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Elephind.com contains 44,014 items from American Presbyterian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

m_^m THE RECENT CAPTUBE OF THE _FEEBTCH SLAYER. Thrilling Account.—- As the u. b. steamer Crusader was cruising in the old Bahama Channel, not far from Vuevitas, on the 23d of May, a square-rigged vessel of moderate size was reported from aloft. We immediately stood for her, as. no sail is _^llow ' ett to pass us in these slaver-haunted waters, or_^ven to come in sight, without having her character ascertained. As soon as she found herself an object of pursuit; the strange sail began toi behave in such a man ner as stronglv excited pur suspicions, and at length fairly put her helm up and run in for the shore, thus taking the _lafet and most desperate chances of escape. Unfortunately for her the wind was so light that sfle was prevented from effecting her purpose, ant we rapidly overhauled her, notwithstanding tha t she was carrying all her canvass. The Crusader now hoisted English colors and fired a gun to windward, when, after some delay, the barque (for * _snch she pro...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

EKE _fOBGOTTEH fEOMISE. _« No, no—don't ask me for anything, woman —I' m pestered to _deaih! no—I tell you, no!" These words I repeated harshly, unkindly, because the woman lingered. I can see her now—• the thin dheeks, the eyes almost wild with their longing looks—the jarteti lips, the pallor of disease. Yes, I see her standing there By the door, in the _position of one who felt she must, hut dreaded to ask a favor—one foot forward—-one hand extended toward the latch—the scalnt shawl falling eloseiy over the clinging dress—alas, poor soul! She turned wearily—her eyelids fell—her lip quivered, and all over her jc^^;..:_th_^i/']i_^ie_^s_} utterly disheartened manner, thai wraps one sometimes like a cloud. I turned to my desk as the door was shujt to, and took up _iny ledger again. Ho use_^t_$i;uble 'with the first column, the second, the third-rover and over I went, unweariedly—I had better have been " jpe|iding tlietime listening _J_» $6 _itpry of the poor woman. For there she...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

HOW TO BENDER FAMILY W0B.SHIP PLEASANT AND Pfi,0FITA3L|:. We could hardly have a more important subject before us, reader, short of personal salvation. Does yours belong to the families that call not on the name of the Lord? Then seek at once to draw your hoTfse into covenant with him. Are you a member of the Church? Remember that one of your first duties is to show piety at home. The nsefulnffna and hpfm+y nf family wnrahip is acknowledged by_'all, but the trouble is in making that duty pleasant and profitable. Now here are some plain and ea3y directions. Consider them if you are the head of a family; and if family devotions have heretofore been languid and irksome to the household, you may enliven them. Christian parents are sometimes discouraged from constancy around the family altar, because their children manifest so little interest in the services. Why should this be? What is in itself more appropriate and interesting for a family, than the united worship of the Great Gi...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

_^fxivifg §iuU. THE VAUD0I8 TEACHER. "The manner in-which the Waldenses and heretics disseminated their principles among the Catholic gentry, was by carrying with them a box of trinkets, or articles of dress. Having entered the houses of the gentry, and disposed of their goods, they cautiously intimated that they had something far more valuable than these—inestimable jewels, which they would show if they could _T_>e protected from the clergy. They would then give their purchasers a Bible or Testament; and thereby many were deluded into heresy."—&. Scceho. "0, lady fair, these silks of mine are beautiful and rare—The riohest web of the Indian loom, which beauty_^a queen might wear; And my pearls are pure as thy own fair neck, with whose radiant light tJxey vie; I have brought them with me a weary way: will my gentle lady buy?" And the lady smiled on the worn old man through the dark and clustering curls Which vdWd her brow as she bent to view his silks and glitte...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

ACADEMY OJ1 NATURAL _SCIENCES. At a late meeting Dr. Leidy presented some specimens of the seventeen year locust (cicada septendecini), collected b_/him in New Jersey, and described the manner in which the band was marked. Along \ certain,liqe they were found in numbers on one side, while, noue were.to be found on the other. An interesting- discussion on the character and extent of these bands, and the, manner in which-the_/ilmetimes overlap each other, was, held between JD§_& Leidy, Mr. Powell, Rev. Mr. !ft|prri& of- B, _altijnpre, Mr. Cassin, Mr. Binney, Dr. Fisher and others. The habits of the insect and, its pepuliariti_^s were described at length. Mr. * Binney stated that it, made its appearance at Mount Holly, in New Jersey, on the 27th of May, being , exactly_^seventeen years after its last appearance there. It,was also stated that where the bands, overlapped, the appearance of the insect would be at _intemk.Qf eight and nine ye.ars , ~ w _. hich would _...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

RUINS OF B0MAN LONDON Jn digging the foundation of St. Martin's Church at Ludgate, in digging for Goldsmith's Hall, in digging for the new Royal, Exchange, wherever the digging may be within Roman bounds, when it is deep enough _^ discoveries are made. Under the Royal Exchange there was found what_^ proved to be, a gravel-pit which had been used as a common dust-hole by the Roman citizens. When the Excise office was pulled down, six years ago, between Bishopsgate-street and Broad street, a beautiful mosaic pavement was discovered; Europa, in the middle of it had been sitting under ground for at least sixteen centuries upon her bull. In the same neighborhood, a drain sunk in a cellar disclosed-part of another pavement that may have belonged to another room-in the same villa. _^ Ip preparing the site, for the Hall of Commerce in Threadneedle street more pavements were found of Koman_, planning, under mediaeval fragments of the walls of the old hospital of St. Anthony. Between that p...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

"HE C_^IH_$f 3| LOOK _jp |^ THE EYE^' i'-I-'don't- want your boy, sir," said aii eccentric merchant to a father who i_^aB seeking _sm_^_ioyjiiept, for his _s_^n.: _5(_pe _li«(ng his fteaatalfi_^ time i was talking to him; and I never want to do busi_* ness with any body whjo cafi*t _Jool _f n_^f_^rn _$hfcgjfi "t Children, if you stan_^ be_^_ile a singing brook when the sun shines upon it, how. clearly you. _caii see the pure little, pebbles, and the silver saqclon the bottom; eyer_^- ripple oif the wai_^ij- " _lppks like a, atring of diamonds, and all around is made g lad by; itS' ffefibnes|_, and purity; ' Sut go to |lie frog p_^^'X'fip^" t^^.; look x_$_to,_$ie ' son's ' eye; ana reflect his rays like the dancing waters of the little brook? Oh, no. The dull, green veil it wears is itself a part of the pollution it hides below.. Let your_^ear,t be_^ pure _^ _likj; the wateii o£ tlie brooks then, you will have nothing to hide, and may look parent,-teacher, or employer; steight' JnJ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

ALUMINUM. ¦ ' The ore of this valuable metal is scattered, in millions of tons through all _sections of tl_^e qpuntry, being more abundant and more accessible than any other metal. All granite rocks and all beds of clay are_'partly composed of it. iPure clay, or alumina, is simply the sesquioxyd of aluminum (A12 03,) containing 24 lbs. of oxygen to 27 lbs. of the metal, and all that is necessary to give us unlimited supplies of this precious substance is a cheap mode of separating it from the oxygen. So rapid have been the improvements in the method of effecting -this separation, that .within about four years, the price of aluminum has been reduced from §250 to less than §9 per pound. If the price should be reduced sufficiently, this metal is destined to play a great part in the industrial arts, for by its lightness, strength, and incorruptibility in the air, it is admirably adapted to many uses. Even at the present priceit will no doubt replace silver to a considerable extent...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

A mm OE _THAJTE& ff lfeel so ' yejtecland out of _temper _^ith_,Ben!" cried _' Mark, "iHat I really _musfe_^ **Do something in revenge?" inquired his cousin Cecilift_^ : : ; ; "''" '" .. ' ' ' ¦M'<"_-' ': '" ¦ " _'¦ _^KoJbok over my Book of Thanks.'?. ¦wWha_^_sJthat _^ _said: Cecilte, arshVsaw him , _turning over _^e , leajVes . of a _cbpyrb_^_ok niMly_^_fjft lt, of writing, in,a._rqundi text hand; " Here it is," said Mark, then read aloud: _^Marett 3. Ben lent me his new hat/" _' "" ' " Here again: * Jan. 4. When I''last iny shilling, B_^n mlade _ftf up ip me .kindly?*' ¦ °V| f> 7'* ' V " _WeU | " Qb f|§ ry. ed ._thit _^oy4 turning dpwn the leaf, _^'|Ben is a good boy after all I" ;• ¦ '? _Whai do youTnote down in thai book?" said Cecilia, looking over his shoulder with some curiosity. " All, the kindnesses that, _are _^ eyer shown me.. Tou; would wonder how many there are. _t find, a great deal of good from marking them_^ down. VU itbtfo_^ttitteni , aftl;ta...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 21 June 1860

A FLORAL CURIOSITY. To obtain flowers of different colors on the same stem (or apparently so,) split a small branch of elder lengthwise, and having scraped, out ihe pith, put into each part some good soil, mixing with it several seeds of different plants, but which bloom at the same time. Then tie the split pieces together, and set them out in a pot or. box filled with mould. The seeds will soon germinate, and the plants grow up together with their stems and branches and leaves so intermingled, that to the common observer they will appear to grow from the same root.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

LETTEE PROM CHINA _FELICITOUS WORDS AND SENTENCES USED BY. THE CHINESE* The Chinese language, whether spoken or Written, _abounds in words add set phrases, which are considered as felioitons and ominous of good. The use of such is very common) especially on _bocaaions joyous and complimentary. I propose in tbis letter to illustrate: this peculiar trait of Chinese character, _by a reference to several of their words and _stereotyped sentences. ' - The Chinese unieoro_^ (kiting}): is in popular use, an omen of good. This fabulous animal is described as; having only one houn _^ with a body all covered with; _soalea. For several thousand years it has- eluded the vision of mortals) excepting oncfytfhon; ito is stated to naive be_^n seen by Oonfttdiua in hjb old age. He is said to have regardedtitraa; ominous of his approaching death. TAg_^ w_^> that Confucius _wad the elf of the •ttnieorttki Hence perhaps th&originrof the common _(_te_^ing_^ that an extraordinarily b...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

THE B. AUD O. E. _^V EDIT: _ORJAL EXCTTRs_^ m. , . , Memphis, June 1st, 1860. Dear Editors:—I*|adlong heard that this was a " great place, _andtfdestined to be on,e of the largest of our western cities:" but I had so often heard the very same thitfg of so many places,,that I was nearly taken aback with the handsome appearance, busy aspect,,ip!fd rstpid- growth of Memphis_^ The _location_*pf the city is very prepossess ing. Upon a'hi gh blttiF, fully one hundred feet above the river, upSn_^ the convex side of a majes_^ tic curve in the streamJns _buildings are crowded solidly for two milesr 4M density of the built up portion _becoming less and less as you recede from the river, until the cisy- seems to melt imperceptibly into the _sutroiinding country. The main street has very much the appearance of some parts of our _Chestnut street, being built up with fine rows of [stores" for many squares. They are _^ quite large, ?Jld the display is so rich and varied, one almost _prinks he ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

CHAUCER. Chaucer, frequently called' the' "Father of _EnglisfT Poetry,">was born in London, in the year 1328. His parents were respectable and _prosperous, and' were enabled to give him a _classical education. He commenced writing poetry at the age of seventeen, j&is " muse soon gained him many friends, among whom was John of Gaunt, afterwards Doke of Lancaster, who remained his true friend for life. With the Dnke, he went to France on a military expedition, which gave him an opportunity of gaining that knowledge which was invaluable to him as a poet. _, After he returned from France, he obtained a lucrative situation as Officer of the customs. For a nnmber of years he abode under the smiles of the court, caressed by the King and his consort, flattered by the public, living, if not in luxury in great comfort, and with sufficient means for exercising a generous hospitality. In the reign of Richard II., how ever, m consequence ot an attachment to the doctrines of Wi...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

GOD'S _WOBTDERFTJL WOEK IN ITALY. The ldugdom of Sardinia now embraces nearly twelve millions of people, who in a most remarkable manner have become accessible to the gospel —seven millions of them within the last few months. Well may we exclaim, "Lo, what hath God wrought!" - This new kingdom of Italy is remarkable'for its large and interesting cities, each of them the scat of a university, and containing a large number of literary and scientific men. Five of these cities, Florence, GenoaMilan, Turin, and Bologna , must exert great influence by means of the press , while Genoa and Leghorn will possess immense commerci 'a?"advantages. The people of this new kingdom are better educated than the rest of Italy, and if their freedom shall be continued, who can estimate the intellectual activity that shall prevail, and the power of an unfettered press among them '( We can form some estimate of what this impulse is likely to be, when wo consider what Turin has done since 1848. ' During ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

THE DUTY OF THE _CHRISTIAN CITIZEN We have entered upon another political campaign. The questions involved are exciting, and the interests at stake inconceivably valuable. We would' cot, if we could, disparage the importance of the great questions upon which thirty millions of freemen are called upon to express an opinion, and to render a judgment. We are not among those who withdraw from the arena of civil duties and responsibilities. Freedom, if worth possessing is worth defending, and extending to others; and he is a sorry Christian who cannot preserve his peace of mind and his garments unspotted, without neglecting his civil duties. We hold thajb a Christian ought to be well acquainted _wiiJi the political issues be/ore the country. Ignorance is the stronghold of despotism; and an ignorant people cannot long preserve their liberties. If , therefore, reli gion were unfriendly to political inquiry, it would be inimical to the best interests of the country. It is the duty of a Ch...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

RELIGION IK JASAS It would appear from the number and .variety of religious sects in Japan, that the government does not actively interfere with liberty of conscience, nor sustain any system which properly can" be termeda State or organized ecclesiasticism. It is true _thaCyhere is nominally a distinct ecclesiastical power, and the-Mikado, or spiritual Emperor, is believed ' to-be inspired and of heavenly descent. But while he receives' all :tbe outward manifestations of respect, and even of religious reverence, his temporal power has been substantially transferred, to the Tycoon, or actual sovereign, and he himself has become the mere shadow of an Emperor, or the-representative of a traditionary or obsolete system,- which has yielded to the more modern and__ military policy of the nation. Indeed, it may be said that the Mikado is a kind of Pope without a See, and that he enjoys a general homage and a certain spiritual rank, but not the least authority to interfere in the temp...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

EXCELLENT ADVICE. The following extract is from a recent address by, Valentine Mott, M. D., LL. D., before the graduates of the University Medical College,, of New York. The sentiments are admirable, and are worthy a place in letters of gold in the qffice of every physician: - • . "With theministera of religion, of whatever denomination, you will always, I hope, maintain, the most amicable relations. They are generally men of education and refinement, with whom you may easily afi&liate. Though it will be yours to deal chiefly with the issues of temporal life, you must remember that there are also maladies of the soul. You must not allow too much contemplation of secondary causes to lead you to forget the great First Cause, and insensibly develop in you the philosophy of materialism. At the bed-side of a dying patient, it will be your, duty to study the symptoms of approaching dissolution—the fades Hippo* erotica — the subsultus — the muscce volitantes —with your fingers on...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

ON THE KNEES. An aged Christian woman once wrote to her sister: " Such is my debility and languor, that when I kneel down to pray, I am presently overpowered with drowsiness—so that I am like one talking in my sleep. I am sometimes assisted to pray best in my chair; but it is a heavy burden not to be able to pray on my Jcnees." Well might she deem that inability a heavy burden. Kneeling is the natural posture of prayer. The spirit of " humility, contrition and subjection," prompts it directly and irresistibly. We are perplexed to understand how private devotion can be sincere and fervent,_jvhere this prompting is not felt. "Under certain circumstances ," says Origen, "in cases of sickness, people may pray sitting or lying." He knew nothing else which could excuse the failure to offer the prayers of the closet " on the knees." Nor do we. -The posture of prayer re-acts on the spirit of prayer. The spirit is checked, where the befitting posture is refused. ,We doubt not that many Chr...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

MAN AND HIS SAVIOUR. ¦ A very old German author discourses thus ten - derly of Christ: " My soul is like a hungry and a thirsty child, and I need his love and consolations for my refreshment; I am a wandering and lost sheep, and I need him as a good and faithful Shepherd; my soul is like a frightened dove, pursued by a hawk, and I need iis wounds for a refuge; I am a feeble vine, and I need his cross to lay hold of and wind myself about it; I am a sinner, and I need his righteousness; I am naked and bare, and need'his holiness and innocence for a covering; I am in trouble and alarm, and I need his solace ; I am ignorant, and I need his teaching; simple and foolish, and I need the guidance of his Holy Spirit. "In no situation, and at no time, can I do without him. Do I pray? he must prompt and intercede for me. Am I arraigned by 'Satan at the divine tribunal? he must be my Advocate. Am I in affliction? he must be my helper. Am I per secuted by the world ? he must defend me. When ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 28 June 1860

TH1TIME FOR PRAYER . Whenis the time for prayer? With the first beams that light the morning sky, Ire for the toils of day thou dost prepare, Lift up thy thoughts on high; Commend thy loved ones to his watchful care! Morn is the time for prayer I And fn the noon_«tid« hour, If worn by toll or if Bad cares*, _oppress,; Then unto God. thy spirit 's sorrow pour, And he will give,thee rest; Tl>y voice shall reach him through the fields of air; Noon Is the1 time for- prayer I When the bright inn hath set—While eve1 * _fright colors deck the skies; When with the loved at home, a g ain thou'Bt met, Then let thy prayer artee For those who in thy joys and, sorrows share; Eve Is the time for prayer t And when the stats ootne forth—Whoa to. the trusting heart sweat hopes are.glven, And the deep stillness of the hoar gives birth Topure, bright dreams of heaven-Kneel to thy God—-fjlffc strength life's _iHaf to bear; Night is the time _fot prayer _f ~ When % the time for prayer?...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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