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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

June 1994 FB rollover protection grant to save lives By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND-On May 3, a 62-year-old Virginia Farm Bureau Federation member was killed by an overturned tractor. Farm Bureau wants to see that this doesn't happen again. The man had been dealing brush on a hill when his tractor turned over and landed on top of him. The tractor was not equipped with special safety equipment called Rollover Protective Structures, or ROPS. If it had been, the man may still be alive. But his case is far from unique. According to the 1993 edition of Accident Facts, published by the National Safety Council, overturned tractors have the highest fatality rate for accidents occurring on farms. This is based on reports from 25 states covering more than 65 percent of farm tractors in the U.S. Overturned tractors accounted for 53 percent of all on-farm tractor fatalities reported in 1992, according to the book. Many of these cases could have been prevented with ROPS, said Br...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

6 Llamas g~| ~ useful, fun, profitable - tC\ I Llama Association of the 7 * I Llamas as sentries # . A . # Alpacas and Llamas J Mld-AtlantlC States produce fine fiber I \_ Jl % Don't miss these llama events sponsored by J iWvv >vK IU / \ For more information I \ /S \ about L»A#M#A#S I, \ May 28-29, 1994 £ . J brochure, "Learning 11 f * Llamas can perform Culpeper Expo '~7 || amas C ° n tact I Virginia State Fair S Llamas for breeding I September 25 & 26, 1994 There are a number of other llama events JdV I lomflo n*m mill nai4o Virgina State Fair Grounds to be held in Virginia and its surrounding " Richmond, Virginia states in the next year. LAMAS members •% & J \ Contact: Dale Graham will be happy to let you know when they I+JT * are where they will take place. H Llamas for parades Llamas for packing and hiking You can f show llamas Llamas are for sharing | The following farms would welcome your visits or inquiries and have llamas or alpacas for sa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

June 1994 Members' opinions needed to form Farm Bureau policy ■ jiarm Bureau policy is your policy. And if you want to help your county Farm J? Bureau develop policies on issues that will affect you, take a few minutes to fill out this questionnaire. The following questions relate to vital agricultural topics that affect farmers both directly and indirectly. Questionnaires will be used in forming policies that will be voiced in the Virginia General Assembly, Congress, and governmental agencies. How Policies Develop Farm Bureau's policy development program provides Farm Bureau producer members an opportunity to participate in the policy development process. These policies are the basis for Farm Bureau's beliefs and related activities. District Policy Development Meetings Held in each of Farm Bureau's seven field districts. Allow key county Farm Bureau leaders to bring state and national issues to the surface and to hear forecasts on issues that likely will be considered on the state ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

8 Rotational grazing helps dairymen earn, farm green By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor CRIMORA —Dairymen Bill and Crawford Patterson have found a farming method that's as economically-friendly as it is environmentally-sound. Rotational grazing, or grass dairying as it's often called, has tripled the twin brothers' income and has enabled them to enjoy their personal life instead of spending it in the barn. "I'd quit dairying before I went back to doing it the traditional way," said Bill Patterson Jr., who began dairy farming with his brother in 1978. The Pattersons bought 120 acres in 1977 and began a traditional dairy operation the following year. They were milking 60 cows twice a day and feeding corn silage and hay. By 1991 they had the highest producing 2x (milked two times a day) dairy herd in Virginia. The average cow was giving 24,850 pounds of milk per year. However, while some may consider that an achievement, the brothers were dissatisfied. "We found that our income had...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

June 1994 H-2A program more stringent (Continued from Page 1) The DOL is looking out for the U.S. worker, but they're not looking out for the U.S. farmer," Coffee commented. Current requirements of the H-2A program include: ♦ Housing must be provided, free of charge, to workers who are unable to return to their residences within the same day. The housing must meet the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Virginia Employment Commission and county health department standards for housing migrant workers. ♦ Workers' compensation insurance must be provided at no cost. ♦ Tools, supplies and equipment needed to perform the job must be provided at no cost. ♦ Three meals per day must be provided if the employer has a food service, with daily costs to the workers not to exceed $6.66 per day. ♦ Transportation to and from the place of employment must be provided. ♦ Transportation between the living quarters and the worksite must be provided. ♦ The employer must actively recruit U.S. w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

10 Sometimes You Find The Answer a f In The Strangest j \ Places! Who would ever think of looking in a / \ * 1f ' Farm Bureau office for the answer to f S*' their health insurance needs? / Y $1,700 \f )- ( Savings Jp~ Mrs. V.S. of Russell County, Va. did — and she found the answer: L _/ * "I saved over $1,700 in annual premiums/' So did more than 25,000 Virginians — and they found the answers to their health insurance problems. We know the average American is finding it tough to find adequate health insurance and to pay his medical bills. That's why the VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU has teamed up with BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD OF VIRGINIA to offer several health insurance programs designed to fit your needs. Contact the Virginia Farm Bureau — That's Where You'll Find The Answer! ACT TODAY! Send for your FREE HEALTH INSURANCE INFORMATION PACKAGE. If you don't have medical coverage and are not already eligible for Blue Cross and Blue Shield group coverage, contact the Virginia Farm Bureau. Ca...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

June 1994 "HEAVY BREED" SPECIAL! Got big Reds, big Bufl White Rods, ft huge Silver Laced Hack Giants Super healthy easy-to-n»e chicks tor only $18.95 per /% v hundred phs postage and 1 1/2 cents each pack p . - m ing lee 50 tor $12.95. Our choice pullets, cfcis, \ st run mixed together as available. Order now* We ship C.O.D Send name and address, or telephone (717)426-3411. RED TOP CHICK FARMS J . - *»• R.D. 1, MARCTTA, PA 17547 your dental bills more painful than having your tooth drilled? We can't do much about the pain in the dentist chair... but our new dental insurance plan will take away the "pain" from his bills. The Virginia Farm Bureau through Acordia Benefits of the South, Inc., offers a unique dental plan. Coverage includes prevention, diagnostic, and restorative dental procedures including fillings, extractions, oral surgery and periodontal and endodontic treatment. There's no need to worry about dental bills any longer. The cost of our plan is reasonable and offers both...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

12 Edible flowers add a splash of color, flavor to gardens Your garden may be in full swing, but a few spaces in your flower or vegetable beds may be calling for a splash of color or a little spice. Lively, easy-tx>grovv, edible nasturtiums may be just what is needed to fill in the gaps. Dwarf nasturtiums can brighten up an annual border or win- dow box. The colorful cultivar WJurlybird reaches only 1 foot in height. Jewel, another dwarf, grows to 15 inches and carries its sweet-scented blossoms well above the foliage. Dwarf types look showy when planted in front of taller flowers; for example, zinnias and marigolds. Semi-trailing nasturtiums, such as the award-winning Gleam series, bear large, fragrant, semi-double and double flowers in shades of yellow, orange and scarlet. They reach a length of 2 to 3 feet, making them ideal for containers and hanging baskets. The vivid flowers stand out when mixed with trailing vinca or ferns. Climbing nasturtiums generate 6- to 8foot...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

June 1994 Young farmers reminded of farm safety, contests Planting season is upon us, and we would like to remind everyone to practice farm safety. With the beautiful weather we've been having, it is very easy to over exert ourselves trying to make every minute count in the fields. Overexertion can lead to carelessness, so please be safety conscious. We are pleased to announce that JI Case Company selected Virginia as one of the 19 states offered a Case IH Maxxum tractor as a state award Farmers sue for right to use sludge as fertilizer MANASSAS—The lines have been drawn in Rappahannock County, and federal and state judges will have to decide whether or not farmers there will be allowed to use municipal sewage sludge as fertilizer. Court hearings began this week on lawsuits filed by four local farmers upset the county government has ordered a total ban on the use of sludge. Opponents of sludge as fertilizer charged it would decrease their property values and raise unfounded safety f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept ./Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec ./Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

June 1994 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 14) FOR SALE—'Troy-bilt rototillers, decount prices. For information call Hjckory Hill Nursery, 703-942-3871. GREAT APPLE BUTTER —at home in two hours. $2 for Ann's redpes. P. O. Box 419, Chilhowie, Va 24319. SALE —stacks, 1 1/2' x 1 1/2' x 42' or shorter, used for survey, construction. 703-968-6235, after 3 p.m. WANTED —old U.S. coins before 1940. Cash paid. Ask for Gene, 703-967-2338. FOR SALE —ladies left hand (Patty Berg) golf clubs, cart and bag. 804-246-8381. Virginia Farm VDACS Bureau Daily Cash Market line Prices GRAIN 1 -800-277-4832 GRAIN and LIVESTOCK LIVESTOCK 1-800-552-5521 1-800-277-8852 Available 4:30 p.m. to 8 a.m. Available 24 hours a day £1 Is your Income being (jaft squeezed too tight by Health Insurance /m^ Costs? CALL: 1 -800-229-7779 And find out about Group Health Plans for Small Businesses It's worth a FREE Phone Call! Don't delay call 1 -800-229-7779 or write: Virginia Farm Bureau Service Corp., Att: Health C...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

«SShßßp*** j * vt > xSL- H tST - *JRC*~"" '^Hr-'' 'W&Sk'' *<£ PfIHHHHi % * • ■PPSSPVIHPHI ■Fa V * fc K ft ' w m % ft % ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ -wii I ■ ■ H ■ I ■ ■ ■ 4 ■ w J P Vol 53, No. 5 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS June 19* PIM -s wf .3 JMFWm "flßl 3 • — treat yourself to an old-fashioned t lAa i, ice cream cone like 20-month-old Erin Coumes of Chesterfield ' f County did recently. America's * | H« dairy farmers remind the public during June Dairy Month that the «** calcium in milk and milk products is necessary for strong teeth and healthy bones. And, calcium helps 'Sf • •:• •„ \ % Hh||iH| prevent osteoporosis, the bone -.; " 4 ; disease which afflicts millions of Americans. Read about two modern dairy farmers on Page 8. KATHY DIXON/FBN ► A full range of life insurance programs ► Some of Virginia's most competitive ijT V auto & home insurance rates ► Complete farmowners protection 1, 4 | J ? 4 \ I ► A wide range of health insu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

rarm Bureau Vol 53, No. 6 VFBF breaks membership record again By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor GOOCHLAND—The state's largest farm organization marked a milestone recently when its membership readied an all-time high. On June 15, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation counted 112,073 members across the state—the largest membership total in its 69year history, and 2,659 more family memberships than at the end 0f1993. Less than haKwaythruugh this year, VFBF had already surpassed its membership quota And ty the end af1994, the total is expected to be at leastll3,ooo, said VFBF Membership Services Director Brad Loway. This is the fourth year in a row that the organization has broken its own membership record. The best part is that the number of producer (farmer) membere is grow- ingeven as farm numbers continue to decline," Lowery commented. Farm Bureau is a non-profit oiganization for farmers and rural families. Its membership is a rombination offamily members in 88 county Farm Burea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

2 Wildlife: Feed bills paid by farmers If you have a bird feeder in your yard, you probably have wondered where the expression that someone "eats like . a bird" ever originated Birds are not light eaters. The feed bill for these feathered friends can make you think twice about hauling sacks cfbirdseed heme. Perhaps you also have had rabbits nibble away at tender sprouts in your garden. Despite the costs and occasional irritation, most of us like having wildlife around. The same is true for farmers, only their experiences with wildlife are on a much larger scale because they control so much private land Their views about wildlife and wildlife damage are the subject of a study commissioned by the American Farm Bureau Federation Research Foundation, and conducted by Michael Conover of Utah State University. Conover found that more than half of the farmers and jAXtllska/^^^ VBl Iwfflt Smart operators balance increased costs with increased income Farm Bureau continually seeks ways to imp...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

July 1994 July 7: Animal Industry Day banquet, Virginia Tech. Featured speaker Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services J. Carlton Courter HI. Contact Charlie Stott, 703-231-5863. July 8: Animal Industry Day, Virginia Tech. Highlights of the latest livestock research in Virginia. Contact Charlie Stott, 703-231-5863. July 9-10: Professional Auction Services Quarter Horse Sale; Virginia Junior Quarter Horse Association Show, Fairgrounds on Strawberry Hill, Richmond Contact Sue Mullins, 804-228-3238. July 9:4-H FFA Performance carcass lamb show, Clarke County Fairgrounds. Contact Lance Kauf, Clarke County Extension agent, 703-955-1131. July 11-16:4-H Youth Conservation Camp, Virginia Tech. Contact Wayne Compton, 703-231-6371. i 1 July 12: Nursery/Landscape field day, Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Experiment Station, Virginia Beach. Contact Bonnie Appleton, Extension horticulturist, 804-363-3906. July 14-15: Virginia Pesticide Control Board, Va. Dept. of Agri...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

4 bumper am ■t"" ' i—*«fifrr--- 81 PPT $cnn pfIQU RAPII 9 as ancl Cummins diesel 1994 Ram UL I yUUU UMOm DMUiV regular cab pickups, we've also extended nn Mnnn ia/hdtu this cash t3ac ' < offer to se ' ect mid ~ size Un pIUUU VVUnin Dakota pickups. Along with all 1994 Ram AC nCU/AI T Tfifil Q Vans and Ram Wagons. And it's on top Ur UtWHLI IUULO. of any other national offer, too* Or, if you . ■ . prefer, select up to $1,000 in heavy-duty "TttSL'l America s farm economy DeWalt tools, instead. Either way, see mm/fSb- con ti nues to show signs of y our p arm g ureau f o r a certificate 4®fflr significant improvement. validating that you've been a member For the third year in a row, for at least thirty days. Then drop by Dodge Truck is proud to offer Farm y our Q o dge Dealer. And cash in. Bureau members a special purchase ...... . . *This cash back offer is valid for eligible members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires incentive. Which means you can pick . 12/31/94. and may...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

July 1994 Improve farm production with free agricultural reports EICHMONE)—'Ihe Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services offers a number of free agricultural reports, including the following: Virginia Agriculture Commodity Newsletter. A four-page weekly report summarizing livestock and grain price information. National and state prices and trends are published for slaughter and feeder cattle, hogs and sheep. Weekly prices are listed for goats, poultry, peanuts, tobacco and cotton. Virginia Fruit and Vegetable Market Information Newsletter A monthly publication in season that lists information on the major fruit and vegetable crops produced in Virginia. The newsletter emphasizes market and crop conditions in Virginia as well as in competing production areas. Virginia Fruit and Vegetable Bulletin: A twice weekly report in season that lists shipping points and terminal market prices, and shipments for major fruits and vegetables produced in Virginia. Virginia Retail Far...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

6 Llamas H J| | fun, useful, profitable t>\| Llama Association of the w I Llamas as sentries »■ ♦ ■ j> m, Alpacas and Llamas m Mid-Atlantic states pro duce w titer I _ / J\l .*» Don't miss these events Ov For more information J sponsored by L*A*M*A # 5... \/f about L*A*M # A*S ° T^ ° rec^ues *° ur Are held Llamas', write | '* H T i r Anyone with an K _S J LAMAS Library, \♦ &\ jSpfip* Llamas can pertorm , , • // / \ , r - r . ** r " interest in llamas or / LJept rB, \ y T alpacas is welcome. I 122 E. Main St, I (\Av j /or f/ie wex£ ft'wc --/ I , anJp/ace IL^/V S Alpacas ■ KW (7th Annual, Class "A" Show) There are a number of other llama September 25 & 20, IQQ4 events to be held n Virginia and its I Llamas can pull carts Virgina State Fair Grounds surrounding states in the next year. I T ..... Richmond, Virginia L-A-M-A-S members will be I J \ \ Contact: Dale Graham happy to let you know when they %Jf} jfc J (703) 937-4475 are and where th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

July 1994 Wheat forecast up RlCHMOND—Virginia's 1994 wheat crop is expected to total 14 million bushels—4 percent higher than last year's production. According to the first forecast of the season by the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service, wheat yields are expected to average 52 bushels per acre, down 1 bushel from 1993. The higher production is attributed to a 15,000-acre increase in harvested acreage, currently set at 270,000 acres. Virginia native receives federal association award RICHMOND—Kenneth Carter, resource conservationist for the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, • was honored for his "Outstanding Technical Accomplishment" by the Federal Executive Association of Central Virginia. Carter was given the award for his work in developing a coordinated, single conservation plan approach to help farmers protect natural resources and meet environmental regulations. Designing what's called the "one plan" has meant cooperation among federal, state and local government officials...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1994

8 State aquaculture industry growing in waves, survey reveals By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—AII indicators point to explosive growth for the aquaculture industry in Virginia. "We're just in the beginning of it now," said James Conway 111, president of the Virginia Fish Farmers Association Inc. "This is a good opportunity to get in at this level and grab some market-share and produce some fish." According to the first state aquaculture survey released in May, Virginia fish farmers had gross sales of more than $19 million last year. Aquaculture includes any operation in which fish, shellfish and other aquatic animals and plants are raised under controlled conditions. Most aquaculture industry growth in Virginia has occurred since 1985. One of the most outstanding statistics unveiled from the first survey ofVirginia's growing aquaculture industry is the importance of saltwater species. They accounted for $16.4 million of the $19 million sold by fish farmers last year. Cla...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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