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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

fJTfw FTr'BPrygEB- The-Indian Advocate. 188 ki LOCALS. r- - r:- f I, "1 Born to Mr. and Mrs. George Lehman, a son. May young Dave live to make the joy of his fond parents, l-v Revs. FF. Clement and Vincent, O. S. B., are staying at St. Pat rick's Church, Dallas, Tex., till its Pastor's health is restored. Bro. Fidelis, O. S. B., made his triennial vows on Ascension Day, May 16. May he be more faithful than some of his deluded predecessors. At the present writing the erection of the new Indian School build- ing is in progress. Let us hope that it will be ready for occupancy by the first of September next. Venerable Sr. Patricia, the Provincial Visitor of the Sisters of St. Francis, went South to visit the Convents of the Order in the Dioceses of Natchez, Charleston and elsewhere. On Pentecost Day, May 26th, a numerous class of first communicants 1 approached the Lord's table in Shawnee, Okla. May the good Lord abide with these, His dear children, forever. 1 ' The Cherokee treaty, whi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

i8g The Indian Advocate. i9or CALENDAR. .TUNE. 1901 i. Ember Day. Of the Octave Semid. 2. Trinity Sunday D. 2 cl. 3. Apparition B. M. V. at Lourdes (Feb. 11) ... .D. maj. 4. St. Francis Caracciolo C D. 5. St. Boniface Bp. M. O. S. B D. 6. Corpus Christi D. 1 cl. with Oct. 7. Of the Octave x. Semid. . 8. Of the Octave Semid. 9. Sunday within the Octave '. . . . Semid. 10. Of the Octave Semid. 11. St. Barnabas the Apostle D. maj. 12. St. Leo III. Pp. C, O. S. B , .D. 13. Oct. of Corpus Christi (St. Anthony of Pad.). .D. 14. Sacred Heart of Jesus D. 1 cl. with Oct. 15. St. John a S. Facundo C D. 16. III. Sund. after Pent., St. Basil Bp. C. D.. ,.D. 17. St. Peter's Chair at Antioch (Feb. 22) D. maj. 18. St. Gregory VII. Pp. C, O. S. B. (May 25).. D. maj. 19. St. Juliana a Falconeris V D. 20. St. Cyril of Alexandria Bp. C. D. (Mch 15)... D. 21. Octave of the Sacred Heart (St. Aloysius) . . . .D. 22. Vigil St. Isidore Bp. C. D., O. S. B. (April 4) . .D. 23. IV. Sunday after Pentecost Semi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

The Indian Advocate Vol. XIII. JULY, 1991. No. 7 COMFORT. Whate'er my God ordains is right His will is ever just; Howe'er He orders now my cause I will be still and trust, He is my God; Though dark my road, He holds me that I shall not fall; Wherefor to Him I leave it all. Whate'er my God ordains is right He never will deceive; He leads me by His own right path, And so to! Him I cleave And take, content, What He hath sent; His hand can turn my griefs away, And patiently I wait His day. Whate'er my God ordains is right; Though I the cup must drink That bitter seems to my faint heart, I will not fear nor shrink: tw ' Tears pass away With dawn of day; Sweet comfort yet shall fill my heart, . . And pain and sorrow all depart. -Selected. J.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

igi The Indian Advocate. THE INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA. EXTRACT FROM THE GOVERNOR'S REPORT. The Indian population of Oklahoma Territory numbers 12,980, all under the care of five agencies, except 298 Arizona Apaches who are held at Fort Sill as prisoners of war. The enumeration at the different agencies is as follows: OSAGE AGENCY. Osage 1.798 I Kaw 213 WHITE EAGLE AGENCY. Ponca 56 I Otoe Pawnee 650 ' Tonka wa 372 59 SAUK AND FOX AGENCY. Sauk and Fox 528 Iowa 89 Shawnee 507 Pottawatomie 1,700 Kickapoo 246 DARLINGTON AGENCY. Cheyenne 2,037 Arapahoe 981 KIOWA AGENCY. Kiowa 1,139 Comanche 1,500 Apache 172 Wichita and affiliated tribes . 925 The Indians of the Territory are all making some pro gress, those whose lands have been allotted being distinctly in advance. , Allotment of lands, citizenship and cutting off of Gov ernment rations is certainly the solution of the Indian prob lem. The Indian is certainly a disappointment to the humani tarian who expects a few years of education to revolu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

The Indian Advocate. 192 of the Government and not allowed to mingle with white men or come 'in actual contact with the ways of civilization. In spite, however, of all the mistakes of policy applied to him, the Indian is slowly advancing, and the condition of the tribes in Oklahoma is, on the whole, really encouraging. I give below a communication received from Hon. John Jensen, agent in charge of the tribes at the White Eagle Agency-: There are four tribes of Indians under the supervision of this agency: Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe and Missouri, and Tonkawa. All the Indians of this agency have received' allotments of land and have, to a certain extent, adopted the pursuits of civilized life. The Poncas and Otoes still live upon reservations, but the Pawnees and Tonka was have no reservation; they live in organized counties of the Territory and are full-fledged citizens of the United States, except that they cannot dispose of their land. A great many of the allotments of these Indians have ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

193 The Indian Advocate. The stock possessed by the several tribes is is follows; Horses, - - - - , 1,945 Mules, --.----54 Cattle, - - -. - - 157 Swine, ... - - - --' - 300 ' Domestic fowls, - - , - - -1,760 i The Ponoa Indians cultivate 1,230 acres of land and have 5,600 acres .under fence. , x. The Pawnees cultivate 1,465 acres of land and have 10,920 acres under fence. The Otoes cultivate 2,300 acres and have 7,500 acres under fence. The Tonkawas work butt very little; they cultivate about 70 acres of land and have about 300 acres under fence. All of these Indians have done a little better the past year than they did the year previous. There are three boarding schools at this agency: The Ponca, the Pawnee, and Otoe, with a combined enrollment of 325 pupils. All of these schools have performed excellent work during the past year. 5 . We raise about enough forage at these schools to supply most., of the school and agency stock. The future of the Indian depends very largely upon suc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

Tun Indian Advocate. 194 merits. T,he Sacjind Fox, Indians are the remnant of one of the most powerful tribes that in the early part of the nine- Chief of the Sac and lox. teenth century inhabited the north central portion of the United States. In the war of 1812 they fought with the

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

195 The Indian Advocate. British. At the conclusion of that war they made treaty with the United States and were ceded a large area of land in Mis 'souri and Iowa. In 1836 a part of this tribe took up arms ,under Black Hawk against the United States and were finally defeated. Eventually they sold their land in Iowa and Mis souri and removed to Kansas. From there they came to Oklahoma. In 1890 they were allotted 160 acres of land each and received $485,000 for the remainder of their reser vation, $300,000 of which was placed to their credit with the .Treasurer of the United States, bearing 5 per cent interest. They had $1,000,000 on deposit, bearing the same interest, , derived from previous sales of their lands in Kansas, Mis souri and Iowa. The interest on these funds is paid to them semi-annually from this office. f The Sac and Fox, having been a warrior race, do not take kindly to farming, and as a result not more than forty are cultivating any land whatever, and not more than fi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

The Indian Advocate. 196 balance of their lands to the United States Government, the funds for which are now held in trust and being paid to them in installments. They have other funds in trust from which they receive about $60 per capita per year. A much larger per cent of the Iowas cultivate their lands than of the Sac and Fox. They are quite shrewd traders and nearly all speak English. The most of their lands are cultivated by themselves or leased. Their children are nearly all in a Gov ernment school at the Otoe Agency. Their members vary but little from year to year; the present census will show them to number go. They received a $15,000 payment of trust funds in June. The Absentee Shawnees have resided in Oklahoma for nearly 30 years. They were a powerful tribe that occupied a large portion of the lands now embraced in boundaries of the State of Ohio. The first treaty made with them by the United States Government was in 1788. In 1830 a treaty was made by which the Shawnees ce...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

197 The Indian Advocate. fortunate neighbors, the Sac and Fox, who "are still1 drawing large annuities. Sales from their lands amount to upwards of $40,000 per annum, the deeds of 'which are examined')' "the appraisements made, and the money paid to the Indians by the United States Indian agent. Some of their lands during the past three months have sold ,as high as $25 per acre. There are some good business men and farmers among the Shawnees. A Government boarding school for the Shawnees and Pottawatomies is located at Shawneetown, with Mary G. Williams as superintendent. About 100 pupils are in attend ance 10 months in the year, and most excellent work is being done. There is a strong probability that the school plant will be enlarged during the year and fitted with modern baths and appliances. The Shawnees are not increasing in num bers, but steadily holding their own. The present census will show about 507. The Pottawatomi were a powerful tribe that with other tribes inhabited th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

531 jtKmfr fswey11 The Indian Advocate. 198 f &tiil$LJbMii& to sell half of their allotments. The Pottawatomi have re xeceived no annuities for a number of years. They derive their living entirely from their lands and labor performed. There are among them good farmers, business men and tradesmen of nearly every kind. Their -children attend Ab sentee Shawnee School, the Mission School at Sacred Heart, and a few attend the district schools of Pottawatomie County. They have given up the dancing and dog eating which is still practiced by. their less civilized brethren. The sales of their lands amount to nearly $30,000 per year, which is paid to them through the agency. The Pottawatomi are not increas ing in numbers. Not receiving annuities, their census, for which no funds are provided by the Department, is estimated, and is thought to be about 1,700. Whisky drinking is one of the curses of the Indians, and when they have money white men will openly violate the law to sell it to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

199 The Indian Advocate. fc't v mnii rr Fj. JUOILCC. A Jubilee is essentially a time of reconciliation, of for giveness. As a matter of fact, it goes also by the name of the Great Pardon. And deservedly, for on such an occasion r the gates of divine mercy are, as it weie, flung wide open. 1 he power usually reserved to episcopal authority ot absolv- E ing from certain sins of a particularly grievous nature, is at such times extended to all priests, to the end that sinners may the more easily make their peace with God. So true is it that the Jubilee has been instituted primarily for them. And in this the Church shows herself true to the teaching and ex ample of her Divine Spouse, whose mission among men she is charged to continue. She is not unmindful that our Saviour exhibited a special predilection for sinners, to the extent that His frequent dealings with them was a stumbling block to the Jews. ''Why doth your master eat with pub licans and sinners?" (St. Matthew ix. n.) He said t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

, The -Indian Advocate. 200 ren of hers in the saddest of plights; it seems only natural, therefore, that she should extend a helping hand to them. Yes, the state of the sinner is indeed a sad one. By his N sin he has reared a wall of separation between God and him self. God has withdrawn from him, and where before, under the beneficent action of sanctifying grace, were riches, light, beauty, and all manner of ineffable gifts, there remain only darkness, nudity, dryness, and desolation. To divine life has succeeded spiritual and supernatural death. The trans formation somewhat resembles a certain sad spectacle occa sionally witnessed in nature. When, in the spring, the warm rain and sun clothe field and forest with life and greenness, the hope of a plentiful harvest fills the breast of the husband man. It imparts strength to his arm and joy to his heart. And as the growth progresses, the exultation of his spirit in creases apace. But, lo! an unexpected frost comes, and all is change...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

FTOWli PWWlWr T 201 The Indian Advocate. disciples of the God of charity, we must needs experience heartfelt compassion for them all. But, at the same time, are there not among their number some who appeal to each one of us in a more particular manner, or are even closely con nected with us? Can we look upon these, blindly hastening 4o eternal perdition, and not be deeply concerned about them? Surely not. Our more enlightened and livelier faith urges us to bestow upon them all the helps we command: exhorta tions, advice, prayer, penances in a word, we must leave no means untried to prevail upon them to profit by the great grace of the Jubilee. In winning the souls of our brethren we shall have won more than the richest treasures. And what joy we shall thus afford the Heart of Jesus! 'Tis easy to imagine the feelings of our Divine Redeemer at the sight of so many souls, victims of the devil and in mo mentary danger of falling into hell, souls for whom He has shed the last drop of His...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

The Indian Advocate. 202 Satan and place them in the peace of Jesus' Heart. I may hope that my efforts have not been in vain; perhaps several owe their salvation, after God, to me." For assistance in this holy work, let us have recourse to Our Lady of the Sacred Heart. Better than any one else, she possesses the secret of bringing back strayed sheep to the fold. 'Tis her mission, and she shows plainly enough how dear she holds it. Among the many favors she is constantly granting her children, in answer to their prayers, the conver sion of obstinate sinners holds the place of honor. She cer tainly desires that the present year should be a Jubilee indeed for the Heart of her Divine Son. Now we know that the greatest joy of that Adorable Heart is the return of prodigals who have foolishly left their Father. Let us, then, beg Our Lady, our sweet Mediatrix, to deign offer to Jesus whatever we are able to do towards the conversion of sinners. Our humble offering will thus be invested with...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

'Ajiipjgjpiij5! ,TOjrTTl:T"W5VVTTi'' 4-,T'w "S"--, KI3V. l'ATIIMH flllHJIANrs, O. N. ., SUA WINK H i T i i' tr I i I It AM ill i n ntMKutMl i t ITT mini Trim inn .. ', "J""""""UliliaiiiiiillniiMi ii -jwwi

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

-f!8 jW11! g WWPffyv1! W11 W ""' "" ' 1 . The Indian Advocatc. 204 REV. FATHER GERMANUS, 0. S. B. Ntf ' JFKOM .THE "BIOGRAPHICAL UECORD OF OKLAHOMA." To France, more than to any other Latin country, it has j1 been given to send forth into the world of necessity many of I - i,- , - .,ui i ,i....i 1 . r it. m.....i. ...v. r 4-Vm iv l midst of crude, but ofttimes enormQusly promising surround- . . . . . . I... .. . . 1 ingb, nave wielded an extended influence tor good in rne J niotal and mateiial development. The magnitude ut the wotk accomplished h ilie adhetents ol the most powerlul re ligious organization in the world is inconceivable from any &, -x -point of view, and undoubtedly has its foundation in the hearts of the disciples whose faith, -nobility 'and self-sacrifice have found no country -too1 remote, arid no condition too aus tere for the dissemination of a saving light, sifted through f centuries of unchanging belief. It is doubtful it this particu- ., lar corner ot the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

tflBr t rwrn rm'-SVJp 205 The Indian Advocate. i f the only one who has sought the larger possibilities of Ameri ca. Up to his thirteenth year he was raised on a farm, at whigh time he entered la Pierre Qui Vire Monastery, where he studied from 1873 until 1880, and completed the classical and philosophical course. The Monastery, in the meantime, had been transferred to Ireland, at Fox Rock, near Dublin, and here he continued to study until 1882, devoting his time to the further pursuit of philosophy and to theology. At the expiration of his training he immediately emigrated to Amer ica and settled at the Sacred Heart Mission in Pottawatomie County, Okla. At the Mission he was ordained by Bishop Gallagher, of Galveston, Tex., and was sent to McAlester and given charge of the Catholic church at that place for a year. While there he also administered to the spiritual wants of the Miami, Quapaw and Seneca tribes of Indians, and in one day had seventy-five baptisms, all adults. In the Os...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

The Indian Advocate. 206 trated efforts. Among the many other churches founded by Father Germanus is the one at Minco. It may be said that he has covered the whole of southwest Oklahoma and founded all of the churches there. By correspondence with Mother Catherine Drexel, of Philadelphia, he secured a priest and founded St. Patrick's Mission Convent, a school for the Indian Sisters of St. Francis. April 17, 1898, when Father Felix de Grasse was appoint ed Abbot of the Sacred Heart, Father Germanus was appoint ed his successor as pastor of the congregation of St. Benedict, at Shawnee. Under his wise and capable management the congregation has more than doubled in numbers, and in 1900 was begun the erection of the imposing new brick church, which is to cost $60,000. This is to be augmented by a par sonage, and a school on the other corner of the block. The parochial school conducted in connection with the church is a fine institution of learning, and is conducted by the Sisters of Mer...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1901

i-r Wj . fc 1 V. flt I:' L fr-lvv? r 207 The Indian Advocate. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE.. published me the benedictink fathers op SACRED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Henedict. - Approved by Rt. Rev. Theo. Meerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories. TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTION! Single Copies , , i5c- Annual.... Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . . .75c foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter .it Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PIUVILEOKSl 1. Ecry Subscriber and Hcnefactor will participate in all the merits, prayer and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2 A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Hencfactors , 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Hcnefactors 4. Every year, in the month of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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