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Page 6 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS. Arnold, Constable Cos. HAVE NOW OPEN THEIR FALL STOCK OF NOVELTIES IA NECK DRESSINGS, HOSIERY, AND UNDERWEAR, LONDON STYLES, SUITINGS, TROWSERINGS, and OVERCOATINGS, FINE DRESS SHIRTS, COLLARS AND CUFFS, Muslin, Canton Flannel, and Flannel Night Shirts, BUCKSKIN UNDERWEAR, PAJAMAS, GLOVES, Silk and Linen Pocket Handkerchiefs, Robes de Chambre, Bath Robes, Smoking and Study Jackets, Silk and Woolen Mufflers, Umbrellas, &c., &c. Broadway, Corner igth Street. Liverpool and London and Globe INSURANCE COMPANY, OFFICE, No. 45 WILLIAM STREET. SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT Showing Condition of United States Branch Ist July, 1879. ASSETS. Real Estate. ss3°, 7°o °° Loans on Bonds and Mortgages 1,138,500 00 United States Bonds 1,720,700 00 State and Municipal Bonds. . - 95.625 00 Cash in Banks 406,264 70 Premiums in course of collection 308,841 75 Other Securities 100,470 83 Total $4,301,102 28 LIABILITIES. Unearned Premiums. $1,691,01999 Unadjuste...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Page 6 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

Kidd Manufacturing Cos 107 West 23d Street, COR. SIXTH AVENUE, NEW YORK. MANUFACTURERS OF Athletic, Rowing and Gymnasium Outfits, ALSO Fine Dress Shirts, per doz. - - $24.00 & 30.00 Flannel and Cloth Traveling Shirts, - each $2.50 to 3.50 Yacht or Barge Shirts, " $2.50 to 3.50 Bicycle, Base Ball and Cricket Suits. Swimming and Bathing Suits. Under the Management of CHAS. IVKIDD. c a _ 1 a 1 1 mi New York Homoeopathic MEDICAL COLLEGE. OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL BUILDING. Cor. 3rd Avenue & 23d St., New York. For information and announcements, Address. J. W. DOWLING. M. D., DEAN, 313 MADISON AVE.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Current Topics. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

Current Topics. TE shall endeavor to send THE SPECTATOR to all our subscribers, but those who have failed to hand in their names must not be surprised if they do not get their papers. We shall mail all copies to the catalogue address of subscribers, unless given other notice. examinations are over, and the midnight oil is no longer being consumed to any great extent. The senior is patting himself on the back, and congratulating himself that he is at length through with his four years, and is looking forward to his sheepskin with longing eyes. The junior feels his dignity, and, as he thinks of the freshmen busy with their entrance papers, remembers how, long ago, he was in their place. The sophomore is still talking of the Burial, and confidently assures every one that it was the best ever held, a remark which the upper classmen are too dignified to resent, and the freshmen not sufficiently learned to contradict. The freshmen are now in all the blushing dig- nity of hat and cane, and...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
To Eighty-Four. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

To Eighty-Four. COME! fill the beaker high, And drain the beaker low; Sing, smile, but do not sigh Though Eighty now must go. Old Eighty's had her day— A pleasant day, I trust — So " carpe diem " say, And drink the flowing must. Too short is life for sighs, Let us then sigh no more; Wail Eighty, as she dies, But greet new Eighty-Four, Come! drink the cup so red, Which, whilst in grape, was green; Green grapes are fresh 'tis said, (Like Eighty-Four, I ween.) But grape hides wine, you see, So fresh, doth senior veil. Eighty, we drink to thee, And Eighty-Four—wassail. —Febeheg,

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A Day of My Life at Columbia. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

A Day of My Life at Columbia. a r J WME to get up, Mr. Barton. Half-past eight, sir!" That's the servant who calls me every morning. I am usually in bad humor at that time, and, as a rule, throw various articles at him till he leaves off calling me, and goes out to brush my clothes. The exertion wakes me up thoroughly. This morning, reaching half way out of bed for my slipper —my commonest missile —I tumble out the rest of the way, and find myself up. I sit on the side of the bed and collect my thoughts. I believe it is Wednesday. Yes, it is Wednesday; because I remember yesterday was Tuesday. What do we have to-day ? Suddenly I remember I haven't done any of my work. Never mind, I'll begin now. Greek, while I'm dressing, have a look at the Trigonometry at breakfast, and get Brailey to read the Latin before College. Brailey always knows everything; that is, everything that's given out to him to learn. Well, I may as well begin to dress. Hello! there's the Columbiad I brought home ye...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Passaic Regatta. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

The Passaic Regatta. Decoration Day the Passaic Association held its annual regatta at Newark, and the events were well contested all round; the fouroared shell race being the only one in which we were interested. Our crew had entered in hope of meeting the Princeton crew, against whom they row at Philadelphia on the 28th, but in this they were disappointed, as their only contestants were the Nolan and Albany crews, the first consisting of R. J. Wilson, bow; F. Mitoh, No. 2; P. R. Gorman, No. 3; and Thomas Sheehey, stroke; and the latter of M. Monahan, bow; J. W. Monahan, No. 2; R. T. Gorman, No. 3; and J. J. Gorman, stroke. The Nolan club is an off-shoot of the old Olympics of Albany, and their friends were very confident of victory. Our boat got a good deal the worst of the start, but Printer hit her up at once, and at the quarter mile we had a lead of a length on the Nolans. At the half mile our boat had gained a length, and the Nolans had fallen back to third place. When the mil...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Vacation. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

Vacation. ONCE more the voices of land and sea Call us to come without delaying; Once more we wander with spirits free, Voices we love in haste obeying. To outer regions of life we go, Led by the sunlight richly streaming, Where welcome breezes of summer blow, Out to our sports and harmless dreaming. The work of winter is at an end, Not the resolves and thoughts we cherish; And mid the parting of friend from friend Old recollections shall not perish. As college walls in the distance fade, Deepens the glow of expectation; A shout as from one loud voice is made: " Ho, for a long and glad vacation !"

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Fifth Field Meeting of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

The Fifth Field Meeting of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Saturday, May 29th, the 12.30 train from the city was comfortably filled with collegians and young ladies, who were going to Mott Haven to secure good seats for the Intercollegiate. The 1.30 train brought large reinforcements of the fair sex, and numerous competitors, who were distinguishable by their small satchels, so that, when the trial heats of the 100 yards dash were started, the grand stand looked like a brilliant parterre of flowers, while the other stand and the quarter-stretch were quite crowded. The day was all that could be wished for outdoor spots, and the track was in excellent condition. At two o'clock promptly, the trial heats of the 100 YARDS DASH were run off. The first heat was a walk-over for A. T. Moore, Stevens. Five competitors started in the second heat, which was won by E. J. Wendell, Harvard, in 10 2-5 sec., E. W. Brown, Columbia, coming in second. In the ONE MILE WALK, three men started: ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A NEW LIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

A NEW LIGHT.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Burial. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

The Burial. AA/"EDNESDAY, May 26th, was one of the days when a person wanted to follow Sidney Smith's advice, and take off his skin and sit in his bones, but the heat had no effect on the enthusiastic members of 'B2 who assembled at the Worth Monument to take part in the obsequies of the Anglo-Saxon fiend. At a quarter of eleven, Neyer's band struck up, and the procession started up Fifth Avenue for the College. First came the police to clear a passage through the densely thronged streets (the streets are not generally overwhelmingly full at that time of night, but it sounds well), next the Grand Marshall, Robert Arrowsmith; followed by the Deadly Orator, James B. Nies; Solemnious Poet, W. K. Otis; and Grave Digger, Edw. R. Greene, all clad in gorgeous black gowns, adorned with skull and cross-bones. Next in order came a bier, on which lay a huge Anglo-Saxon Reader, supported by four pall bearers who comported themselves with becoming dignity. The Class Banner also occupied a conspi...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Philolexian. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

Philolexian. A SPECIAL meeting of the Philolexian Society was held at their rooms on Thursday, the 27th inst., for the purpose of electing officers for the ensuing year. In the absence of the other officers, Mr. Mills, the Librarian, presided. After the report of the Treasurer, Mr. Harvey, had been read and accepted, Mr. J. D. Livingston, 'BO, was nominated for President. There being 110 other candidate in the field, the Secretary was empowered to cast one ballot for Mr. Livingston, who was then declared elected. Mr. D. A. Clarkson, 'Bl, was then elected to fill the position of Vice-President; and Messrs. S. H. Esselstyne, 'B3, W. N. Eldridge, 'B3, and A. Harvey, 'B2, were successively elected to the offices of Secretary, Treasurer, and Librarian. There being no further business before the Society, it stood adjourned until Thursday, Oct. 5 th, 1880.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
About College. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

About College. T TOW many juniors will elect Anglo Saxon next year ? MAY 31st our eleven defeated Harvard by 10 wickets. They were very handsomely entertained by the home eleven, and enjoyed themselves greatly. SCRUGHAM is first honor man in the senior class. 'BO WILL have to brace to get M. A. in three years. SECOND-HAND " beavers " are scarce since the Burial. THE incoming freshman class promises to be the largest yet. PALMER has been chosen centre-field of the Freshman nine. WALTER, 'B3, is trying for coxswain of the freshman crew. MR. GOODWIN coaches the freshmen daily, from the steam launch. THE man who tried to keep his plug hat intact at the Burial gave it up at last. MEMBERS of 'B4 who wish to purchase chapel seats should apply to the seniors. THE Boat House is about the coolest place to be found when the thermometer is in the 90's. ALL members of 'B4 should purchase copies of the SPECTATOR Song Book for use during the summer. THE marks in mathematics this year do not show s...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

School of Mines Notes. | HE new pin worn by the civil engineers of the fourth year has been the subject .of much discussion amongst the students, and the comments are, as a rule, of an unfavorable nature. This is to be expected, to a certain extent, and would not detract from the value of the badge, if it were not so nearly universal. With two pins long established in the School and surrounded by associations, of course, a new one, whatever its merits, would appear second rate, and not till the pin shall have been established before the memory of the oldest class in the School will it stand on an equal footing with the others. Nevertheless, we hardly believe that prejudice is sufficient to account for the general disapprobation expressed, but consider a great part of it due to what are really defects in the design. The very cause which gives the other pins an advantage now, namely, the feeling which is connected with them, will always be against the new pin, even when it is no longe...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The College World. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

The College World. BOWDOIN: — Singing in.Chapel on Sunday afternoons is called for. The athletes are now bracing themselves. The sophomore crew are to have new oars from Donaghue of Newburg. Ivy Day will be celebrated on June 4th. It is proposed to put a nine in the field. No time to be lost if they wish to play any games. CORNELL : The nine defeated Union, 9 to 2. Cornell has been challenged by Princeton, 'B3, to a four-oared race. The Era supper took place on May 26th. Lawn tennis does not take at Ithaca. HARVARD : The 'BO Class Fund has reached $7,400 and is still growing. The Bicycle Club held its first dinner at Young's, on May 6th. Twenty-four gentlemen were present. The Echo still lives. The class athletic meetings were very successful in bringing forward men who could lower Harvard's records. The Bicycle Club has postponed its races owing to fewness of entries. Freeland has been chosen No. 2, on the 'Var- sity; Hooper, the other candidate, being substitute. Sophomores now ha...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Library. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

The Library. \ \ J E have just received a copy of the new edition of " The Little Tin-gods-on-wheels," published by Charles W. Sever, of Cambridge. This little volume, which is from the pen of Robert Grant, also contains " The Wallflowers," u The Chaperons " and "Oxygen —a Mount Desert Pastoral." These witty satires on our modern society are as entertaining as when they first appeared. The illustrations by P. G. Attwood, which are very clever, are good specimens of that artist's ability. THE Spirit of the Times recently made some very uncalled for remarks about the editors of the SPECTATOR, alleging that they were aware that Voorhees' jump was not genuine at the time that the statement was made in these columns that he, and not Wilmer had the record. The Editors did not know that Mr. Eldredge measured the jump to the heel-mark instead of " the first break in the ground," or they would not have claimed the record, but beyond this mistake we claim there was none made in measuring the ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Our Exchanges. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

Our Exchanges. TOURING the hot weather the exchange edi- ■^■> tor had serious thought of striking It was about 96° in the shade, and the thought of reading through the pile of exchanges that littered the table almost drove him to distraction. He asked himself what was the use of the exchange column, and was thinking of suggesting that it be thrown from the make up of the paper, when he remembered having read a criticism on another journal, asking why it could allot no space to its contemporaries. He also reflected, as he laid a piece of ice on top of his head and felt his resentment growing less vindictive, that there is a certain pleasure in receiving favorable notices, and that one of the surest ways of getting them is by praising one's exchanges, and how, thought he to himself, can that be done without the exchange column ? He then proceeded to cool himself with a mint julep, and the ice on his head having had the desired effect, he proceeded to attack the pile that la...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Shavings. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1880

Shavings. the convenience of our relations, and of -*■ sub-freshmen, and all whom it may concern, we give the definition of a few of the most common college words and phrases: A " rush " is a glib recitation. A " dead rush " is a recitation flawless, polished, and sparkling. A "fizzle" is when a student "thinks he knows, but can't quite express it." A " dead flunk " is made when a student refuses to get up out of his seat. To "pass" an examination is not to go by it, but to secure in it the necessary per cent, required for a degree. "Cramming" (except during vacation) is an intellectual rather than a gastronomical operation. " Cribs," in college, have no connection with nurseries, but with examinations, being intended not to rock their owners, but to pilot them over rocks. When a student " cuts" a Prof, he simply absents himself from his instruction, no blood being drawn, except perhaps, when he tries to get the absence excused. — Ex. WHEN the impecunious editor is scribbling, -tor ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1880

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. VI., No. 9. NEW YORK, JUNE 15th, 1880. SUPPLEMENT.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Library. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1880

The Library. NEW DEPARTURES IN COLLEGIATE CONTROL AND CULTURE. — By the Rev. Caleb Mills, Emeritus Professor of Greek, Wabash College, Indiana. A. S. Barnes & Cos.: New York and Chicago. 1880. pp. 50. p HIS is one of the most interesting and instructive little books on education that we have met with in a long time, and well worth reading by every trustee and professor throughout the United States. The writer, now since dead, expresses himself with great force and clearness, and the figures he employs to illustrate his meaning are ofttimes so novel in their application that they fix his words still more strongly in the memory. He urges on the trustees of all colleges the necessity of waking out of the Rip Van Winkle sleep into which many of them have fallen, and of getting out of the old ruts in which they have so long been traveling, and asks: "Would not an annual visit of a committee of the trustees, not only to lecture, express to the students the kind regards of the ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Correspondence. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1880

Correspondence. To the Editor of THE SPECTATOR: p HE announcement of our President at Commencement, in regard to electives, brought still more forcibly before me, as I have no doubt it did before others, the fact that the first man in the graduating class delivers a Greek address, and the second a Latin poem; and I asked myself what a man would do who had gotten through his three years' Greek by distasteful grinding, and who had elected Calculus in senior year, should he graduate first. Would he be capable of writing a Greek salutatory ? It seems to me a somewhat curious idea to have the Commencement exercises so arranged that a man who wants to stand first is compelled to take Greek, or else have someone else write his part for him; and I write this letter simply to put this opinion of mine before the college world, and see if I have any supporters of my views. " REFORM." P. S. —It has occurred to me that the difficulty is to be avoided by not allowing a man who did not elect Greek...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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