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Elephind.com contains 5,693 items from Virginia Farm Bureau News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1953

NO. 20 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO Save this page for future reference A disease runs a on a diseased a tobacco specimen in order to deter- ||5!3 mine nature of the disease. jMg-' ' - ■ «S«lI A disease clinic worker runs a series of tests on a diseased a tobacco plant specimen in order to determine nature of the disease. Some diseases can be definitely identified by the symptoms shown by the sick plants. Many growers who are familiar with Black Shank can easily recognize typical cases of this disease in a tobacco field. However, identification is not always easy. Under certain conditions, symptoms may not be clear-cut or characteristic, and they may be confusing or misleading. Many different diseases have similar symptoms. Just as many human diseases cause fever or headache, many plant diseases cause root decay or wilting of the leaves. Therefore, it is often necessary to make an examination of diseased tissues under a microscope or to carry out certain types of laboratory tes...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1953

4- How Flexible Support Law Works (From front page) makes sense and it is sound. For tobacco farmers price supports remain at 90 per cent of parity unless growers vote against quotas in which case there would be no price supports whatever. This is what tobacco farmers said they wanted and Congress wrote it into the Act. For all other basic commodities (peanuts, corn, wheat, cotton and rice) the price support level will be 90 per cent of parity so long as supplies are kept at, or only slightly above normal levels. As supplies of a basic commodity move above the normal range, in general, for each two per cent added to supplies in surplus, there is a one per cent drop in the price support level. In the case of cotton and peanuts, for example, if the supply percentage is not over 108 per cent of normal, the support level is 90 per cent of parity. When the supply exceeds 108 per cent but not more than 110 per cent, the support level will be 89 per cent of parity. Not until the supply per...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1953

MAY, 1953 Viewing The Peanut Program By William V. Rawlings, Executive Secretary Association of Virginia Peanut A Hog Growers, Inc. that the anticipated reduction in peanut allotments is a reality, it is perhaps a good time to review the reasons considered by the Department in reaching (he decision to reduce allotments about nine per cent and also look at several favorable aspects of the present position of Virginia producers. Our Association vigorously sought to avoid the nine per cent cut, but the Department of Agriculture reached conclusion the cU t was necessary in order to avoid a surplus production. Factors considered were the current CCC inventory of 48,000 tons from the 1951 crop, the record yield per acre in 1952 and the fact the bulk of the 1952 crop moved at about 1 cent per pound below support price. We can avoid the recurrance of this reason in future years by an expanded use of farm and co-operative loans, thus creating a more orderly marketing condition. The 1952 yiel...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1953

6 Southern Training School (From front page) classes dealing with practical county problems. The classes and instructors are as follows: History and Philosophy of Farm Bureau, Mrs. C. N. DeShazo, president, associated women of the AFBF; Coordination of Farm Bureau Program, Harry Bryson, director of field services, AFBF; Women's Activities in Farm Bureau, Mrs. Marie Daugherty, director women's activities, AFBF, and Mrs. Eugene Jones, Southern region reresentative board of directors, associated ivomen, AFBF; Farm Bureau Public Relations, Ed Lipscomb, public relations director, National Cotton Council; Rural Youth in RESERVATION BLANK DEAD LINE: JUNE 15 Clip and send to Pick Butler, Box 28, Richmond 8, Va. (Man and wife use same blank) Name Mailing Address Phone County F. B | J Richmond, July 6, 7:30 a. m. I plan to meet the delegation at [ ] Petersburg " 8:15 a. m. [ ] Emporia " 9:15 a. m. [ ] Enclosed $26.17 for one person—mileage only— [ ] I am quota county delegate and am not requi...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1953

MAY, 1953 \FBF Asks More Funds For Three Agencies, OKs Cut Disappointment that three agencies of the United States Department of Agriculture have not bee n allotted more funds in the budget recommendations of Secre(a,v Ezra Taft Benson was expressed by the Board of Directors 0 f the American Farm Bureau federation at their meeting in Chicago this month. Two of these appropriations— farm research and Foreign Agricultural Service—have been increased over 1953 figures, but by smaller amounts than had been hoped for. A third—the Cooperative Extension Service—will require special Congressional authorization for additional funds. The AFBF directors stressed the n eed for increased funds for these three agencies because they believe that these programs are important in the solution of farm problems. A bill to authorize an increase in the funds to be spent for extension work will probably be introduced in this session of Congress. If such a bill is passed, AFBF may ask for a supplemental ap...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1953

3 Free Advertising for VFBF Members The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service to the readers of the News. Members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation may use this service at no cost. Simply state name, address, and Farm Bureau to which you belong. Limit number of words to 50 per ad, and number of ads per issue to two per person. Please type, or print clearly your advertisement. Deadline for advertising is the 15th of the month prior to next date of issue. For non-members rates are: 6 cents per word for one insertion; 5 cents per word for each insertion where three or more insertions are ordered. Minimum charge is 50 cents. Cash must accompany orders. Send ads to: Virginia Farm Bureau News, Box 28, Richmond 3, Va. FOR SALE: John Deere Auguer fed blower, six inch pipe for 50 foot silo, latest model hay and silage distributor. Phone Fife 7-3331, ask for Nilsen. 5, 6 mf FOR J3ALE: 24 pure bred Angus heifers. Half are 18 months old ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

Virginia FarJpureau News All Editorial Matter May Be Reprinted Vol. 14, No. 6 Dividend Voted By VFB AFBF Asks Less Federal Control Of 'Farm Credit 1 WASHINGTON—The American Farm Bureau Federation last week urged Congress to approve legislation proposing to limit federal control over t he Farm Credit System and move the program closer to the "grass roots." Warren Haw ley, Jr., president of t he New York Farm Bureau Federation and a member of the AFBF board of directors, told House and Senate Agriculture Committees that in view of the fact that farm credit institutions are now largely owned by members, control should be largely shifted to "owner members." Hawley was one of several witnesses who appeared in support of S. 1505 and H. R. 4353 which would limit federal control to supervision by a "part time policy board composed of persons appointed by the President, by and with the advise and consent of the Senate from a list on nominees selected by borrowers." The Farm Bureau spokesman ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture 99 Is published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc. at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription $1.00 per year, Included In membership dues. Entered as second-class matter February 17, 1941, at the post office at Richmond, Virginia, additional entry at Washington, D. C. under the Act Of March 3, 1879. Editorial and Business Offices, 9th and Marshall Streets, Box 28, Richmond 3, Va. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers President H. Guy Blalock Vice-Presidents First District— Geo. R. Mapp, Jr. Fifth District—C. B. Atwell First District—C. L. Carr Seventh District—W. H. Wright Second District—Ralph Metts Eighth District —Geo. R. Hudgins Third District—T. T. Curtis At-Large—C. M. Ritchie Fourth District— Geo. W. Palmer At-Large—Thomas B. Hall Ninth District —C, B. Atwell Executive Secretary Director of Insurance Director of Organization M. A. Hubbard Alden E. Flory Cullen Johnson Treasurer Office Secretary Director o...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

NO. 21 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO Save this page for future reference Harvest and Grade Carefully for Greater Tobacco Profits HARVESTING When harvesting Flue-cured tobacco, prime only mature leaves of the same degree of ripeness — for uniformity is essential to good cures and to good quality in the cured leaf. By priming only two to four uniformly ripe leaves at harvest, less time will be required to sort the crop, and it will fall into fewer lots. The tobacco will more nearly fit the regular grades and show less of the special factors. The first one or two primings can, and should be, harvested a little less ripe than the remainder of the crop; otherwise, the thin leaves at the bottom tend to be dead or chaffy, and might sponge unless dried very rapidly at curing time. Many of the varieties used today grow and mature with a light-green or yellow-green color in the leaf. This frequendy results in their being harvested on the green or immature side and often produces slick, im...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

4 Brannan Reportedly Hired As Lawyer By Farmers' Union Charles F. Brannan, former Secretary of Agriculture, is re ported to have accepted a position as chief counsel for the National Farmers' Union, with officers at Denver. Gus Geissler, who served as head of the Production and Marketing Administration under Mr. Brannan, has already joined FU as vice president, with offices at Washington, D. C. U. S. Exports Drop WASHINGTON, D. C.—IFAP)— The value of United States agricultural exports during 1952 declined by 15 per cent compared with 1951, according to the Interregional Federation of Agricultural Producers. Farm exports were valued at three billion 425 million dollars. The agricultural exports accounted for 23 per cent of the total U. S. exports in 1952, compared with 27 per cent the previous year. In pre-war years it averaged 29 per cent. Wheat and wheat flour were the most valuable agricultural exports during 1952. Grain (From front page) graham, Lindsey-Robertson, Roanoke; C. D. ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

■tiiNEt 1953 Mr. Litterbug I state by the Virginia Anti-Litter Bug Council, organized to encourage the proper disposal of empty on tainers and all other forms of trash that now mar Virginia highways, farms and public places. Approximately one-half million tax dollars are being spent annually by the Highway Department to clear trash ro m public highways. t - ■f 9 Viewing The Peanut Program By William V. Rawlings, Exec. Sec. Association of Virginia Peanut and Hog Growers, Inc. (Note: On May 10, 1953, the following article by Mr. Freeman appeared in the Norfolk Virginian Pilot. It Is such an excellent apraisal of the producers' state in developing and practicing more orderly marketing of peanuts, we feel It appropriate to devote this month's column to reproducing the article. If produces will follow the sound reasoning of Mr. FreeWan, it would appear to be little question about producers receiving 100 percent of parity for their crop). By John W. Freeman Nansemond County Farm Agent SUF...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

6 SH USDA Reorganization Plan As Approved By Senate Analysed As the News goes to press, the Reorganization of the U. S. Department of Agriculture Plan number two has just been approved by the Senate and hearings are beginning in the House. In the Senate hearings the American Farm Bureau Federation urged the approval of the plan because it would give the needed authority to the Secretary of Agriculture over individual agencies commensurate with his responsibilities but at the same time provide the means by which federal farm programs could be moved closer to the people they serve. Indications are that the plan will not be passed in the House without heavy support from county farm leaders. In order for farmers to understand the provisions of the plan more fully, the following are parts of a radio interview with Frank Woolley, AFBF legislative counsel, Senator Clinton P. Anderson (D) of New Mexico, former secretary of agriculture, and Senator George D. Aiken (R) of Vermont, chairman of...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

TTINE, 1953 Officers and Wives o aker at the annual banquet meeting. Front row seated left to right: Mrs. W. D. Straughan, Mrs. L. A. !!n lS e, Mrs. L. L. Sisson, Miss Mary Porter Hall, secretary, and Mrs R. B. Massey. Second row: Mrs. J. P. W. D Straughan, newly elected president, L.A. Muse, W. H. E. Harvey, F. F. Chandler and Mrs. Chandler. Back Row: W. F. Massey, J. P. Jenkins, L.L. Sisson, Carl Flemer Jr., and R. B. Massey, outgoing president. .. > jm BhL I&BIII An Explanation: Child-Labor Requirements 1. Do the child-labor requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Ac apply to agriculture f Yes. They apply generally to farmers whose crops or products go either directly or indirectly into interstate or foreign commerce, as in the case of a farmer who sends his product outside the State or delivers his product to a canner, processor, or dealer who he knows or has reason to believe will send it outside the State, either in its original form or as an ingredient...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1953

8_ Free Advertising for VFBF Members The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service to the readers of the News. Members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation may use this service at no cost. Simply state name, address, and Farm Bureau to which you belong. Limit number of words to 50 per ad, and number of ads per issue to two per person. Please type, or print clearly your advertisement. Deadline for advertising is the 15th of the month prior to next date of issue. For non-members rates are: 6 cents per word for one insertion; 5 cents per word for each insertion where three or more insertions are ordered. Minimum charge is 50 cents. Cash must accompany orders. Send ads to: Virginia Farm Bureau News, Box 28, Richmond 3, Va. FOR SALE: John Deere Auguer fed blower, six inch pipe for 50 foot silo, latest model hay and silage distributor. Phone Fife 7-3331, ask for Nilsen. 5, 6 mf FOR SALE: 24 pure bred Angus heifers. Half are 18 months . ol...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1953

The Farm Bureau News uriTH nt u S 0 H3BIOHXS 3MIHd3SOr g Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and Its Associated Women \ „«. xf, INO. ( Welcome Fairfax Federation and are now conducting a charter membership drive. Pictured are the temporary officers, front row, left to right, H. F. Myers, Wilson McNair, chairman, French Trammel, secretary and treasurer. Back row, C. P. Jones, John Hammil, Roy Money, Hugh Dailey, field representative, VFBF; and j B. Smith. Other members of the organization committee not pictured are O. K. Miller and C. K. WilIrpnson. , Industry Opposes Present Convict Labor Program As Hurting Private Enterprise Representatives of industry spoke at a VALC hearing last month, in opposition to the competition being afforded private business by state convict labor. Only the cities of Danville and Martinsville, the Agricultural Conference Board and the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation gave testimony favoring the present program. Representatives of the Virginia Road Builders Ass...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1953

2 The Virginia Faim Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture 99 Is published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc. at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription $1.00 per year, included In membership dues. Entered as second-class matter February 17, 1941, at the post office lit Richmond. Virginia, additional entry at Washington. D. C. under the Act Of March 3, 1379. Editorial and Business Offices, 9th and Marshall Streets, Box 28. Richmond 3, Va. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers President H. Guy Blalock Vice-Presidents First District—Goo. R. Mapp, Jr. Fifth District—C. B. At well First District—C. L. Carr Seventh District—W. H. Wright Second District—Ralph Metts Eighth District —Geo. R. Hudgins Third District —T. T. Curtis At-Large—C. M. Ritchie Fourth District— Geo. W. Palmer At-Large—Thomas B. Hall Ninth District —C. B. Atwell Executive Secretary Director of Insurance Director of Organization M. A. Hubbard Alden E. Flory Cullen Johnson Treasurer Office Secretary Director...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1953

NO. 22 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO Save this page for future reference 7J - $&j '■'* '.-^H Tobacco Workers' Conference Helps Growers to Prosper During the week of June 22, 1953, the Fluecured Tobacco Workers' Conference was held at North Carolina State College. It is of special significance that many of the Conference meetings were held in the new Agronomy Building, Williams Hall. It is named in honor of the late Professor C. B. Williams —the man responsible for the organization of the Tobacco Workers' Conference. The group he organized more than thirty years ago, however, was called the Tobacco Research Committee — composed primarily of tobacco-project leaders in the Flue-cured tobacco-growing states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. The committee also included representatives from the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering, and the Extension Services. Mr. Williams served as permanent chairman of the committee...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1953

4 Grain Storage on Va. Farms, Marketing Biggest Problems By J. L. Maxton (Extension Agricultural Economist) In 1949, the Virginia Division of Markets, the Bureau of Agricultural Economics and the Virginia Experiment Station made a survey in Virginia to determine grain storage facilities and needs. At that time only 11.7 percent of the corn stored on farms was stored in rodent proof buildings. Eightyseven percent of the corn storages were of frame construction. In that same year there was off farm storage of only 6.5 million bushels for all grains. It was found that most farms had one or more cribs for storage of corn on the ear which was subject to rodent damage and to insect infestation. There were only limited facilities for storing small grain on farms. There was a great need, on many of the larger farms, with above average production of corn and small grain, for suitable storages for conditioning, fumigating, and turning shelled corn and small grain. It was found that most small...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1953

IITIT.Y. 1953 Picnics Started Each year during the summer most county - fin Bureau units enjoy a picnic. The Charles City-New Kent FB !.,pd the season last month with a "shad planking" held on the vonks of the Chickahominy River. 1 '* . Ms VALC Testimony (From front page) Road Builders Association —leading industry's delegation at the public hearing—said the use of convicts to construct highways amounted to "socialism" in a "vicious" form. He suggested that more of the prisoners be used in producing needed food for state institutions, saying that the state now owns. 20 million acres. This would amount to one prisoner for each 1.7 acres. The spokesman pointed out that the state made a profit on three farms last year and it "seems logical that it would be more efficient to put more (convicts) on farms." The Virginia Mineral Aggregates spokesman after following the same pattern used by other industry spokesmen of presenting figures as to the number of prisoners used in the field he was...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1953

JL (From front page) years gone by has been the forerunner of some of our worst depressions. An attendant evil is the enforced abandonment of soil building and improvement practices which causes severe losses in soil resources. Fields get thinner, gullies deeper, and hillsides that should be in legunes and grasses are taken over by briers, broom sage and scrub pine. Even the most eloquent advocate of soil conservation faces a well nigh impossible task in trying to persuade farmers to spend money conserving soil from which there seems small chance of earning a profit. While a properly managed price support program can mean much to farmers, we should not lose sight of the fact that improper management may prove very harmful. A guarantee, of a profitable price .for a bushel of wheat or a pound of tobacco does not necessarily mean a decent income for the farm family. If the price of wheat is fixed at a level which will permit foreign producers to take over our export outlets completely,...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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