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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

ar ? w 'P'iyp jwpffflfw f The Indjan Advocate. 168 grQWth of a perfect sentiment. Sentiment being that natural, tender apprehension which God has given us for our hand maid in matters of faith, unless the faith be to begin with, absolutely whole, the sentiment must be imperfect, must be stinted. There is no stinting the human sentiment in the Catholic heart, when that heart is in Catholic communion with the truths of God. Outside the Church there is stinting, there is timidity, there is the clipping of the wings of love by impaired faith; but to the Catholic who is the child of Mary, the sentiment is quite as perfect while being, also, besides natural, supernatural as is the perfect rest of a Christian child in its mother's arms. And just as the child's sentiment, which lasts him through his life, always consecrates the whole of his after-natural piety, so all the Catholic sentiment of de votion to the Mother of God consecrates the whole sentiment of the Catholic life. The second do...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

l(SifWig5if5P 169 The Indian Advocate. " "VHwraHMHn is no suspension of the Catholic Communion of Saints. Not for one single moment is there separation of the departed soul from the souls of those he has loved or lived with on earth; for their prayers go with him, go for him, go to him, as he journeys with his Angel to beatitude, or to a place where he will be made perfect for beatitude. And as, too, the prayers of the departed soul are being continually offered for his friends on earth even his sufferings, if he have any, may be offered for them supreme and perfect charity possesses his soul, just as Catholic charity possesses their souls on his be half. One Communion of Saints holds all souls; one faith, one hope, one suffering, one bliss, binds all souls together in the Christian Church Heaven, Purgatory, Earth, being three states, three places, but combined in spiritual unity by all good Catholics. There is, therefore, no separation from the Catholic dead. The body, indeed, sanc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

apnT1 v&ygfi'iffiK'&Pf&Z1 The Indian Advocate. 170 ' ' ,.; ? - V But to the non-Catholic a Christian's death is very differ ent. The dead body is all that is left to sorrowing friends. No holy Mass, no prayers for the dead, no Communion of Saints, no holy certainty of the perfect accord of the living departed with the purest wishes and aspirations of those on earth, no tranquil joy of one faith or of one knowledge for all the members of the one Family of God, whether in Heaven or in Purgatory, or on earth, can comfort the thoroughly crushed hearts of Protestant mourners, who have nothing but a dead body for their consolation. For these reasons they fall back upon sentiment, since fajth is to them but pious sen timent. They keep the dead body for many days. They cover the coffin with flowers mere sentiment. They hold Memorial Services mere sentiment. They wear broad black hat bands or much crape mere sentiment. They indulge freely in what Shakespeare called "inky suits an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

r ATBJTTrrr 'wTpjr-t. -Mrwn y fT 171 The Indian Advocate. r ttrt I i tion of Catholic knowledge. No dreaminess, no speculation, no dubitation, but the absolute certainty of Catholic truth which is God's truth; such is the earthly foretaste of the King--dom of God; and from this foretaste comes the flower of Catholic sentiment. We may respect, we may even reverence that kindly sentiment, which non-Catholics have put in the place of substantial truth; and since they are indebted to the Catholic Church for this kindly sentiment, just as they are in debted to the Catholic Church for all they know, we may hope it may lead them on to better things; yet never let it be sup posed for one single moment that mere sentiment can usurp the place of Catholic faith, since sentiment, to be true, must be built solely on Catholic faith, just as the Catholic faith is built solely on Divine Teaching. A. F. Marshall. SCANDAL OF PARENTS. Careless fathers and mothers, do you ever reflect on the terrible w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

flTSw & ' - ! Thf Indian Advocate. 172 THE CHURCH IN GERMANY DURING THE PAST CENTURY. 'A r, ( ' K frv Q mpmmmmmmw "i" continued from may number. The Pope declaied mixed marriages as not permissible, though valid, and admonished the clergy to discourage them and to do allv in their power to bring up the children as Cath olics. The Government did Tiot agree with this so-called inter ference of the Pope and bishops. After further disputes and opposition, tire Archbishop of Cologne was sent to prison in 1837. This daring act produced more sensation than the wholesale imprisonment of bishops by Napoleon. Then the Government tried to force the Catholic priests to perform mixed marriages. The Archbishop of Gnesen-Posen issued a pastoral forbidding them, and in 1839 this holy bishop was also imprisoned. Mourning was the order in all the churches; organs were silent and no bells were tolled. The whole Church was proud of these two "Confessors." Even from America came letters of admiratio...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

173 The Indian Advocate. V: w one hundred years, a provincial council was convened at Cologne. During the revolutions of 1 1848-49 the Catholics stood steadfast by the King, and might well be proud when he afterwards declared: "The maintenance of my throne is due to the fidelity of my Catholic subjects." The German Bishops assembled at Wurzburg and ad dressed a letter to the Governments asking for complete free dom in the education of youth and of candidates for the priest hood, free communication with Rome and with their flocks, and control of their own finances. Since 1803 the -State had kept the purse of the Church. In 1866 Austria and the remainder of Germany separated. This remainder was made up of a large number of Independ ent States, which were all united under the new Protestant German empire created by Bismarck, at Versailles in 1870. Bismarck's own position grew in consequence of this act; he was made Imperial Chancellor, a position provided with almost royal power. So fa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

The Indian Advocate. 174 THE GHOST DANCE. THE CEREMONY. The dance commonly begins about the middle of the afternoon or later, after sundown. When it begins in the afternoon, there is always an intermission of an hour or two for supper. The announcement is made by the criers, old men who assume this office apparently by tacit understanding, who go about the camp shouting in a loud voice to the people to prepare for the dance. The preliminary painting and dress ing is usually a work of about two hours. When all is ready, the leaders walk out to the dance place, and facing inward, join hands so as to form a small circle. Then, without mov ing from their places, they sing the opening song, according to previous agreement, in a soft undertone. Having sung it through once they raise their voices to their full strength and repeat it, this time slowly circling around in the dance. The step is different from that of most" other Indian dances, but very simple, the dancers moving from right to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

TliiMfftliirrfi- fhAiia1tf t rlJffflSfrtiTr, aanrriM

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

l" Thk Indian AnvocATK. 176 more especially after the trances have begun, the dancers un clasp handa andi sit down, to- smoke or talk for a few minutes. At such times the leaders sometimes deliver short addresses or sermons, or relate the recent trance experience of the dan cer. In holding each other's hands the dancers usually inter twine the fingers instead of grasping the hand as with us. Only an Indian could keep the blanket in place as they do under such circumstances. Old. people hobbling along with sticks, and little children hardly past the toddling period, sometimes form a part of the circle, the more vigorous dan cers accommodating the movement to. their weakness. Fre quently a. woman will be seen to joint the circle with an infant upon, hei back and. dance with the others, but should she show the least sign, of approaching excitement watchful friends lead her away that no harm may come to the child. Dogs are driven off: from the neighborhoods the circle lest they should r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

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Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

S!r?wrm"r -ttt ipr-f Twyw7TyTjpwf - Tin: Indian Advocatk. 178 w rionsly decorated. In the southern plains, however, only the Kiowa seem ever to have followed this method, they some times dancing around a cedar tree. On breaking the circle at the end of the dance the performers shook their blankets or shawls in the air, with the idea of driving away all evil influ ences. On later instructions from the messiah all hen went down to bathe in the stream, the men in one place and the women in another, before going to their tipis. The idea ot washing away evil things, spiritual as well as earthly, by bathing in running water is too natural and universal to need comment. The peculiar ceremonies ot prayer and invocation, with the laying on ot hands and the stroking of the face and body, have several times been described and need only be mentioned here. As ttance visions became frequent the subjects strove to imitate what they had seen in the spirit world, especially where they had taken part...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

'fJPfflSBWtVIWri'-'rrr Krtr- T 7T"hV' 179 Thk Indian Advocate. ' "i IW THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. PUniiTHIIKI) IV 1118 IIHNKDICI'INK KATIIKHN OK SACKED HEART MISSION, OKLAHOMA. A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the H"'y Rosary, St Michael and St. Benedict. Approved hy Rt. Rev. Theo. Meerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian TerritorieV '1'KKMN OK HITJJHOKIll'IOXl Single Copies 1 5c. Annual , Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. , . .75c Foreign Si. 25. I'.ntcrcd as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart. Oklahoma. , mtiviriTCmsMi 1. cry Suhscriber and Benefai tor will participate :n all the merits, prayers and iiond uorks of the Religions of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn Hi'fih Mass is sung every l'irt Tridaj of the month in Honor of th- Sarred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. . A Com entual Mass is offered eery I'irst Saturday of the mouth for our departed I'riends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Kery ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

?" $? fW!9s,r,'i'V!yrs'?,r "."' ,,'"'r;rr'" v -,v , ", ir-y r' , Thi Indian Advoiwtr. io A qoou life leads to a pood death, and. a good death-leads to eternal life and bliss beyond the grave. X X Thk crucifixes have been removed from the public schools in the Philippines, but the Protestant version of the Bible re mains in the public schools in the United States. Why is this discrimination made? Why are there two weights and two measures? X X liNci.vsi) is finding out that Mr. Kruger was right when he said that to conquer the Boers it would have to pay a price that would stagger humanity. It has already lost by death 15,000 soldiers, has about 80,000 more invalided, paid out already, in direct expenditures for the war, $755,000,000, and is not yet at the end of the price. If only the suffering and the loss had been confined to Chamberlain, Rhodes, Milner & Co.! X X Acuivm.im), the Kritipunan half-breed, was hatdly waim in Manila betote he had signed a proclamation to the Filipin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

k m mm ' ui.T- 183 - The Indian Advocatk. ing bodies of governmental aid the conditions would not ex ist. This, too, in face of the fact that the government vio lated a sacred obligation of contract to effect the change. Never forget that. Because the connivery and thievery of the sectarian could not compete with the Catholic, bigotry made it compulsory to even the score by withdrawing all aid. Of the 24,451 Indian childreu enrolled in the schools, 2435 are in Catholic hands. Catholics will find accommoda tions for all their own and Catholic funds will be forthcoming. If' Thus is the problem solved for the Catholic children. But what will the government do? The Church Progress. VWSAMMm A. M. I). G. We have received the following from the Sisters of St. Joseph with request for publication: "The Sisters of the Congregation of St. Joseph of the Archdiocese of Chicago" observe the pious custom of offering up to the Sacred Heart of Jesus all their prayers, mortifications, good works, spe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

- i lipjj p mwr" 'Ppi f The Indian Advocate. 184 A DROP OF BLOOD. A SINGULAR STORY AN'I) A OREVT LESSON. Jean Mathieu Savergne, a journeyman tiler, residing in Paris, in a narrow street of the quarter known as Menilmont ant, became ill very suddenly on the 20th of May, 1879, and no longer left his bed. His daughter, a good pious girl of fourteen years, served him devotedly, and his son Edward, every evening on returning from his day's toil, came and bent over his father's bed, but went away with a sad heart. Pere Jean Mathieu was dying of some hitherto unknown malady a malady that he had contracted in 1871, during the reign of the Commune. From that fatal epoch the poor sufferer was every moment or two putting his hand lo his right temple. He declared that he felt a sharp pain in that spot, but in vain his children ex amined the place indicated they saw nothing indicative of sore or wound. The skin was smooth and healthy, and yet poor Jean Mathieu, day and night, passed and repassed...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

w"?mrmiig"Tr v 185 " The Indian Advocate. to be an Anarchist, and assisted at all their public meetings. It was almost a miracle that Elise, amid such surroundings, remained a good Christian. One night Jean Mathieu appeared to be in great dread of something terrible, and incessantly struck his forehead. A cold sweat broke out over his whole frame. Edward proposed going for a doctor. "It is of no use," replied the old man, "no doctor can cure me. I am lost, lost!" After a few moments' silence he continued: "Edward, have you a knife?" "Yes, father." Come here and look just above my eye don't you see a red spot? Take it away, Edward, my son; scrape off the skin, cut it, slice it out. Oh it is horrible what I am enduring from that red spot!" "Father, there is nothing there," said Edward, and bade his sister bring a looking-glass to prove it. Jean Mathieu seized the glass with both hands. "Fathei, you have fever," suggested Elise. "It is that which torments you." "The poor patient clutch...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

The Indian Advocate. 186 "Come close to me," said Jean, v Edward and Elise approached close to the dying man. The latter laid her hand on her father's brow, and the soft touch seemed to calm him a little, and he told his children: "I was on guard at Roquette, about eight years ago, and was suddenly summoned to assist at an execution of hostages. I joined my comrades. We were twelve, placed in a row with our muskets before a wall. I remember well that it was in the morning. Some of us trembled, but I did not. They led out the hostages five of them. One was a young man, beard less, very much like you, Edward, and he was a priest (I pre sume), as he wore a sutane. I was directly opposite him, and T said to myself, 'I will not let you suffer much, you are too young,' and I aimed straight at his breast, while I looked him full in the face. After the shot 1 approached him; he had fallen on his side, but he was not dead, and I heard him say, 'Forgive him, O my God! and save his soul!' The ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

187 The Indian Advocate. statue, his eyes wide open, his countenance pale with mjngled emotions. At length Elise arose, and with the strength given by her faith, said very softly: "Father, calnT"yourself. You have expiated your fault by these long years of corporal suffering; now you must be reconciled to God. Let me send for a priest, I entreat you?" "Can he take away that drop of blood?" "Perhaps so," sai'd she, soothingly. "What one priest has placed another priest may remove." This idea impressed the old man. He raised his eyes timidly to Edward, for he was afraid of his own son. Elise took her brother's hand with an imploring glance. "Go for a priest," said the youth. A quarter of an hour after a priest entered that garret and conversed a long time with the aged tiler. The next day he came back, bringing with him the Holy Oils, and offered the poor family all the consolation in his power, so that Edward was touched by his piety and benevolence. When the Holy Oil was applied to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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