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Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witne... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 15,303 items from Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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RANDOLPH'S UNIVERSITY. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

RANDOLPH'S UNIVERSITY. Cawmill Carrmichaers" proposition to establish a chair of journalism at Sydney University (writes Peter Persnurkus) recalls a tale of that ebul lient genius,. Randolph Bedford. The thing happened in the days when Bed ford still belonged to daily-press work. He went to a Sydney journal looking for a job—Bucephalus offering to pull an ice-waggon. This journal had a. sort of . fiction , that it lolted for Uni versity' men to write" its paragraphs about the Lord Mayor and the E»rum moyne drainage. It was only fiction, but it was cherished. To this august place came Randolph, to see the gen eral manager. "What can you do?" the potentate asked. "Paragraphs, stories, articles, re ports," said Randolph. "Ah!" said the employer, not ill pleased. "And can you write short hand?" The superstition of those days was that you might be Jonathan Swift and Rudyard Kipling and Hilaire Belloc rolled together, but if you couldn't write shorthand there was no place for you there. "...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN LOVE WITH A PICTURE. The Italian Who Stole "Monna Lisa" from the Louvre is not the First Man to Fall a Victim to the Charm of a Picture. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

IN LOVE WITH A PICTURE. The Italian Who Stole "Monna Lisa" frojri the Louvre is not the First Man to Fall a Victim to the Charm of a Picture. "I fell in love with 'Monna Lisa."' 'That was the declaration of Vincen zo Perugia, the man who stole the famous picture, made to the police. After he had taken it from the Louvre he said .that he went home, locked himself in his room, and stood en tranced before it, 'bewitched by the smile of La Gioconda. There were . times, he said, when - he felt that he must destroy the picture or he would go mad, so haunting was the smile. "Monna Lisa", has always had ad mirers. One of the Louvre guides at the time the picture was stolen, stated that he had seen visitors sit in front of it for hours, captivated by the se ductive' smile; and the museum au thorities often used to have letters addressed to "The original of "Monna Lisa'!" Far more people than Viucenza Per ugia have fallen madly in love with - well-known pictures. It was J^illais's picture "Op...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Intention Only Credited. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Intention Only Credited. ■ A fashionably-dressed young man strolled into a small Scottish church while service was being held. The time for the collection came round, and, wishing to draw attention to him self, he flung his penny (as he thought) down on the plate with a crash. Immediately after so doing he discovered, to his great dismay, he had given half-a-crown in mistake. He at once got up and followed the old sexton, and asked to be allowed to get back his money. The old man shook his head and said—"Na, na; I canna gie it back to ye. Ye gied it to the Lord." The young man argued for some time, and at last gave it up and ex claimed impatiently—"Well, I suppose I'll get credit for it in heaven." "Na, na," replied the old man, "ye'll only get credit for the penny." At a club meeting held in a public house in a small village a discussion took place as to whether a hard or soft substance would last the longer. The debate continued for some time, until one man spoke up and said:— "No...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LADIES' LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

LADIES' LETTER. ; I never rettember blouses that , are • calculated to go to the heart of every woman, who appreciates an elegance achieved by simple methods and with r.out any apparent effect than at the . present moment. -They are now such j a very important item of every kind' of costume that the choice is as varied as the numerous distinctly different -classes of designs, all worthy of se parate consideration. From the simple shirt to the com ■ ..plexity of the afternoon or demi-toil lette blouse of tulle is a far cry. Com mencing at the bottom of the ladder, -so" to say, with the simplV shirts, these in themselves provide food for ... deep reflection. It is the American women who look their best in the severest of tailor made shirts. I do not mean the wo ■■•=-• man whose figure is at its best nor the pretty creature who can carry off all kinds of fashionable follies and modish madnesses, but the natural, Jtomely American, who knows how to put on. her colthes. The plain untrimme...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Followed Advice. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Followed Advice. In a country neighborhood there was an old woman who kept a -small general shop, where she carried on a lucrative business. Unfortunately, she persisted for a long time in car rying on her trade on Sunday, much to the scandal and disgust of a cer tain parish visitor, who entertained strictly orthodox views as to the ob servance of the Sabbath. The latter remonstrated with the shopkeeper, and eventually, much, to the satisfaction of everybody con cerned, persuaded h.er to refrain from Sunday trading. A few days ago she met the old woman, who looked happy and prosperous. "I'm glad," said the parish visitor, "to see that you are doing so well. You have not lost anything by fol lowing my advice." "That's so, mum," was the reply; "tout you can't imagine how many of my customers come round the back way!"

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Worm Turned. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

The Worm Turned. I The other day Sir Gilbert Parker, I M.P., referring to Lord Rosebery's re mark that "most books in a library ought to be burned," told of a lively exchange of compliments Ihe once liad vith a publisher. Sir Gilbert had been pointing out that in many cases, owing to the in ability of literary men to look after themselves, publishers made far more money out of books than their authors did. The publisher remarked that what Lord Rosebery should have said was that, "It was not most books, but most authors who should be burned." "That may be- true," retorted Sir Gilbert, ''but judging from the pub lishers' share of the profits of the au thors' labors, most of the authors were too green to be burned!"

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fatal Honeymoon Trip. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Fatal Honeymoon Trip. Air Shannon and his wife were travelling on Thursday from Ter ang to W. rrnambool, and when going down a hill a mile from Ter ang the steering gear broke. The J car left the road and crashed through a fence, striking a stone culvert. It overturned, with Mr Shannon un derneath. He was killed outright. His wife was thrown clear and re ceived a severe shaking. Deceased was only married on Tuesday at St'Arnaud to Miss L. Blakely, of that place, and he was motoring with his. bride when the accident happened. He was cap tain of the Barwon Rowing Club, . . the members of which had made arrangements to entertain him.on his return from the honeymoon.trip.

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Experts in Conflict. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Experts in Conflict. A case in which the effect of con flicting States legislation was exem plified came before Albury police court. William Henry Kilbeck, inspec tor under the Pure Foods Act, pro ceeded against Chas. Reis for hav ing sold adulterated raspberry syrup cordial. The certificate of the analyst was that the sample was found to be deficient in raspberry juice to the extent of at least 50 per cent, and was artificially colored. For the defence it was showu that the cordials 'were made in Mel bourne; that they complied with the Victorian law, and contained 20 per cent of pure raspberry juice. Alfred Henry Jackson, public analyst in Victoria, said he had analysed a sample of the cordial in question, which contained 20 per cent, of raspberry juice. It was not colored by any artificial matter. If the New South Wales Government Analyst said the sample was defici ent iu raspberry juice to the extent of 50 per cent, it was incorrect. To say that the syrup was artificially colored...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

For Children's Hacking Cough atjtfight, Woods'Great Peppermint Cure, 1/6. The Canadian Senate has under consideration a bill introduced by Senator Davis, which has for its object the .abolition of the practice of " tipping." Tha P.M. and local justices at Port Melbourne vyere the other day called upon to act as sponsors for an abandoned and unclaimed infant found over a month ago on a sea t in the ladies' waiting room at Port Melbourne railway station. The in fant had been committed to the care of the Sutherland Home. At the suggestion of the nurse, who brought the child before ths magistrate, the infant was given the name of Ethel Rose; Huntington, one of the presi ding justices remarking, " And may she live long and prosper;1' The Stawell "News" struck trouble recently, and gaVe its readers a dark-blue hint that it knew the exact nature of the mis hap. Witness this :—" No 'Copy.' —Owing to our reporter getting Most1 last night, and failing to ap pear before we went to press this m...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Managing the Boy. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

- Managing the Boy. Children-are easily diverted from their purposes by kind dealing, while severe treatment has the oppo site' effect. When your play-loving boy asks to go out after supper, and you don't • think it best, ^for any. reason, that he should, du not snap .out,-^>5SIo,.;you can't! The place for' 15oys is in the house at night." If the lad has any of the old. Adam " in him, he will either sulk, or rebel or manage to make himself and everybody near him uncomfortable until bedtime. You can rule him, • qf -course; by force ; but it is' nt a victory to be proud of. How much betteiTC'OrTma'ke him -prefer to stay in—or at least to reconcile him to it " Propose a game with him, tak ing a hand in'it yourself; or read to him out of a • book a little beyond his range of reading, but quite with in his line of thinking ; anything to give the. boy a pleasant time and make him forget his disappointment. No time is better expended^ in fami ly government, thau in helping the children ...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
On being "Tired." [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

: 'J; On being "Tired." " . Everybody sooner or later, and generally sooner than later, gets tired of the humdrum life most people.have to lead. This is espe cially the case with women. From girlhood to courtship is a bright dream, as studded with hopes as a'J uly night is with stars. All is rosy; the future looks as fairylike as a glimpse into Queen Tenia's woodland boudoir. . Then, married ,or single, comes the rude touchiOf-reSalitjr,':.A$ • the worljd is ,.nojt, ,awhat ^it^ w^as at seventeen ; at five-and twenty it is a dreadfully sober reality ; at thirty, it is a perplexing puzzle, with which " we're tired, my heart and T " ' .. Brit the- verses from which " this quotatioh is taken- are' -too patheti cally perfect a summing-up of this kind; of weariness, to be passed over without a longer excerpt You see we're tired, my heart and 1; i We dealt with books, we trusted men, v i And in our own blood drenched the den, As if such colours could not fly. ; We -walked <too s...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

• " You wicked people ; you wicked Australians !" cried Professor Mudd at the Kyneton Methodist Church recently, " How dare you waste your timber so ! No, don't laugh; this is no. laughing matter ; it is downright serious—no trees, uo rain is nature's law. Iu all serious ness and impressiveuess I say to you, ' If you dou'.t soon put a stop to the wicked_ -destruction :'of the* forests on the slopes of your moun tains the next, generation will curse your'names. ' ''' SOROSES SKIN FOOD. ' "Every woman who wishes to appear beautiful should use "SOROSES" ' tor tie skin, it being unsurpassed in preserv ing the complexion. Soroses Skin Food s Freshening, Softening, Cleansing, and BdiMtif ying, makosiall- f blemishes ' such vas> Piaiplee, Freckles, Wrinkles, Sunburn and Sailowness disappear like magie. Price 2/6 per jar. Obtainable at Miss E. Cs**ellf s, Myrtleford'.

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Three Weeks to London. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Three Weeks to London. A bill of importance to the Com monwealth is at present under the consideration of the, railway com mittee of the Canadian House of Commons. It.provides foi the con struction of a line from Cape St. Charles, on the south east coast of Labrador, to a point on the coast of British Columbia, and its import ance to Australia lies in the fact that, if approved, it will be possible, by means of express trains connect ing with vessels on the Atlantic and Pacific, to travel between England and the Commonwealth iu three weeks. The scheme has been taken jup by a ' powerful syndicate, in which British and Canadian capital ists are interested.

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Spread of Diphtheria. A PECULIAR EXPLANATION. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Spread of Diphtheria. a Peculiar Explanation. In a report to Coburg Council, the health officer, Dr Dyring, said— 104 cases of diphtheria were re ported, resulting in four deaths, or at the rate of a little over 4 per cent. Diphtheria seemed *to be the disease^ with which they would have to deal vigorously. Its origin was un known, but iti spread undoubtedly occurred among school children. A sore throat, apparently innocent in character, might contain diphtheria germs. A child might feel ill and complain to the parents, but the fear of the truant ,officer turned the scale, resulting' in the child being sent to school, and becoming a source of infection. A less rigid enforcement of the truancy clauses ' would tend greatly to prevent the spread of diphtheria. j

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Council Officers Dismissed. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Council Officers Dismissed. At the last meeting of Violet Town council a motion giving all the offi cers a month's notice of the termi nation of their agreements, with a view to readjusting the offices, was carried by one vote after a stormy discussion. The trouble arose over' the engineer, Mr H. Crowther, who was receiving ,£350 a year, with the right of private practice, having taken on the engineership of Bright shire as well, at a salary of ,£230. Councillors argued that . he could not satisfactorily carry on both. It was decided to call applications for a resident engineer, secretary, rate collector and valuer at ,£300 per year and 2 ]/z per cent on grant money expended, with the right to private practices.

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Varieties. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Varieties. Business makes a mamas y/jell as , tries Him.». . . . , If tnen do us 'an evil. turn, we write. it. in marble ; if a good one, / in dust,. :• . > ....; ' Physic, for the most part, is but a substitute for exercise • or temper ance. ■ TheW is a; £e¥man- proverb which says that: " Take-it-easyand'y 4 'Xive' Jong"'' afe brothers. ; A y'cheerful, .beart. "is. ^more !.^to^ be,, valued than all the riches , of the., world without cheerfulness. Happiness is perfume. that: one cannot shed over others without a few drops falling on one's self.. When a man speaks the truth you may count pretty surely that. he., possesses most other virtues. The object of all ambition should ^ 'be to be happy at home.'' If we are not happy there, we cannot be happy elsewhere. 1 ■ '/olf ; • ' -- ' ' _.f f .. Nature fhas- neither language nor discoursebut she. creates .tongues and hearts, by'which she feels aud ... speaks. . ■ . ; .'' ■ *■■■■■ ■ ■ . Whatever you win in life you , must conquer b'y y...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Oi ! liealtli.is wealth, and life is long, Ancl earth is fairer, too ; When man is fit and well Tiie skies are always blue, 80 guard your health, your joy iiicrease, Your life from ills secure; .From pain and trouble win surcease With Woods' Great Peppermint Cure.

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Slavery in Papua. A GRAVE SCANDAL. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Slavery in Papua. A Grave Scandal. The Australian public generally will be surprised to hear that last year a system of ilegally indentur ing natives; was allowed to flourish iu a part of the north-eastern por tion of Papua, with the active co operation of a Government-official. Aotion was taken by . the Depart ment, for Native Affairs in .. the Papuan Administration. A detailed investigation took place, and, as a : result, , the official has been dis missed. Altogether close upon 1000 of the indentures signed by natives from this division for three years' work have been examined by • the department, and the allegation is that in nearly 500 cases the men signed, or rather marked, them against their will. The men were forced to do so by threats of the cruellest and most callous character. In several instances the . recruiters actually obtained the use of. Gov ernment native police to; intimidate the native " boys." •:. ■ P'athetic stories are told by many of tne indentured laborers o...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Danger of Invasion. AUSTRALIA MUST BE PREPARED. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

Danger of Invasion. Australia Must be Prepared. General Hamtlton, speaking at a civic welcome at 'Auckland, N.Z., said the questionable.had been asked .on his tour was wby, when we were expecting the millenium, were flourishing countries like Australia and New Zealand making such ex traordinary preparations^ for-- war. Because of the shortening in dis tance by the advent of electricity, aeroplanes, fast steamers and high explosives during the last hundred years '"great natious had arisen in the Pacific. Other nations, were showing: marvellous energy. Des pite its charming name, the Pacific • was even a more stormy centre than some less distinguished parts of the; globe. It was conceivable that in ■future there would be greater and more terrible convulsions than in the past. The Pacific was the meeting ground not of nations but of continents, and there .it might be decided whether-Asiatics> or Euro peans were going to guide the des tines of this planet. These were obvious reasons,...

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Railway Gauge Problem. THIRD RAIL INVENTION. [Newspaper Article] — Myrtleford Mail and Whorouly Witness — 21 May 1914

". \ ■ * :: ~ ' ~ Railway Gauge Problem. Thikd'Rail Invkntion. | The N.S.W. Premier is in com munication with the Railway Com missioners and the Premier of Vic toria for a trial of the Brenuan switches at Toctitnwal border rail way. Mr Brennan's invention is a device for applying a third rail sys tem to solve the break of gauge be tween Sydney and Melbourne. It has been represented by Mr'Holrhan that if this were done trains could be ruii right through from Sydney to Melbourne and vica versa, there by effecting a saving of time and money. It is claimed for the inven tion that it solves the difficult ques tion of working railway points with . three,.r^ails..- The device amounts to , ;a switching of "rails to make clear, roads for two different wheel gauges. V, Mr H,. M...Deane, formerly chief engineer for railway construction in New,: South " Wales, reported very:", •favorably on the invention, but Air T. R. Johnson, ex-Chief Commis sioner, turned it dowu.

Publication Title: Myrtleford Mail And Whorouly Witness
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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