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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1905

answers this question in the Indiana Farmer as follows: "We save a great number, in fact, most all chicks that are afflicted with the disease, by strip ping the seeds from blue grass stems, and introducing the stem into the windpipe, very cautiously, turning once or twice, then withdraw. The worms become entangled in the stems of the grass and thus are caught. This is a very slow proces, but is the surest method we have ever tried. We have used air-slaked lime over the runs with very satisfactory results. This not only kills the thread-like parasite, but the birds breath the dust which makes the worms relax their hold, and when the chicks cough or sneeze, the worms are ejected. Therefore in this treat ment we have a cure and preventive all combined, or as nearly so as has ever been found. And we doubt if there is another remedy known that will prove as beneficial in preventing and curing the gape worm as a thor ough application of air-slaked lime over the runs. We have great faith i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1905

1* COMMISSION ROW TALK So far the market on local produce this spring has been a very encourag ing one. The demand has been good for all kinds of produce, and prices have ranged reasonably high. Cher ries, for Instance, which have been on the local market for nearly two weeks, have been picked up at fancy prices as fast as they have come in, and the de mand indicates that there is room for more. There are lots of Yaldma cher ries coming in at the present time, too, so that the good prices have not been due to any shortage, but to a good healthy condition of the market, result ing from a good cherry appetite on the part of the public and a willing ness to pay a fair price to appease it. Common cherries are selling at from 50 to 60 cents and Black Tartari cher ries at from 75 to 85 cents a box. A few cherries are being received from Wenatchee, also, though the receipts from this and other districts outside of Yakima have been light so far. A few sour cherries are being received from t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1905

THE, FIELD The Imported Cabbage Worm. The worst of the many destructive enemies of the cabbage and other cru cifers is the larva or caterpillar of a white butterfly Known to science as Pontia rapae Linn. The caterpillar, nailed the imported cabbage worm, is altogether too well known by farmers throughout this country as well as in ihe old world, and the adult insect, the imported cabbage butterfly, (called also (he white or rape butterfly), is a familiar object to nearly every one. It is generally recognized that the but terfly is the parent of the caterpillar. This cabbage worm is velvety green in color, much like the cabbage on which it feeds. There is a faint yellow stripe down the middle of the back and a row of yellow spots along each side with the spiracles or breathing pores. It measures, when full grown, about an inch and a fourth. The butterfly has a wing expanse of nearly two inches, and is white, marked with black near the tips of the fore wings. In the fe male there are ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1905

H LIVE STOCK Stockraising and Irrigation. One of the arguments advanced by certain interests in the west who have opposed the policy of national irriga tion and the saving of the public do main in small tracts for actual settlers has been that the development of the west along these lines would result in the destruction of the stockraising industry in the west, causing in time a great shortage in the meat supply of Ihe whole country, with consequent higher prices to the consumer, says Maxwell*- Talisman. Those who have been gobbling up the public domain in large tracts tor stock ranges or for speculative purposes have said that stockraising could not be successfully or profitably carried on except upon very large ranches or the free public range. But the fact is that actual ex perience goes to prove that their claims are not well founded. While irrigation will undoubtedly in time do away with the range system of stock raising, it will not destroy the industry nor lesses its importan...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1905

iind many other things that can and do happen. Live stock should be market ed as soon as in condition, and many a producer has made more money by Belling his stock on a low market, a3 against holding: them for a small raise. peed and shrinkage eat up all the profits in a very short time. It is also very interesting to note the difference !n the manner cattle are weighed in i lie east and in California. With us the buyer requires that cattle shall stand without feed or water for from 10 to 14 hours; if the price is 8 cents and animals weigh 1000 pounds, he pays you 8 cents for 500 pounds; in other words the gross weight is cut in two — ,i losing proposition where an animal v ill dress from 55 to 05 per cent. While in the eastern market 8 cents means growl weight, and the cattle have not only been given all the hay they will eat but are fully watered immediately i.efore being driven to the scale to be weighed." This is the season in which to give attention to the prevention of disease...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1905

16 Don't You Believe the Agent „, 1. '''-TJJZSJ"-jJ»U J! jWIIBU-El^ Who says n*s oIH stc bucket bowl separator is 'just as good" as the Tubular. Tell \^^4^^^^^^^ ' iISINHk him that you are rom Missouri and "must be shown." Remember what we say: \s'. .* , -Jr^m M ■•»*' mß^ The Tubular is the closest skimming separator. It recently skimmed more than I K'::'^^^Smß^^^^~^^^f^^^^t^^ twice as close as the best out of three other competing- machines. Write for press i :^^W^lWP^^^rWivl clipping of the Fairmount Separator competition. When it comes to ease of oper ■' ifflP^^^SlHl^^^^^^S^M ation, THE TUBULAR RUNS 20 PER CENT LIGHTER than any other make. All '- -V * jKBJBSJBJIi - • V the gearing can be got at in an instant. It has an oiling device that does away with -^^^J^^^^BBhß-^w sight-feed lubricators, that often leak out all the oil. It has the only low-down sup •^gßlli^^H|^^Pl|ffi^^^^^S^^^ ply can; all other separators have theirs at least two feet higher up. One separator ,t'#JHM^^S^R^i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

. '-^SIsMw8lwa»^''^5aaBBHK^a^Ba|R^=3y<>^aTg|B^g '^L .ssaWsafc—^^[BIl Jgs^W"'*iiMrc!Sfc. _^~^*^^^^ . VOL. XXIT. NO. 13. THE SILO AND ITS UTHLITY By H. X*. BLANCHARD Many inquiries are coming to us these days regarding the silo, its con struction, etc., the writer, therefore, concludes that some information along the line of the silo would be both ac ceptable and appreciated. It was only a very few years since that the writer through the columns of The Ranch as w«ll as upon the lecture platform of the farmers' institutes and else where, began to urge upon the dairy farmers of the state the great advan tages of the silo. At that time there were probably not to exceed one-half dozen farmers in the state feeding silage. A few more had built silos but for one reason or another had abandoned their use with the first at tempt. The writer's first experience was not altogether satisfactory, but then and there it was conclusively demonstrated to his mind that the silo was the proper thin...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

2 EXPERIENCES All subscribers are invited to write for this column. For each accepted article we give 30 cents, either in subscription or advertis ing. Make your articles brief and write as often as you like. Profit in Poultry. —Poultry on the farm is remunerative acocrding to the care it receives. On the average farm the hens must have considerable feed in addition to what they can pick up, for a hen in order to do her best in lay ing, must receive a sufficient quantity of proper, nourishing food. Too often ihe so-called cholera is only the effect of insufficient or unsuitable food, which causes bowel disorders. In winter give them warm corn mash, cooking po tatoes also, and sweet potatoes, etc., and feeding it in cold weather. We formerly had much trouble with the so-called cholera, but since learning how to feed, we very seldom lost any. —G. W. Sheep Dip for Hen Lice. —We form erly were troubled with lice until we discovered the plan cf spraying our hen house and roosts with shee...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

THE RANCH Office; 870 Colman Building Mil I Kit I RKF.MAN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors ■ P. WALDEN. H. L. BLANCHARD MRS. S. Q. WEBSTER. Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Meath Subscription, In advance, on* year be cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle. subscrib ers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted In • every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commissions and sal aries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In wr'ting. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning; the paper will not answer as we cannot find It on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expira tion Is chcv.'n on your pacer by address label containing your name. Falling to receive the p...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDEN The city of Portland, Ore., is just now called "the city of roses". The designation is very appropriate, for such a sight of roses it was never my privilege to behold. Not only are the roses grown in great plenty in the gardens and the lawns, but they are to be found quite frequently in the streets. The park strip to be found along many of the wider streets in the residence part of the city often have a row of roses growing in them. No doubt the people of Portland have been preparing for this "carnival of roses" for the past three or four years, but this makes it none the less praise worthy. It is a most delightful greet ing to the thousands now thronging the streets of this beautiful city. One day we were treated to a rose show in the Festival Hall on the fair grounds. Such a magnificent show of roses I never saw. I heard people from Cali fornia and from the eastern states re mark that they never saw anything like it. To give an adequate descrip tion of thi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

I have but one answer to give to all such inquirers—and that is: "Don't!" Non-resident orcharding is of very doubtful value. Success is very un certain in such ventures. Two ladies called on me not long since because I was reported to have been successful in fruit growing. They had grown up in Philadelphia and one of them still lived there, while the other lived in Seattle. They had never lived on a farm in all their lives and had no notion of living on a farm, but from what they had learned about the great profits in growing fruit they wanted to invest their money, which they assur ed me was not over-plentiful, in fruit growing so they would have a good, steady income in their declining years. They had been informed that I would tell them the truth about the business, and I did; and they went away fully satisfied that they would do well lo keep out of the business. It was fortunate that these ladies did not fall into the hands of some sharp er .who had land to sell and who was shor...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

(i THE DAIRY Most Profit from Fall Calving. Much has been written upon the best season for cows to drop their calves. Opinions still differ, and by far the greater number of milch cows are allowed to follow die most natural course, and either by indifference or intention they "come in" in the spring. The producer of milk lor sale, if he has an even trade, may want to have about an equal number of fresh cows every month in the year. If the bull is kept up and service controlled, this can be regulated as a rule, although unpleasant irregularities in breeding will sometimes occur and stubbornly resist correction. But if the prime object is to produce tne greatest quan tity of milk of the best quality and at the greatest profit from any given number of cows within a year, the evidence is overwhelming that the cows should be managed so as to calve in the autumn months For like rea sons, September is the best month, in most parts of the country, for a heifer to drop her first calf in orde...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

001 milking is profitable. Better re sults are believed to be obtained from cows which are inclined to take an annual rest, if not too long. A month is long enough; three weeks will dv in most cases, and six weeks should be the longest time encouraged or al lowed for a cow to be dry before calv ing. When the time comes for drying off a cow the grain food should be gradually withdrawn. This may of itself cause milk to cease forming. If not. omit one milking a day, then milk but once in two days, and thus extend the drying period over two weeks. The udder mast be watched, and it any nardening or unnatural heat is shown regular milking must be drawn. No cow should be forced to "go dry" against manifestly natural resistance to so doing. On the other hand, if an unpleasantly pungent or "smoky" taste appears in a cow's milk she may as well be dried at once, regardless of dates, as her milk will not be good until she is fresh again. To Find When Cow is in Calf. A correspondent gives the fo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

8 HOUSEHOLD MBS. 8. O. WKBSTKR Sea* communications for this department to Mrs. 8. Q. Webster, 259 Column Block, Seattle, or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. Good and Bad Manners. People behave with consideration for others, either because they have been taught to do so, or they are quick to observe politeness in others and pick up nice manners that way. Occasion ally one meets a person who is in stinctively polite and this is the person who has what is called "politeness of the heart." There is no one in the world more proud of America and Am ericans than I am, for the things for which we all have to be proud of them, but some American manners are so glaringly bad that I wonder they can exist in a land where people are so quick to understand other things. I was forcibly struck by this the other day when the "human flag drill" was tak ing place at the Portland fair. Several hundred school children dressed in t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

THE, FIELD How to Handle the Mower. William H«gan. How many men know how to look after the requirements of a mowing machine? Take up the wear of the boxes by removing the stuffer. If the journals have too much play they wear out fast, but if the boxes fit too closely they will heat. The thickness of a newspaper all around each is sufficient play. Examine all the nuts and tight en any that are loose. A loose nut will cause the machine to wear or break and will drop off in the field, causing vexatious delay at the least. If any nut is very loose place a leather washer under it and sink the nut in. Make quite sure that there is no weak place in the whiffletrees. They always break at the wrong time and may al low the machine and the team to mire down in a muddy spot. Mind Tje sickles. Every mower should have three sickle 3so that as soon as one becomes dulled, another may be put in in its place. A dull sickle does ragged cut ting and will increase the wear and draft of the machine one-h...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

10 POULTRY ——— H. L. BLANCHARD Communication* for this department art solicited. I'erßonal experiences detailed an* question* prove of irreat benefit. Write to H. U Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Fowl Management. It you arc catering more to the meat trade, then it may be different You will be comparatively safe in packing out birds that show the qualifications desired; deep full breasts, broad backs, strong thighs, etc. This is a good time to examine the legs of the fowls. If scale is starting nip it in the bud. Equal parts of kero sene and lard make a good ointment for this purpose. So does an ointment made of vaseline and sulphur, enough of the latter is used to work into a paste. First, wash off the dirt of the leg with warm water, and then anoint with the ointment or paste. Repeat the treatment daily until cured. Each day gather the droppings, and scatter sifted coal ashes, road dust, or sand, on the dropping platforms, and generally about the hous...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

i-pmove them into a separate loft as soon as they are weaned and able to care for themselves. For persons of small means, the breeding of squabs for market is spec ially attractive. Utilize the stale bread by crumbling it small und giving it to the birds dry. The age of a squab fit for eating is four to six weeks. The droppings of pigeons are very valuable to florists and tanners. In order to raise fat squabs, the breeders must not be disturbed and must be kept quiet. If possible, when you have a twelve month-old cock bird, mate him to a -ix-month-old hen. Keep your loft well ventilated, pro vltllng drafts are avoided. This is a sood way to keep free from disease If a quarrelsome cock bird is noticed in a flock, it is best to remove him and substitute a more peaceful one. Quietly approach a bird that is sit ting, as, confusion often causes loss or young just hatched, as well as injur ing eggs due to hatch. Thomas Wright says that where a pigeon is indisposed, with no appar ent disea...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

12 COMMISSION ROW TALK Commission Row is a busy place these days, owing to the fact that such a variety of produce is on the market and so many now things are coming in. Then there is the usual stress of preparing for the Fourth of July sea son, and tho opening of navigation to Nome and far northern Alaska has stimulated business and kept the ship pers bU3y preparing big consignments for the gold camps in the northland. * * * Now is the time when the fruit grow er has to keep his eyes open and to watch the markets, BO as to take the best advantage of earlier and better prices, to avoid glutting and killing profits and to know just what to ship at the right time. The experienced fruit-grower, the one who combines •good business sagacity with good hor ticultural ability, is beginning to be on the alert, because he knews that there is as much science in marketing the goods in a proper and timely manner as there is in growing them. This man makes a study of conditions, for he realizes t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

WHY WE SHOULD SPRAY. Wm. O. Bramblett. It is often asked: Why do we spray? To this I will say that it is the only way by which we can save our fruit from the ravages of the in sect pests with which our orchards abound. From the time the first blos som opens until the fruit is harvested there is something to hinder its growth, and the insects' battle cry is: "Spray or surrender!" And by spraying we can save our fruit from those pests. In my exper ience of the past three years I have demonstrated that by spraying we can grow fruit like our forefathers did in the good old days gone by, when all the host of insects was unknown to mankind. The first year I ran a spraying ma chine I had care of twelve orchards, all of which came out nice and healthy in the fall, with a fine crop of apples, while orchards that were not sprayed were almost totally eaten up by the canker worm and tent caterpillar. The fruit had almost all dropped off and what was left was small and knotty. One tree of Northe...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1905

14 LIVE STOCK Stockmen and Changes. One remarkable thing about the live stock business is the continued changes that are taking place In the particular line of stock which the farmer produces. At one period we find farmers laying out large sums for cattle. They are willing to pay high figures for the same and for no other reason apparently than the fact that cattle at the time are booming. After a time the price of cattle goes way down, then those farmers are anxious to invest in something else. By the time that the change referred to has come maybe sheep will boom. They reduce their stock of cattle and invest in sheep, paying high prices in order to obtain them and thus they continue to change with almost every change in the values of live stock. No greater mistake could well be made in this particular line of the fanner's business. A particular kind of plant is wanted to grow success fully, a particular line of stock and that kind of plant will not answer well for some other kind ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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