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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Correspondence. TREATMENT OF SKIPTON NAVVIES. (TO THE EDITOR.) [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

TREATMENT OF SKIPTON NAVVIES. (to the editor.) Sir,—I, with my fellows, wish to make a strong protest concerning the way we navvies have been treated at the Skipton end of that line at the station yard. Out of nine weeks we have only had five weeks ! and two days' work, earning on an aver age about 30s per week. Most of us have two homes to keep and large families. What I wish to say is that we might have been employed nearly all the time bad officers done their duty. The trouble is that wheu the horses and drays cannot work on the cuttings and banks after heavy rain, about 15 men have to.stand idle until the ground dries enough to get on to it again. This is where all the loss of time comes in, when there should surely be plenty of work about the sta tion to employ us. Other gangs along the line have full time ; but this is the way we at this end have been treated. A lot of us might have been employed quarrying and raising stone in the cut tings. We cannot blame the ganger, for he ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

Indian MEW 1915 MODELS. 4-h.p. Single-cylinder Models, spring 3| h.p. Twins - - - - j861 7-h.p. Twins - - - - £68 Nine Prominent Improvements on 1915 Models. Write to-day for Illustrated Catalog, for warded post free. iSEY BICYCLE DEPOT Sole District ^gent, 123 Sturt St., Ballarat Tel. 505. Opp. Post Office. - B ? *i PUPfP^if® Hf CffllfiiAPQ HI Why not have a good, per i 111 II (iHfilll Hi pUfiilyl ^ H? manent enlarged photo m graph by the Famous Bal :i Leafiiii fir the Froi! @ SS1S ■ We are making quite a ! number. Photographs are a Necessity— Not a Luxury. j THE PRICES ARE VERY REASONABLE. i Frame, Price. Solid 20/ 3 in. oak 25/ and gilt slip. 30/ j| BRIDil Ta PORTRAITS. 'I The RICHARDS & CO. Studios are'Jfotpous throughout Australia for their ,'K beautiful Wedding Photographs, our ROYAL PANEL. 10 X 8 size, being un ■ equalled for style and quality. ^ Bridal j^ouquets, Wreaths, Buttonholes, «kc.,.. :'.t the latest styles keytr at-studio.- >; | RICHARDS & CO.'S B...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Municipal Amalgamation. POSITION OF SCARSDALE BOROUGH. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

POSITION OF SCARSDALE BOROUGH. Enquiries were made by Cr Station at Monday night's meetiug of the Scars dale Borough Council if any word had been received from Mr Haglethorn about the Borough being absorbed by Grenvillo | Shire. The Town Clerk : !No. Cr Statton : He moved that the town clerk write to the department, and ascer tain what was the position of tne Scars dale Borough Council. IE they were to be absorbed by the Shire—as it was stated in the press they were to be—they should like to know the representation they wore to get in the new riding. Cr Edgar: They should give three months' notice. The Town Clerk : That has already been given. Cr Crosthwaifce: He seconded the motion. He heard that the Bunninyong Borough Council was in the same posi tion as they were, and that the whole of the members of the Borough Council sat with the Shire Council, and would do so for 12 months, after which the whole council would retire, and a new council be formed. The Town Clerk suggested that ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

" Tell me, Mary, bow to woo thee, Teach iny bosom to unfold Language which ean soothe and cheer thee, When thou hnsfc a cough or cold. But if pleading cannot gain thee, I'll invoke an aid more sure ; E'en a qaeen could not disdain me Offering Woods' Great Peppermint Care.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Methodist Centenary. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

Last Sunday, 15th August, was ob served by the Methodist Church of Vic toria as Centenary Sunday. It was on 10th August, 1815, that a young minis ter named Samuel Leigh was sent from England bv the British Wesleyan Chuich. to take a pastoral oversight of the 19 Methodists in the colony of New South Wales. At that time there was a population, of 20,000 people, mostly con victs. The Government had provided chaplains to accompany a transport, and these settled amongst the colonists, dis charging magisterial as well as minis terial duties, which gave them an unique but scarely satisfactory position. One of the chaplains, the Rev. Samuel Mardsen, by the permission of Governor Macquarie, made a very creditable move ment in the interests of the childreu, and obtained a schoolmaster from London. It happened that the man appointed, by name Thomas Bowden, was a Methodist ■who brought with him not only his teaching qualifications, but his Methodist traditions. He found that a Methodist day mee...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Sad Case. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

A Sad Case. The worried countenance of the bridegroom disturbed the best man. Tiptoeing up the aisle, he whispered: "What's the matter, Jock? Hae ye lost the ring?" "No," blurted the unhappy Jock, "the ring's safe eno'. But, mon, I've lost ma enthusiasm."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Epigram. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

An Epigram. "That wasn't a bad epigram on the magistrate's part," said the somewhat educated tramp who had been con victed for vagrancy. "What did he say?" asked the tramp's pal. "Seven days," came the reply. "That ain't no epigram, is it?" "I'm sure it is. I once asked a par son what an epigram was, and he says 'It's a short sentence that sounds light, but gives you plenty to think about.'" The other day a German professor in America explained—to his own sat isfaction, at any rate—why Great Britain had so many fine colonies. This is what he said: — "It is too wonder England has so many colonies. Look how she got them. It's the system. England, you know, would send an expedition head ed by a missionary to some outland ish tropical place or other. The mis sionary would disembark on the white beach. He would gather the natives together under a palm, and, holding up his hand, he would say, 'Let us prav.' Then, while the na tives had their eyes 6hut in pious prayer, up would go the Engl...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"WE EAT 'EM ALIVE." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

"WE EAT 'EM ALIVE." Many letters convey the informa tion that the Turks are mortally afraid of falling into the hands of Austra lasians, becouse they believe they are cannibals. That there is some ground for this fear is conveyed in a letter from Sergeant Bert Fitz-Patrick, of the 7th A.S.C., to his sister, Mrs. Ber gin, of Penshurst:— "i am in. great niuk. There's great fun here. A lot of the Turks think we are cannibals! Our mob always sing while they are fighting 'We Bat 'Em Alive! We Drink Buckets of Blood!"'

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
War Census. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

^ The following communication, accom panied by specimen forms, has been for warded by the Attorney-General (Mr W. M. Hughes):— I am sending you herewith specimens of the War Census cards. These will be available at every postal and postal receiving office throughout Australia, and it will be the duty of every person who,- by the War Census Act, is re quired to render a return, to obtain the proper form and to post the same to the I Commonwealth Statistician, Melbourne. All the persons in any household may use the one envelope, and an envelope can be obtained at any post office for transmitting the cards post free. Any male of age 18 and of any greater age less than 60 years must fill up and transmit a " Personal Card." Every person of 18 years and upwards who is i in receipt of any income, or who possesses any property, or who is both in receipt of income and has property, must fill up an "Income aad Wealth Card." In formation will be given later as to the duties of trustees, compan...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Call to the Colors! RECRUITS WANTED. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

RECRUITS WANTED. Victoria requires an average of 80 re cruits daily to reinforce. Victorians at the front. Minimum height... 5 feet 2 inches •Age ... ... 18 to 45 years Chest measurement (fully expanded) ... 33 inches Persons desiring to enlist should, if in the metropolitan area, apply at the recruiting depot at military headquart ers, and if in other localities at the near est town hall, shire hall, drill hall, or re cruiting depot, where arrangements will be made for medical examination. Free railway tickets to the metropolis will be granted after medical examina tion. Rates of Pay per Day. After Embarkation Before (including Embarkation, deferred pay). Lieutenant ... 18s 6d 21s Sergeant ... 10s 10s 6d Corporal ... 93 10s Private ... 5s 6s Separation Allowance. Separation allowance will be paid to married men who are receiving less than 8s per day, but such allowance will not exceed the amount necessary to make up the difference between their daily rate of pay and 8s per day. Sub...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HIT IN FIVE PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

HIT IN FIVE PLACES. The following is an extract from a letter written to his mother in Adam inaby by Private Ernie M'Laughlin, from Malta, on June 4: — "I will be out of the hospital in » few days, I expect. My wounds are all healing up splendidly. Another big batch of wounded came in to-day from the Dardanelles. I got wounded on the 19 th of last month, at 6 o'clock in the morning. The Turks attacked at 2 o'clock, but we drove them off. They came on again at 3 a.m., and we let them come on to within 10 yards of the trench, and then we let them have it. Our fellows were laugh ing and saying, 'This is better than football.' We mowed them down in thousands. It was very weird. They were blowing bugles and singing out, 'Allah! Allah!' for all they were worth. We only had about 500 casualties, /hilst they had 12,000 or 13,000. Twelve thousand Turkish rifles were picked up on our side of the line next 1 day. It was daylight at 6 o'clock, and I was getting up higher so that I could have a ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WRITING WITH LEFT HAND. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

WRITING WITH LEFT HAND. Private D. H. Souter, writing to liis father, Mr. D. G. Souter, tlie well known artist, tells a picturesque story in a letter from Birmingham: — "Have been travelling for tlie last three weeks," he says, "and am now writing with my left hand, because a Turk, who was no gentleman, and a poor shot, got me in the right arm— both arms, in fact—though it only grazed the left arm and broke one bone in the right." My tunic sleeve stopped the bullet, but not until it had got its dirty work in. It is doing well now. "The fact that the 3rd disregarded discipline when they charged up the 1 hill after the memorable landing was their salvation. "We landed just after them. Just as we got up we were ordered to reinforce the firing line, and as we were being shelled a dozen or so of us decided to get to where we could hit back. We made a rush, and as we got to the top of the hill we got it good and solid. The firing line was still 50 yards further on. I was the only one to r...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WILD WHITE MEN. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

THE WILD WHITE MEN. Lieut. Fitzpatrick, writing to his father, Mr. Fitzpatrick, M.L.A., says— "The hills are so steep that ropes have had to be fixed so that you can pull yourself up—and these are the hills our boys hunted the Turks from with the bayonet. It is a beautiful place.; the hills and valleys are just like the Blue Mountains, just as high, and covered with small scrub. Just think of our boys storming the Blue Mountains with the bayonet and carry ing their heavy packs. Take your hat off to every one who was in that mad charge. We have lost some men, but we have made history. The Turks have a wholesome dread of our boys, calling them the wild white men. It can easily be seen that they have no heart in their work; it is only the German officers who drive them on to fight in sheer desperation."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CERMAN'S SLIM TRICK. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

GERMAN'S SLIM TRICK. Private R. Freeman writes from Helowan Hospital, Egypt: — "I am one of the lucky ones, for out of our company Ave have only 80 left. I don't think it will be long be fore we have the Turks beaten. It is only the German officers who keep them from giving in, and they shoot any man who attempts to surrender. A German officer got into our trench on the night we landed, and was giv ing orders to cease fire, as there were Indians coming up on our left. We did not know whether there were In dians or not on the peninsular. We i ceased firing, and .the colonel of the 1th Battalion and the adjutant got jout of the trench and shook hands with them. We soon discovered that the so-called Indians were Turks. They took the adjutant prisoner, but we opened fire, killing nearly all of them. We also shot the German offi cer in the trench with us. I am here suffering with rheumatism, but hope to be back in the trenches soon."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Circumstances Alter Cases. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

Circumstances Alter Cases. As a furniture van was standing in a suburban thoroughfare, a little boy offered one of the horses some bread to eat. The driver looked on approvingly. "That's right," he said, "always bf> kind to dumb animals. Look how the old horse enjoys it. But does your mother always give you big hunks of bread and butter like that?" "No," replied the youngster, "Moth er didn't give me this; I found it ly ing in the van." "Wot!" yelled the driver. "Why, you young imp, that's my breakfast!" Silence would improve some peo ple's conversation.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

III. After the first few weeks Ralph be gan to have a curious conception of the scenery of Jersey. If he strolled out from the French windows of the boarding-house he saw —a couple of garden chairs on the lawn, in one of which was seated the loveliest vision of womanhood he had ever beheld. If he took a walk along the promen ade, a fairyland scene opened before his gaze—the same beautiful woman, sitting beneath a silk sunshade upon a seat overlooking the beach. Taking' an excursion by brake to the famous Plemont Caves, he had a magnificent view of—the queen of wo men, seated upon a rock in the en trance to the caves. Everywhere he went there was but on view in Jersey worth looking at— and it wore a skirt and blouse, or some other form of feminine costume. Now, when a man reaches this stage, two paths seem to stretch be fore him. One leads to a lunatic asy lum and the other to the altar. Tem perament or circumstances may decide which path he will take, but he has got to go ahead some...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Quite Hardened. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

1 I Quite Hardened. If it is true that a Britisher's house j is his castle, it is eve>n truer of a flat. I A flat lias only one entrance if it is not on the ground floor, and can be | held aganst almost any odds. But j there are some things you can't keep j out, and one of them is sound—espe > cially from the flat below. • Young Tutpipple lived in solitary state in a flat. Below him lived an other hermit named Quarter, who j was struggling hard and painfully to ! master the cornet. Up to now the cornet has had decidedly the best of it. I Everybody residing within a mile and a-half of the persevering Quarter ; suffered untold agonies eighteen ; hours of the twenty-four; but Tutpip ; pie came off nuch the worst of all. | Some hint of the general feeling of brooding discontent must have reach ed Quarter, for he called on Tutpip ple last Friday. , "Do you find that my constant • practising makes you nervous?" he asked, diffidently. "Oh, no," answered the sufferer. "At least, not n...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DUCKING AND SIDE-STEPPING. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

■ DUCKING AND SIDE-STEPPING. I Constable Pattinson, who holds the ranks of sergeant-major in the Expedi tionary Forces at the Dardanelles, has written to Constable Twiss. "We have been hard at it ever since we landed. There is plenty of fighting both day and night, and we are now getting accustomed to being under shrapnel fire, which is called Turkish Delight by our fellows. We have to be good at side-stepping and ducking when a Turkish shell comes along. We saw the •Triumph' sunk by a torpedo from a submarine; Near ly all of us have long beards. It's hardly worth while shaving. I often see Dave Pheeney and M'Cristal, of our station. They are battling along well, and, according to the fashion, set here, sport long whiskers. Give my best wishes to Inspector Stephen, the non-coms., and the men at No. 4." '

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Followed Instructions. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

Followed Instructions. "Gracious, man!" exclaims the doc tor, when Mr. Glubbins calls him in a hurry. "Your temperature is rioting along near the danger point, and you "And I'm worse off than I ever was before, all through the diet you pre scribed." "Impossible, Mr. Glubbins. I told you distinctly to confine yourself to such foods as would be taken by a three-year-old child." "And didn't I follow orders? I ate applecores and dog-biscuits and ends of burnt n;atches and scraps of po tato peeling and everything else I could pick up while no one was look ing, and here I am, pretty near dead!" Hastily reflecting upon the gastron omical tendencies of the average three-year-old child, the doctor, tells | Mr. Glubbins that he has been over J doing the diet, and will have to sub ; sist on soft toast and hot water for a i week. i '

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STORIES FROM TURKEY. THE FIGHTING THIRTEENTH. Blown Up By Turks. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 21 August 1915

j STORIES FROM TURKEY. j THE FIGHTING THIRTEENTH. Blown Up By Turks. From Lance-Corporal J. H. Sorrell, to liis brother, W. A. Sorrell: — "Up till June 1 matters had been very quiet for some time. Our bat talion was stationed on a hill. Some of us Avere lying on the side of the path near the top. Somehow, I was restless and couldn't stop. About 3 a.m. I lifted my head and looked to the top. The moment I did there was an awful roar, and earth and flame in great quantities shot high up into the air. It was like an eartn quake. The Turks had undermined and blown up the hill. This shock sent me and many others rolling down the hill amid showers of clods, smoke and fumes. Momentarily we were senseless. We soon pulled our selves together and got back again into the thick of it. As soon as the explosion occurred tha enemy charged our trenches, and many got into them. Simultaneously came bombs and grenades amongst our men, who fixed their bayonets and stood their ground, with the result tha...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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