cream gatherer who has not worked in the creamery and acquired a knowl edge of testing, separating, butter making and creamery bookkeeping. Good men can often be hired from among the farmers themselves, but there are very few amongst these who are not woefully lacking in some very important qualification. One may have a has...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

last season for hay. Have a fine stand md will be able to tell you more about i pastures in the future. My brother writes me from Vermont ! hat tho man that brought his cows up to average 600 pounds butter a year, cut his hay six times. I would watch ihe hay closely and just as soon as it a ill do put it into stack. I don't know much about alfalfa hut I do know that the other grasses— (lover, timothy, etc., can be put in pretty green, and be the better if mere is some water in it —yes, a great deal better than having it all dried out. 1 do not believe that it is econo my to milk cows on hay alone. Cull i hem, to have only good ones. Keep a small number, and feed at least eight pounuß of grain. Wheat and oats -round together are among the best of feeds; so is barley. A small per cent, of rye added is the best of all. At St. Charles all the farmers take l heir milk to the factory, or used to. They largely bought their cows fresh. They fed them heavy so that when they stopped giving mi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

& HOUSEHOLD IfKS. 8. O. WKBBTKR B«nd communication* for thla department to Mrs. 8. O. Webster. 11l Colma» Block, Seattle, or direct U The Ranch. All «um tlon« will be carefully answered; contribu tion* for publication are welcome. The Care of the Hands. This is not the kind of article you think it is going to be! This is not something to make your hands white and soft and dimpled! This is not to care too much lor them. Don't care so much for your hands that you can not do weli whatever work you have to <10. Do not save your hands if you are the daughter and let your mother wash the dishes—and if you are the mother do not do all the drudgery to save your young girls' hands from getting rough. Never consider what the work is going to do to your hands -just divide the work as conscienc ioiisly as thougfi you were sharing a box of candy, being as just to yourseu as to anybody else, (for that's where true Justice conies in), and if your bands* get rough look to that after ward. Th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

simple skirt with a black velvet belt, and a bow with short ends at the side, and long black silk gloves, also a mack and white hat. it was very in expensive, but still it was very trim and pretty. Mary C. —Witchhazel is very sooth ing to a sunburned skin, and lemon juice with water is excellent for re moving freckles. Ida C. M. —I will resume my shop ping in the autumn. At present 1 am teo ousy witn other things I can not attend to it. A. B. C. —If your eyebrows and lashes are too blonde send me a ■tamped envelope and 1 will give you name of satisiactory application to uarken them. You are right in think ing iney detract irom your appearance, out you must be careiul not to man* i hem 100 dark, as mat will be even worse. Alfalfa Without Irrigation. An experiment by L. E. Ensor, who is a prosperous larmer in the vicinity of Reardan, indicates that Turkestan alfalfa can be grown in that section successlully witnout irrigation. Mr. lOnsor last fall seeded about five acres 10 'lurkestan...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

10 POULTRY ————— H. L,. BLANCHARD Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detail** ana questions prove of great benefit. Writ* to H. U Blanchar* at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Poultry Need Green Vegetables. All raisers of poultry do not realize the advantages of variety in food; this lias been referred to in this depart ment several times, but more partic ularly in reference to the grain ration. It applies, however, just as well to the green food portion; because the fowls are on the range it does not follow that they find much variety in the grasses they eat, and it will do them an immense amount of good if they can have some of the discarded vegetables, both tops and roots, that come from the garden. We have found it an excellent plan, even in summer, to feed our growing chicks in the morning a mash composed of wheat bran witli a sprinkling of oil meal in it and then completing the mash with about a quart of finely chopped vegeta...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

THE MAKING OF SWISS CHEESE. (F. Marty.) A book perhaps could be written if we were to go into every particular of the manufacturing process of Swiss < heese. I shall, however, touch only upon some of the effective wants and needs which today we are contemplat ing, and how these may be overcome. An ideal drum Swiss cheese is desired by the dealers. The evidence goes to show that we are in need of a fancy Swiss cheese, since there are annually over 85,000 cwt. fancy Swiss cheese imported. This cheese is of a fancy brand, but it we were to trace it back to its man ufacturing point we would find a cheese factory with a valuation of from $10,000 to $15,000, equipped with all Ihe modern improvements. It is evi dent that many of our best, cheesmak ers cannot manage their work in a satisfactory manner, due to the inef fective and poorly-constructed build ings. After two years of study and inspection of the foreign cheese work I am convinced of the lack of equip ment, and the necessity of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

12 THE, FIELD Oat Smut and Its Damage. (Edgar C. Kichey.) It is probable that there is uo other class ol plum diseases which cause as much damage to tne oat crop of tne country as the smuts. The smut ot oats is more widely distributed than almost any ot the other plant para sites. It is known on every continent, and occurs all over the United States. Fields entirely free lrom it are rare; and the aggregate amount of damage which it does is very great. I'ew larm !.ts who grow oats every year have ;iny adequate conception of the extent of the ravages of this pest. Professor Kellerman and Mr. Swingle have esti mated that the actual loss in Kansas lrom oat smut from 1888 to 181 M) was ut. least $2,114,181; the percentage of smutted heads varying from ti.s to 15 per cent. A conservative estimate of the direct loss caused by smut would oe 8 per cent, of the crop, and at this estimated the loss in the United States alone would be over $18,000,000 an nually. Not many farmers who grow oats w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

LIVE STOCK Beef Production. The lowa experiment station is out with the report on feeding d iff (rent types of steers. The bulletin gives the result of a year's feeding test with si(crs of the beef and dairy type and includes the slaughter test and meat demonstration, (he latter by Mr. Jno. (Josling. The investigation sought to prove which is the most profitable type of steer for the feeder, and considered both the amount of gain and the value of the finished steer. This is what is considered a beef type: Beef Type—An animal of low set, compact, blocky general appearance, displaying vigor in the general bear ing and carriage, without, any indica tion of restlessness or nervousness. in form short and broad in the head, broad in muzzle, with large nostrils and large mouth; the neck short, thick and very smoothly blended with the shoulders; breast full and wide; shoul ders broad, yet compact at top and smoothly covered with muscle on sides; back and loin broad, with fore ribs arching w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

14 the sheep business because he has somehow got an idea that he must be peculiarly fitted for the task of raising or feeding sheep. This is a mistake. Bheep are just as hardy and just as easily raised as any other domestic animal. Like any other animal, they are subject to disease, but with proper care and warm, dry quarters they are easily kept, healthy and hardy. There is profit in a flock of sheep, and the sooner the farmers of this country find it out the better off they will be. The demand for mutton is constantly and rapidly increasing, and there is no danger of an overproduc tion. The great range countries of the west are being rapidly taken up by settlers, and the day is coming when wo must depend upon the farm er to supply the mutton that is now produced on the ranges, the same as he now supplies the pork. As we said above, it is high time the farmer shook himself and awoke to his op portunities. — The Small Farmer and Sheep. The attractive prices being paid for wool this ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

ble in farrowing, but will be likely to have little milk for her pigs. The management of sows prior to farrow ing should therefore aim to maintain bodily vigor and all of the organs In a normal and healthy condition. This being the case, the mammary glands will also be healthy and perform their natural function perfectly. Do not stuff the sow upon any fat tening food prior to farrowing. Corn is most apt to cause trouble, perhaps, but any other food used in large quan tities while exercise is restricted will produce similar bad effects. The food of the pregnant sow should contain sufficient succulence or laxative prin ciple to keep the bowels freely open. Slops of middlings and flaxseed meal are popular with swinebreeders as an offset to the constipating effects of corn for pregnant sows, while others prefer roots and some are experiment ing with silage. The chief aim in our opinion should be to breed a milking strain of sows and then feed and nianasn to enhance the hereditary trait....

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

L 6 MAKE LIFE EASY <^t -**" t^^^^^S^^^lKKß^'- ■ Dons the Tubular, while the "other kind of Cream Separators keep their users ;^' '*'Jft^ ■•■ *\\fflj& 'chained to the galleys, " for they have the old pattern heavy bucket bowl, filled with I^^SSmiS^l^P<^i^m^S^Mt all kinds of contraptions, such as "pie plates," "horse radish grates," "sieves," etc., r^^BHESSß^S^^^^H^Sll so difficult to thoroughly cleanse. If any of your neighbors have any such machines, I t^^^BßaßiSTO^S^teßaM'- call around and take a careful look at their "lay-out," and ask the good wife how she h'fli^n 119 likes the old of wasnin £ and scouring all these parts twice a day. Perhaps she : f ,e^SHHH^.. W : has been driven to the extremity of washing them only once a day. If so, we do : l*l^rn?sl^Hßß^ W not Mame her, although we would not care to recommend the quality of cream which fe^BS§^^^fcJ«S^PJ^^:'- 9 has been run through an unwashed separator bowl, thus giving it that well-known •^■3Ktrmß&BsfflKm "4ft...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1905

Kt 1 __.^^^Kzg^^^^=^^^B^^^BMl^^ . fl^^B^^^^^^B^^^SfflHaSS^^Lr^^^^MaB^ja^BK' >S S5^ 1 . VOL. XXI f NO. 16. CO-OPERATIVE DAIRYING AT SUNNYSIDE There are two reasons why co operation among farmers is more easily secured in an irrigated than a rainfall country. First: Irrigators are interdependent rather than inde pendent. The irrigator can not simply "attend to his own business." By force of circumstances he must take an interest in the neighbors above as well as below him on the same system of ditches. It is only by co-operation in the fullest sense that the best dis tribution of water can be secured. It is impractical for a company or an in dividual to give irrigators a good water service. They must get this for themselves. And this is why the irri gation systems should be owned and controlled by the people. The second reason is that on account of the small farms, 10 to 40 acres, the farmers are brought Into close touch with each other. Here at Sunnyside we have districts with as ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1905

2 equal to clover hay in feeding value especially for sheep. Peas are more commonly used as a pasture when sown in conjunction with some other kind of grain, and since they are more easily injured by the trampling of live stock than other grain crops, it is usual to pas ture mem only with sheep or swine. When sown with oats or barley they make a good summer pasture for sheep. The greatest objection to such a pasture is in the uarliness with which it is produced. Of course, it may be grown later, but in such case it will not produce such an abund ant crop. Peas grown in conjunction with some other kind of grain are of great value as a soiling crop, owing first, to the large yields obtained (from 10 to 20 tons per acre being a good yield on average soils), second to the high nutritive value of the food, combined with its palatability and third, because of its timeliness. This crop is ready as soon as the spring grasses begin te fail, and it may be made to continue in season until corn...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 Oolman Building, Seattle. MILLER FKEEMAN, Editor and Proprietor Associate mditors P. WAI,DEN, H. L. BLANCHARD MRS. S. G. WEBSTER. Issued the First and Fifteenth of Month Subscription, In advance, one year 50 cents; six months. i'O cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle sub scribers iire required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to so licit subscriptions. Good commissions and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration Is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the pa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1905

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDEN lOnoe upon • a time I was passing along the' streets of, a '.city and as I am wont to do, I stopped' in front of a book stall. ,'v Some. were second! hand books and were 1 quite 1 cheap. I found one volume" labeled "Autobiography of Anthony Trollop" I"and,,'bought it for 25 cents, si.Trollop was a great, novel writer and produced very many-books Tii telling of his own experience"-' in writ-ing books he makes* the following statement: "There is a ereat differ between a man who.has to write a book and the man who has a booV to write a .book has a hard task bo- Piibiishers' after his 1 books ' became popular, to 1 write a book and was' often nroffered a large Birth of money for do ir>£r so. He' says hp would in no case undertake th* 3 task unless he had a book ito i write. 'i! He' makes; the state' ment emoted above 1 and 1 then goes on to' mv that any one ' who ' undertakes to write a book simply because he has a' book to ;: write has a hard 'task' be forp ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1905

seed the land to clover or some other legume for a few years and then per haps raise potatoes a year or two and then reset to trees. If the ground is suitably located I will follow my apple orcnard with a peach orchard or the reverse. An old apple tree gets too high and too scrubby to be profitable High trees are hard to prune, hard to spray and it is hard to gather their trait Better by far dig them out and after a time plant new trees than to tool away your time on the old trees. * * * There is extensive inquiry abou|; the coming apple crop. I had a peculiar experience a few days ago. A man by the name of Appel of the firm of Appel & Ujffy, of New Orleans, called on me and we had a half hour's talk on the question of apples the coming fall. Mr. Appel thinks he would like to buy several carloads of northwestern ap ples tor their trade in the southern city. Prof. H. E. Van Deman says mat he knows the firm and commends them as good and reliable men. Mr Appel had not been gone ten...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1905

c THE DAIRY Overripe or Tainted Milk. (John Brodie.) In handling overripe milk at cheese factories, there is no doubt but the best method is to return it to the pa tron who sent it, as there is positively no excuse whatever for the cheese maker who accepts it, or the patron who delivers it. The cheesemaker has in the acidi meter a quick and accurate method of ascertaining the exact per cent, oi acidity in milk as it is delivered, and if he rejected all that had over .21 per cent, of acidity he would not have overripe milk to make up, and if he set this standard and impressed on the patrons the absolute necessity of cooling milk to GO or 65° he would avoid the unpleasant duty of returning it. This is certainly a case in which the ounce-of-prevention-is-worth-a-pound-of cure remedy is very applicable, and if patrons only realize the loss they sustain by delivering overripe or tainted milk at factories I think they would make an effort to deliver it al ways clean and sweet. If the chee...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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