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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

Farm Bureau 153, No. 4 New ag commissioner familiar with farmers' wants and needs fly NORM HYDE [t/FBF Broadcast Editor RlCHMOND—Virginia's new commis--11 oner of agriculture knows what farmers ivant. J. Carlton Courter 111 has lobbied the j( leneral Assembly Jbn behalf of farmers and related liusinesses since [1981 with the [Virginia Agribusiness Council, the same organization he became president of in 1987. Courter, 37, took J-Cartton Courter 111 office on April 11 after being named commissioner by Gov. George Allen April 1. Only one other Virginia commissioner of agriculture has been younger. Parke Brinkley was 34 when appointed by former Gov. John Battle in 1950. Raised on his parent's Amelia County dairy farm, Courter graduated from Virginia Tech in 1979 with a degree in dairy science. He spent two years as a fieldman for Dairymen, Inc. in the Roanoke area before joining the agribusiness council. He is a former director of the Virginia Council of Farmer Cooperatives and past pr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

2 Clean Water Act reauthorization poses challenge Reauthorization of the Clean Water Act poses one of the biggest challenges in farming we have ever faced. If leading Clean Water Act proposals now in Congress become law, farmers across Virginia will be forced to develop a water quality management plan approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. This plan will be a top-down, penalty-based approach that mandates farming practices, and will be enforced through criminal and civil penalties. This would seriously impair the way we operate our farms. These CWA provisions will differ significantly from conservation compliance provisions of the Farm Bill. In that 1985 act, farmers risked losing only farm program payments if they did not "voluntarily" develop and implement conservation compliance plans. Current CWA proposals in Congress are not voluntary. They demand that farmers develop management measures as dictat- Ed by their state. If farmers or state officials choose not to comply,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

May 1994 FB insurance company rewarded for quality By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor ALEXANDRIA —Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company has reached a milestone in its quest to provide the best quality service to its customers. The largest domestic insurance company in Virginia was recently named the winner of the U.S. Senate Productivity and Quality Award for Virginia in the private sector service category. "Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance has been about quality for 40 years," said its executive vice president, C.E. "Chuck" Clement. "But in 1990 we said we were going to prove it or improve it. This award is a carrot for the effort." The U.S. Senate Productivity and Quality Awards were established in 1982 by the U.S. Senate to encourage, promote and recognize productive business practices on a statewide level. The program's overall goal is to strengthen national competitiveness. Each year, states that participate in the program accept applications from companies in ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

4 Wmm 9 m irniniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinl^ ■"• '«wmtm*>-™ ■ w f~~~m '^ __. I I_i . I .•'■ Dodge Ram 5.9 L Magnum V-8 GET $500 CASH BACK Ram Wagops. And your castvßack is on OR Cinnn \A/fIRTH HF top of any other national offer.* Or if you Url <p IUUU wwlin I n ur . prefer, select up to $1,000 in quality DeWalt DEWALT TOOLS. tools. All you need is a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau before you see your It's looking like another good year for Dodge dealer. Cash back or DeWalt tools - American farmers. First we introduce the expect a record harvest. new Ram Pickup, "The Truck Of The Year" ... hh „ „ IHI h ~•. , B „ mm „ r ' This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 12/31/94. and accordinq to Motor Trend. And now the may not be used in combination with any other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or , ~ , , .... , . certain other special programs. Ask for restrictions and details. truck that changes all the rules also ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

May 1994 Three diverse businesses sign protection agreement RICHMOND—James River Corp., American Farmland Trust, and The Nature Conservancy recently signed a protection agreement. This agreement will permanently protect from development a piece of farmland that is considered the country's oldest under continuous cultivation and is also a critical Chesapeake Bay natural resource and wildlife area. AFT, a national nonprofit farmland conservation group based in Washington, D.C., and TNC, a national nonprofit conservation group dedicated to preserving biological diversity, will co-hold a permanent agricultural and natural areas conservation easement on the 1,800-acre farm known as Upper Brandon Plantation. The farm dates to at least 1616 and has been owned by James River Corp. since 1985. The easement provides for the perpetual maintenance of the form's agricultural productivity, natural resources and wildlife habitat, open space and other scenic qualities by the corporation or any subs...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

6 „«J? Llamas % I — useful, fun, profitable ~ t) Llama Association of the T % I Llamas as sentries # . . . # r . Alpacas and Llamas j Mid-Atlantic States produce fine fiber I f SiT Don't miss these llama a/\ May 28-29^1994 A brochure, "Learning jI Llamas can perform Culpeper Expo about Llamas", contact f Culpeper, Virginia f the L#A#M*A#S V I*4 \/\ © Avy Contact: Tom Reichert j I September 25 & 26, 1994 There are a number of other llama events JQ, llflmflQ ran hull parte Vir § ina State Fair Grounds to be held in Vir g inia and its surrounding y^\ P Richmond, Virginia states in the next year. LAMAS members •% #1 \ Contact: Dale Graham will be happy to let you know when they I+JT \ (703)937-4475 are and where they will take place. H Llamas for parades Llamas for packing and hiking Llamas are for sharing | The following farms would welcome your visits or inquiries and have llamas or alpacas for sale ALPACAS NORTHERN VIRGINIA Bennington Alpacas Cedar Knoll Hacienda de Paz S...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

May 1994 Trellises create interesting twists with climbing vines One of the surest ways to increase the efficiency and attractiveness of your garden space is by raising vines on trellises. Using trellises saves space and reduces fruit rot in the vegetable garden. When used effectively, trellises create special nooks among the ornamental plants in your landscape. Vining plants ascend by one of three methods. Climbing vines climb by spiral- ing and twining around any object small enough to embrace, even nearby plants. Climbers— also called twiners —include pole or runner beans, asparagus beans, and most of the annual flowering vines, for example, morning glories and black-eyed Susans. Clinging vines have short tendrils that cling to props. If encouraged occasionally, these plants will grow up alongside a fence or within a cage. The dingers include the tall varieties of gourds and peas. Other vine plants are so heavy or have so few tendrils that they need frequent training and tying. I...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

8 Rabbit breeders hopping into new commercial venture By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor MONTEREY—Herman Puffenbarger plans to make as much money on one rabbit as he did on one sheep. The Highland County beef cattle farmer has hopped into the commercial rabbit raising business, since he sheared his sheep flock out of existence last October. "Rabbits are easier to take care of," Puffenbarger explained. "And more profitable." He recently signed a contract with Kepco Foods Inc. in Moorefield, W.Va., a new specialty meats company. Puffenbarger will breed rabbits for the company, which in turn promises to buy the offspring for no less than 70 cents per pound. He bought 30 does by March, and planned to have 100 housed in his old sheep barn by August. When Puffenbarger first heard about Kepco's operation, he decided raising rabbits would be a sensible thing to do. "With sheep you only get paid once a year, but with rabbits you get money almost once a month," he said. Growers who have c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

May 1994 f Conservation plan compliance begins Jan. 1,1995 (Continued from Page 1) Other conservation practices include grass-based crop rotations and contour farming. Grass-based crop rotations occur when a farmer grows a cover crop of fescue or some other grass for several years and then for one year he grows a crop such as tobacco, in the same field. "I had a tobacco farmer tell me the other day that by rotating grass with his tobacco, he was able to reduce the cost of his irrigation because he didn't need as many irrigation systems," Norris said. Contour farming is when crop rows are planted across a slope instead of up and down it, Norris said. Virginia currently has 40,000 conservation compliance plans for 1.25 million acres of highly erodible farmland. "We've worked hard to ensure the plans are cost-effective and economical," Norris said. "We feel most of the practices in these plans will put money in the farmer's pocket down the road." But farmers can't wait to implement the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

10 Sometimes You Find The Answer ,( In The Strangest f \ Places! Who would ever think of looking in a / \ * 1j ' Farm Bureau office for the answer to f their health insurance needs? / f $1,700 X? j- ( Savings )y Mrs. V.S. of Russell County, Va. did — and she found the answer: L V "I saved over $1,700 in annual premiums." So did more than 25,000 Virginians — and they found the answers to their health insurance problems. We know the average American is finding it tough to find adequate health insurance and to pay his medical bills. That's why the VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU has teamed up with BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD OF VIRGINIA to offer several health insurance programs designed to fit your needs. SO CHECK US OUT IF YOUR PROBLEM IS OR IF YOU WANT • I don't have health insurance • Wide range of coverage in and • Insurance costs too much out of the hospital • Insurance I have doesn't give • Savings on your health insurance me good coverage • Prescription drug coverage • Doctor and hospital ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

May 1994 When cooking out, make sure inside's cooked Longer days and warmer evenings find more of us heading out of the kitchen to cook dinner on the grill. It can also mean chances are greater for meat and poultry to sit around unrefngerated while you're setting the picnic table or lighting the grill. In the danger zone between 40 F and 140 F, bacteria on food can multiply rapidly without you even real- •/ izing it since you cant see, smell or taste bacteria. Don't let unsafe food handling practices spoil your meal —a few precautions can help prevent harmful bacterial growth. The emphasis on teaching the public how to handle raw meat and poultry safely has become a national issue since the fatal outbreaks of food poisoning attributed to E coli in ground beef occurred last year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has mandated that all raw meat and poultry products carry safe handling instructions on the label. All ground meat and poultry products must be labeled with safe han...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

12 Two-year ag students can transfer limited number of credits BLACKSBURG—A recent decision by Virginia Tech permits students who complete courses in the two-year Agriculture Technology Program to transfer a limited number of credit hours into the four-year bachelor's degree program within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. "This policy will give those students who first enter the [two-year] program with an associate's degree as a goal, and who later change their career goals to seek a bachelor's Cattlemen reminded to correctly inject medications Although most cattle producers know to inject their animals with medications twice a year, a reminder never hurts. "We just want to make sure we get the word out to cattlemen about correctly injecting their cattle," said Spencer Neale, assistant director of Commodity/ Marketing for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "Some are still not injecting them properly." Neale said that all medicines have instructions on how to inject th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

May 1994 Agricultural pesticide regulations delayed until Jan. 1 By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor WASHINGTON—Congress has agreed to delay implementation of new agricultural worker pesticide regulations from April 15,1994 to Jan. 1,1995. Hie emergency legislation was requested by Farm Bureau and the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. Only a few provisions of the pending regulations will go into effect this growing season. "Farmers were scrambling to learn about the new regulations just weeks before they were to go into effect," explained C. Wayne Ashworth, president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "Since the EPA failed to provide training funds or materials to state officials charged with spreading the word to farmers, we felt a delay was justified. "Farm Bureau in no way opposes the goal of a safer workplace for farm work- Farm Bureau women want to educate public about agriculture Too often, people don't understand what members of Farm Bureau Women's...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined SeptVOct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the DecVJan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

May 1994 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 14) WANTED—oId Virginia postcards with postage stamps and xjstmarked before 1930.703-948-4622, after dark. 'LASTIC POTS—I-gallon slightly used, good condition, $.08. >jantity discounts. J. M. Moseiey, 1-800-791-5414, Dißwyn. WANTED—Mane Fort Apache toy soldier playsets from the 19505, 60s and 70s. 703-943-1884. r IREWOOD PROCESSOR—three-phase electric, six-part wedge, conveyors, hydraulics, log deck and cutoff saw. 804-634-9719. OAK KITCHEN CABINET—flour sifter and bin, metal bread drawer, accordion door refinished, excellent, $650.703-988-5711. ORGAN —like new, unlimited sound, double keyboard, walnut jabinet, roll top with key. 804-492-4404. IRRIGATION HONDO PUMP—eight H.P., 3-inch, 40-foot hose, opt valve, excellent condition. 804-798-4406. WANTED —New Hermes Engraver. Parts, pieces, supplies. ■ 16 Mahlon Dr. Winchester, Va. 22603-3543,703-877-2840. MAIL BOX SIGNAL —you know when the mail man has run without going to mai...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1994

| I "**"■ ''' 5 HpP -■ * v I ■L- f J J it 1 I I 1 I I •J 111 1 I I I I I I I V I I ■ri I ■ r • §; Vol 53, No. 4 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS May 1994 J*** i « ■, M, ... - JBLJIL . 4 ; *. w y»~? * r.«»«« - - §11 IIBP ..;: I 44fflS% MJJM MTfi m KIH a ■?!?■ 3 H O ,|"'.ift B / yVVBI MttK GREG HICKS/FBN KATMY DIXOfWBN Spring: Time for new beginnings With warmer weather finally arriving after a violent winter, April meant spring in many parts of Virginia. In left photo, M.L. Everett Jr. of Capron in Southampton County busily plants corn on part of the Everett's diversified operation. To help preserve the soil and to guard against runoff, the Everetts utilize the no-till method of planting. That is, the soil is not tilled before planting, and previous vegetation remains in place around the corn. Everett farms with his dad, Marvin L. Everett, a Virginia Farm Bureau Federation board member. At right, a calf takes a break from grazing on a sunny day in Fluvanna County. ML jf...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

Farm Bureau Vol 53, No. 5 New labor restrictions could force out H-2A ag workers By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor KENBREDGE—New restrictions by the I department of Labor on its H-2A temporary foreign agricultural worker program could put some farmers out of business. The H-2A program creates a special, nonimmigrant status so that foreign workers may work temporarily for U.S. farmers if there are not enough American workers to fill the job openings. Beginning June 1, tobacco and produce growers who use H-2A laborers will have to fire H-2As if a crew of American workers request working for them. The new rules require growers to keep groups of American workers together, even if it means firing their foreign workers. And under the old regulations, farmers are required to offer employment to an H-2A worker on at least three-fourths of the workdays specified in his contract, or the farmer has to pay the amount the worker would have earned for the guaranteed number of days. This coul...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

2 Foreign trade vote historic Congress soon will take an historic vote to accept or reject the recently negotiated world trade agreement. The agreement, which establishes new FARM FOCUS American Farm Bureau Federation trade disciplines for 121 participating nations, is set to go into effect in July 1995. Is it a good trade agreement for U.S. farmers? If s likely the best trade agreement the U.S. could hope to get and one we certainly cant refuse. The alternative to approving it is to turn toward protectionism—a move that would damage U.S. agriculture. The nation's farmers and rural America depend on foreign trade. Exports account for the production from nearly one of every three acres of U.S. cropland and almost 20 percent ofthe nation's total farm production. The added demand strengthens farm prices and boosts the efficiency of every farm in America. The new agreement reverses the European Union's (EU) push toward higher export subsidies— the first significant decline in nearly a d...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

June 1994 May 31-June 1: Mid-Atlantic Aquaculture Conference, Fredericksburg Sheraton Inn. Contact Robins Buck, VDACS aquaculture development manager, 804-371-6094. June 1: The Wonderful World of Miniature Horses Theme Park opens weekdays, Wednesday through Saturday, 10 am.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. U.S. Route 29, Madison. Call 703-948-4000 for information and rates. June 1-3: Chesapeake Bay Research Conference, Norfolk Waterside Marriott Hotel, Norfolk. Call the Chesapeake Research Consortium at 410-326-6700 for information. June 2-3: Estate Planning for Forest Landowners seminar, Blacksburg. Contact Dr. Harry Haney, Virginia Tech, 703-231-5212. i W*r\ 1 June 3-5: Harborfest Festival, Norfolk Call 804-627-5329. June 4: Ashland Strawberry Fair. Contact Maiy Claire Coster, 804-798-8289. June 4-5: 13th Annual Virginia Wineries Festival, Great Meadow Field Events Center, the Plains, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For festival information, call 1-800-277-COKK June 4-5: Virginia Arabian Horse Ass...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1994

4 IMUjllljl " - >frx r ~^* Sssr "^ Dodge Ram 5.9 L Magnum V-8 GET $500 CASH BACK Ram Wagons. And your cash back is on OR cmnn \A/fIRTH OF *°P of ar| y ottier national offer.* Or if you Un «p IUUU VVUn I n ur prefer, select up to $1,000 in quality DeWalt • DEWALT TOOLS tools ' A "you need is a cert^icate from y° ur state's Farm Bureau before you see your It's looking like another good year for Dodge dealer. Cash back or DeWalt tools - American farmers. First we introduce the expect a record harvest. new Ram Pickup, "The Truck Of The Year" ... hh „ „ .Mf „ mm „ ii/r t ~i a j u This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 12/31/94, and according to Motor Trend. And now the may not be used'in combination with any other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or , i .1 x i .1 ,i . . certain other special programs. Ask for restrictions and details. truck that changes all the rules also comes with a special $500 cash incentive. sin® Available...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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