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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

Hocks which formed the chief posses sions of the Jewish people and their neighbors. The spoils of war and the tribute of vassal kings largely consist ed of sheep. Thus we read Mesha, King of Moab, was a sheep master, and rendered unto the King of Israel 100, --000 lambs and 100,000 rams with the wool. Moses, after his victory over the Midianites, obtained as loot no less than 675,000 sheep, and long before the Christian era sheep were cultivated in Western Europe. Spain and Italy pos sessed them from an unknown period, although long after Rome was founded the inhabitants had not learned to shear the fleece; and, until the time of Pliny, the practice of plucking it from the skin was not wholly abandoned, so long that the humble shepherds of Syria preceded, in their knowledge of necessary arts, the future conquerors of their country. Horse Show Dates Changed. After due consideration and request among the horse breeders of various districts, the management of the Lewis and Clark Exposi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

16 YOU BE THE JUDGE t |£y^^^^S^^B^i4.4|^W^^jte« disgruntled manufacturers and agents of the "other kind" of Cream Scpara f IssEKk I tors (all others being of the old bucket-bowl type) try to make the dairy '^aMr© ■ SS^^^ri^ VH public believe that the TUBULAR is not what we claim it to be. It is not nec ; f *^^!^UkpfSl^^^^^^^mS^3k essary for us to say anything further than: "You be your own judge." Turn the ! ■ &i crank of any make" of the "other kind," then turn the crank of a TUBULAR. You ,'^^f^^f^^Mm^S^jK/^Sgf won't need anybody else to tell you which of the two runs easiest. The TUBULAR & Ki^^fil^ff^^S^^^SP »i will tell you that itself. Then pour the tin trimmings out of the bowl of any make of R^wßKSßllMkl^^^^SS^^ the "other kind" on to a table. Unscrew the TUBULAR bowl and take out the one -•'-"^^BB^M^jß™B^feS^#y little piece from inside of it, and set that alongside of the other outfit. You won't ■ •'& ""'S^» '>X .?Ei X need anyone to tell you which of the two i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

.JS^^EW — -* •■ •^■^^"i — ~ • tJ*— ,»••*»•■*• ••• • " *•*•*.*■» W, . VOL. XXIT. NO. 14. Prof. W. J. SPILLMAN Agrostologist \J. S. Department of Agriculture MANY of our readers will recog nize in the cut on this page the likeness of one of the hardest workers in the interest of the agricultural classes and a man who, more than any one else, is responsible for the gi eater diversity of farming in the stata of Washington. Prof. W. J. Spillman, of the bureau of plant industry, United States department of agriculture, is the gentleman to whom we have ref erence; and as he is coming to the northwest sometime during next month a brief sketch of his life and a presentation of his gi-nial features will not be out of place. Prof. Spillman first saw the light on a farm in Lawrence county, Mis souri, on October 23, 1863, and until he was seventeen years old he remain ed on the farm, attending the district school and working 'tween times. Af ter teaching in the home bchool for one year he went t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

2 EXPERIENCES All subscribers are Invited to write for this column. For each accepted article we give 30 cents, either In subscription or advertis ing. Make your articles brief and write as often as you like. Alfalfa Experiences Wanted. The Ranch has inquiries about the growing of alfalfa in the Puget Sound region, and would like to hear from those who have had experience along this line. Full details are desired. Hogs Destroy Worms.—Last year many people in our district had theii alfalfa crop much hurt by worms. One neighbor, M. S. Williams, sent some of the worms to the experiment sta tion in our state, and it was learn ed they were from the moth that is present in such numbers at times. I was the only one to escape the invas ion, or at least, I was not damaged and did not notice any worms and no one could account for it, but think now I l<now the reason. Three of my neigh bors have this spring followed my ex ample by hog-fencing their farms and turning hogs into the alfalfa, a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

THE RANCH Office: 576 Col man Building MILLER FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors F. WALDKN. H. U BLANCHARD MRS. 8. a. WEBSTER. I*Biied the First and Fifteenth Bach M« B tU Subscription, in advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle subscrib ers are required to pay |1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscriptions. Oood commissions and sal aries paid to hustlers. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In wr«tlng. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer as we cannot find It on our list frsm the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expira tion != :hcv.n on your paoer by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regu...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

4 HORTICULTURE r. WALDEN The state board of horticulture of Oregon has brought out a very credita ble report for the years 1904-5. I am indebted to George H. Lamberson for a copy of this report. He is the effi cient secretary of the Oregon board. In this respect Oregon is far ahead of her sister state, Washington. The state of Washington gets out no report. We have a cumbersome and expensive hor ticultural arrangement, but it is hard to see any efficiency in it. The state is not lacking in enterprising horticul turists, but the management of our state organization is in the hands of the politicians or those who are de pendent on the politicians for their pull, and the result is that nothing is done that amounts to anything. How soon things may take a turn for the better it is hard to tell. The governor, who appoints the horticultural com missioner, seems to be under the thumb of the men who engineered him into office and they know about as lit tle about the interests of horticulture...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

men who have Oregon exhibits are gentlemen and treat visitors as they ought to be treated. It is the people who have paid for concessions that orment the general public. The fair management may have found it neces sary to sell these concessions in order to meet the expenses of the fair, but it is to be regretted that such a neces sity exists. The true idea of a fair ex hibit is to advertise and not to sell. Some exuibitors give away samples in order to advertise their goods. That iS right. I care not how much noise a man makes in advertising. Let him carry out to the fullest the old doggerel that runs in this wise: The man who whispers down a well \bout the goods he has to sell. Will never reap the shining dollar l,ike onn who climbs a tree to "holler. * * • Some people have strange ideas about what we ought to exhibit. One good woman scolded in good female fashion one day because we did not have in our exhibit a fine collection of Indian curios which we could have se cured at a hea...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

(i THE DAIRY Winter or Summer Dairying. The following article on winter and summer dairying by A. W. Trow is timely and exceedingly important. Tn our opinion winter dairying, if proper ly conducted, is vastly more profitable, in fact, we believe that a winter cow under proper conditions is equal to two spring cows of the same capacity, but as emphasized by Mr. Trow, the conditions must be favorable, other wise winter dairying will be a failure. "When the cow is left to herself hor choice for freshening is usually in the late spring. It is at this time that nature provides an abundance of those foods which are required by her for the proper regulation of her system. The succulent grass, with its laxative tendencies, contributes to the proper adjustment of her maternal organs for the work in hand. "Quite frequently the cow that brings but small returns in winter, for lack of proper care, will make a good showing during the warm, sunny days of spring and summer. It is the warmth, the s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

through unclean separators, bring their cream in dirty cans and make trouble for the butter-makers gener ally. It is possible, we believe, to make the average patron see the ne cessity for cleanliness; and it lie 3 with the creamery management and the butter-maker to accomplish this. It's no small task. It can't be com pleted in a moon. It will require a ceaseless warfare; but a little effort will soon show results. In the cam paign for quality lies the creamery's success —and the patron's too —for if one suffers so does the other. How to Sell Butter. In the open market dealers prefer to have no private stencil or trade mark on the package, and especially do they object to the name and address, writes J. H. Monrad in an exchange. If you use these and your butter is not up to the standard, leave them off, and in any case always notify your receiver if for some reason a shipment or part of one is not as good as usual. Too much stress cannot be laid on keeping the packages clean and pr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

6 HOUSEHOLD MM 8. O. WIBBTEB Bern* communication* (or this department to Mrs. 8. a. Webiter, 119 Colman Block, Heattle. or direct to The Ranch. All ques tion! will bo carefully answered; contribu tion* (or publication ar« welcome. True Economy. Let no woman think she is econo mical and pride herself on it because she has no luxuries in table or dress. Doing without things is not economy— it's only cheating yourself with a false idea. True economy is really making the best use of things—and it is rob bing yourself of a great deal if you are deprived in one direction at the hevy cost of somethng else. The woman who does not have nice things —the best meats and the best vege tables —does not know how to save the nice little bits that are left to make over into dainty dishes for another t j me _ s he probably also makes some one in the family ill, with cheap fruit or vegetables, and spends more on a doctor's bill and in her own strength than would twice cover an original wise expenditur...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

to mix well, boil again and cool. Pre pare lettuce by using tender leaves cut quite fine, pour over the Sressing and serve. —A Rancher's Wife. Answers to Correspondents. T. J. M. —The onl> people who can peas successfully are the ones who have large establishments, and put them up for sale. I have tried many times to find out the process, but this they will not tell —and unless you know some one connected with a cannery I don't Know how you will find out the method. I should try putting the peas in the Mason jars, filling them with cold water and setting them in a wash boner with slats across the bottom, the cold water to come to very nearly the top of jars. Let boil gently so as not to break the peas until they are tender. Then fill the jars to overflowing with boiling water and screw on the lids — giving an extra turn to them occasion ally and setting them upside down to make sure no air can get in. I should then let them stand upside down perm anently. For preserving cherries,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

10 POULTRY i H. L. BLANCHARD • Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detail** and questions prove of treat benefit. Write to H. U Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Let Hens Moult Early. The moulting season is upon us once again, and we should get the hens to moulting as fast as possible. It is the early moulting hens that make the early fall and continuous winter layers. There is no use for its requiring three months for a hen to shed her old coat and take on her new one. July is the month to get your hens into condi tion to moult. Put your hens on short rations for the next two or three weeks. Shut oft the corn diet, and instead feed them something like wheat bran and mid dlings. This sort of diet will soon reduce their flesh. Get them down in flesh as much as possible. This treat ment will stop the egg supply, but this should not in the least interest you in asmuch as you are not expecting eggs during this treatment. Aft...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

to Japan and other Oriental points. They handle both domestic and game fowls and endeavor to meet every whim of the market. The proprietors, although young men, have had much experience in the handling of this class of meats, which fact has en abled them to build up a most sub stantial business, that is constantly in creasing with the growth of the north west. It is worth while for the read ers of The Ranch to write the firm and find out what they can do to ar range for receiving regular shipments from numerous sections not now repre sented on their list. For one of limited means the poultry business offers greater inducements than any other, says an exchange. Parties who cannot venture into the more expensive branches of live stock breeding have unusual advantages in the poultry business, among them be ing the fact that poultry and eggs are always salable and at high prices. Fowls rapidly multiply, and this fact enables one to begin in a small way and gradually increase and extend ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

12 THE FIELD Cucumbers as a Field Crop. The manager of a large cucumber salting plant in the east gives some Valuable information in regard to growing them for market. He said i hat land not naturally well drained should be fall plowed in back furrows about ten feet apart, and a coat of well-rotted stable manure evenly spread on the furrows. In spring it should be replowed and another coat of manure put on. This is harrowed in and the piece fitted for planting about corn planting time. The piece is marked in rows six feet apart and (he seed scattered evenly in the marks and covered. If the piece cannot have a second coat of manure, fertilizer or manure should be scattered in the drills and covered before the seed is dropped. If poultry manure is used in the drills it should be mixed with gypsum. Shallow cultivation of the plants is done at frequent intervals until the running vines prevent. They must be kept clean of weeds at all hazards. Picking is done by women at ten cents an hou...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

LIVE STOCK Animals Eligible to Registry. There is a surprisingly large num ber of men who do not understand the difference between an animal that has been graded up from a nondescript foundation, by the use of pure-bred sires, and one whose sire and dam are already on the registration books. Time and again we have heard an ani mal called a "pure-bred," when upon making inquiry we found that it con tained three or four pure-bred crosses, but that it was not eligible to regis tration, for the simple reason that its dam could not be placed on record. As far as the merit of the animal is concerned, five or six crosses in which a pure-bred, meritorious male is used in each instance may result in practically reproducing the pure-bred characteristics, but so long as the foundation stock is not eligible to record, there is no possibility of the progeny being recorded, and it is there fore erroneous to call such an animal "pure-bred." True it is that there are many scrub pure-breds, while on...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

14 tamed. We would like to hear from parties who raise milch goats—and can probably help make an occasional sale for those who have any to sell. The following brief notes should be of interest to those who keep milk giving goats. Those who are familiar with the subject pretty nearly all agree in their claims as to the value of goats' milk for invalids, for chil dren and for cookery. Some of them regard it as most beneficial when taken medicinally for certain diseases or ailments. Goats' milk is especially recom mended for infants because of its sim ilarity in composition to mothers' milk ■—and medical literature is full of in stances of success attending the use of this milk with children that, pre vious to its use, were rapidly wasting away. Most authors who are assured of the complete digestibility of goat's milk, and who recommend its use above all others, base their opinions on results obtained from feeding chil dren several months old. The trouble in this country has been that ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

to Keeping the skin flexible, as well as furnishing the necessary nourish ment for the hair to keep it soft and glossy. It will not do, therefore, for these pores to get clogged, for in that case the skin soon would become dry, rough, hard and diseased; nor is there much danger of it except when the horse is hard at work. Then the se cretion of watery fluid is heavier than when the animal is idle, and if the sweat is allowed to dry on the skin, dust will accumulate, mixing with it, and, if not cleane doff, fill and clog the pores. As a result the skin will not only become diseased, but the whole system more or less deranged. The impurities, unable to escape through the skin, will accumulate in different places and give rise to blist ers, which, if neglected, may lead to blood poisoning or something else nearly as bad. By regular, thorough grooming, however, all this will be prevented, the pores kept open, and a healthier, thriftier condition of the animal maintained. A horse having ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1905

16 YOU BE THE JUDGE : *?t. **%HE disgruntled manufacturers and agents of the "other kind" of Cream Separa- W 'is&h I tors (al* others being of the old bucket-bowl type) try to make the dairy ? f^9HDH^Hß|^^^^9w£l3^B public believe that the TUBULAR is not what we claim it to be. It is not nec- I j J^jjff/klf^llfm^S^SK^^ * m essary for us to say anything" further than: "You be your own judge." Turn the I ) Jl crank of any make" of the "other kind," then turn the crank of a TUBULAR. You / I *0 % Tro^pHi won't need anybody else to tell you which of the two runs easiest. The TUBULAR I AVx^jy v_ ~~BBBllBii^&i^Ml will tell you that itself. Then pour the tin trimmings out of the bowl of any make of .! '^^fcnHpSK t&'^Srfsf *■ the "other kind" on to a table. Unscrew the TUBULAR bowl and take out the one BsSlW!!sKi!mßßlMfcgg3!S^ flr W little piece from inside of it, and set that alongside of the other outfit. You won't j &^^M^^Hll.' ,; v.ffc.CT need anyone to tell you which of t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

v^" : * - "^^^^^WP^MMBL"" ~- ~~ ~ ' - —a^^^^RHH^fl^^^Br^^^iSSi^BffSfl^^Bt^^^' —^BB8wWIBIB^~ —~"*~,^mHI^j^^BMlL <^^HbWIH^N. . VOL. XXII. NO. 15. RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL CO-OPERATION In the early days at Sunnyside church services were held in the school house. D. B. Eby, S. H. Miller and S. J. Harrison were the pioneer preachers. These men, all Dunkards. were engaged in developing farms. They saw to it, however, that the pul pit was filled each Sunday morning and evening. They always welcomed (he visiting ministers and many ap pointmentfl wore filled by them. The doom of the church (school house) were thrown open and at an early day other protestant denominations were represented. The congregations grew and in a few years the school build ing with its folding door arrangement became too small to hold the people. By this time there were regular ap pointments by five or six denomina tions, all laboring for the common good. There was a feeling of common brotherhood prevailing that create...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1905

2 may be wise on such places where the soil is a light sand and lacking in plant food and also unable to retain moisture to grow green crops and plow them under when coming into head. Rye. vetch, clover or buckwheat may be sown in the fall after the wheat crop has been removed and plowed under the next May or June. Any of these crops will grow readily on poor land and will furnish a large amount of vegetable matter to plow under. (Mover or vetch will be better than either of the crops mentioned because they Avould not only add vegetable matter to the soil, but during that period of growth can accumulate ni trogen from the air. The addition of this vegetable mat ter to the soil not only adds plant food, but aids in setting free some of the plant food already in the soil and making it available for the crop. It also aids light soils in absorbing and retaining moisture, a very im portant consideration on arid farms. While green manuring has not come into general practice, it seems that...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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