ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Stylus, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,852 items from Stylus, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
8,852 results
Page 2 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

PETER J. BRADY - Reliable . .. Job Printer 626 Massachusetts Ave. (Near Washington St.) - BOS TON Class Emblems Buttons, Badges and Jewels .... Prize Medals ~ IN GOLD AND SILVER Designs and Estimates Furnished The W. J. FEELEY CO. 71 E. Washington St 185 Eddj St Chicago, lite. Providence, R. I. I ■ ■.;> : ■" James R. Murphy , Bttorncg ana Counsellor at Xaw 27 School Street Nile* Ruifcling, Rooms 67, 68, 6t> BOS TOM

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BALLAD OF A MAGIC NIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

BALLAD OF A MAGIC NIGHT. The pale moon lends a silvery sheen The dark lake's restless waves to cheer, While many a merman hold. I ween. And many an elf on moorland drear Is quaking now with a new-found fear, For a phantom crew from the shores of night That sailed down the ways of the winding mere Hath veiled the realm in mystic white. The gaunt groves gazed with marvelling mien— With fir-fringed brows and garments sere— While the subtlest fairies e'er Fancy hath seen Were weaving on hillside far and near Alraiment that gleams in the starlight clear With myriad gems. Oh wondrous sight! 'Tis the roguish Pixies' trickery here I lath veiled the realm in mystic white. llark! the sad owl plaints to the winds that glean The harvest-frost —the roses' bane— While they moan their dirge with voices keen : Lo ! the waves are bound in an adamant chain, And the stars from the sea-glooms begin to wane, Slow droops the moon, and the mystical flight Of the eeriest night of all the year I lath veiled...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A MESSAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

A MESSAGE. I whispered a word to a butterfly. Sweet message and brief as he fluttered by : I bade him ask of my gardener fair A kiss from her ruby lips so rare. But whether it reached her I cannot say. For messages oftimes go astray : And whether she'd grant the kiss, ah, who knows? For I am only a red garden rose. —J. A. Crowley, '97.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE KNIGHT’S TALE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

THE KNIGHT’S TALE. THE writings of Chaucer were composed in the latter years of what is termed the transition period, and were '•a genuine product of the union of Saxon and Norman enterprise." At this time Chaucer, by great labor, succeeded in welding together the chaotic mass of words then in vogue. O O For the language of the time was a mixture of Saxon and Norman, and it is the undying praise of Chaucer that out of this heterogeneous mass he drew the elements of that vigorous and terse English which has won the admiration of scholars of all countries. In the present sketch, however, we shall not consider his influence upon the English language, but that poetic gem of his known as the "Knight's Tale." This poem is admitted by good critics to be Chaucer's most finished piece. It was the product of his maturer years, vears of experience and trial, in which the sorrows of life had made him acquainted with the traits and secret workings of the human heart. The "Knight's Tale" was orig...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CATHOLICISM AND SCIENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

CATHOLICISM AND SCIENCE. (COMPETITION ESSAY) IN last month's STYLUS, in the essay on the above subject, it was shown that adherence to the doctrines of the Catholic Church has never been, as has been so often asserted by the Church's foes, an obstacle to advancement in scientific investigation. Considering the various branches of modern science, it was shown that astronomy, chronology, geography, mechanics, mathematics, acoustics, optics and thermotics owe much to the earnest labor of devoted sons of the Church; and, although enough has been said to convince any unbiassed mind that Catholicism, far from being a stumbling-block in the pathway of science, has always been a most potent and beneficent factor in its furtherance, nevertheless this second paper on the same subject will not be inopportune since herein will be examined the work of Catholics in those branches not already considered, and it will also be shown that the motives which guide the true Catholic scientist in his inve...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
“EHEU! FUGACES!” [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

“EHEU! FUGACES!” Youth cannot last, 'Tis fleeting as a dream, How soon 'tis past! Youth cannot last — Fading as fast As twilight's waning beam, Youth cannot last, 'Tis fleeting as a dream. —John C. Sivtcney, 97.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
RAY HARDING. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

RAY HARDING. OXE evening towards the latter part of December, Ray Harding sat with his mother in a parlor of the house in East Boston which they had occupied, since the untimely death of Ray's father had obliged them to leave their fashionable dwelling in the Back Bay. It was a cold evening with frequent gusts of snow and wind outside; but within, the oaken logs burned brightly in the fire-place and cast a cheerful glow about the room. Could anyone have seen the mother and son as they sat by the fire, he would have said immediately that they represented two periods of life; one, the strength and pride of vouth, the other the calm and dignity of old age. "Mother," said Ray, "it is just five months yesterday since I had to leave college to work for our support, and during most of that time, I have had a little secret, but I think there is no use of keeping it any longer." "What is the trouble, Ray?" inquired his mother. "It's just this: about a month after I left college, I met one of...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
“DURUM SEDLEVIUS FIT PATIENTIA.” [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

“DURUM SEDLEVIUS FIT PATIENTIA.” My weary head drops on my breast Before this stupid Greek translation. In working out a classic jest, My weary head drops on my breast. Yet I must still plod onward. lest I fail in the examination. My weary head drops on my breast Before this stupid Greek translation. —D, '97.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PAST AND PRESENT. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

PAST AND PRESENT. " The friendship I have conceived will not be impaired by absence; but it may be no unpleasing circumstance to brighten the chain by a renewal of the covenant." — Washington. It may be thought presumptuous in an undergraduate to treat of the relations between Alma Mater's present and past students, hut I have ventured to hope that my few remarks will he received with consideration, if not with approval. What, then, should he the feeling of the vounger students who are still toiling up the rugged steeps of Parnassus towards those who have reached the summit and have there been crowned as worthy to sit in the halls of knowledge and of wisdom ? To answer this question, let us examine the sentiments entertained by every loval alumnus for his Alma Mater. His first feeling is undoubtedly one of the deepest gratitude. On his withdrawal from the halls which have watched over his steady growth in culture, his heart as he grasps his diploma —the passport to the busy outer wo...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

EXCHANGES. SEVERAL of our exchanges issued exquisite numbers commemorative of the hallowed Yule-tide, and, that we have not given them any notice until this late day, is to be attributed to lack of space in our January number, not to any want of appreciation on our part. The Mt. St. J ferry s Record for December appeared before the public clothed in a golden garb. The adage, "All that glitters is not gold," came to our mind when the Record received our first coup d'oeil. With this thought we turned to its contents, and were agreeablv disappointed to find more gold within than without. The number was worthy ot Christmas-tide, and its editors are to be congratulated on having been able to beautify an alreadv beautiful paper. The Purple , brief as has been its period of literary activity, shows evidence of receiving good support from the students and friends of Holv Cross College. The December issue contained more original student work than any other of our exchanges, and gave ample pr...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
STYLUS PRIZE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

STYLUS PRIZE. A friend of education, a member of the class of 'B4, offers a prize of twenty-five dollars for the best competition essay printed in this paper. The attention of all competitors is called to the following points : 1. The subject is left to the judgment of the writer. 2. The essay must not exceed I,s°° words—about five pages of foolscap. 3. The judges will he three former editors of the STYLUS. 4. The essay will be judged by (a) its literary excellence, (b) its originality or treatment of the subject. Each one may compete as often as he chooses. 6. The competition will be closed on May 1, 1895. 7. Writers competing should mark their essays "Competition Essays." 8. The writer must sign an assumed name, and send the same with his own to the Director of the Editorial Staff. 9. We look for excellence not quantity. Special Latin has received several strong recruits, who promise to infuse still more activity into that hard-working class. Charlie O'Brien will show the benefits...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Boston College Stylus. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

Boston College Stylus. PUBLISHED MONTHLY. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION : One dollar in advance, post-paid. Single copies, fifteen cents. ADVERTISING RATES: Address JAMES 11. DEVLIN, Advt rtising Agent, Boston C ollege. The STYLUS is published by the students of Boston College as an aid to their literary improvement, and to serve as a means of communication between the Alumni and the Under-graduates. It looks chiefly to present and former students, to graduates and their friends for its support. These are earnestly asked to give it their patronage. Address, BOSTON COLLEGE STYLUS, 761 Harrison Ave., Boston, Mass. THE STAFF: JOHN J. KIRBY,'9S EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. THOMAS J. GOLDING, '95 CHARLES T. MARTELL, '96 - - - I _ , , ' K ASSOCIATE EDITORS. JAMES P. WARREN, 96 - PATRICK S. CUNNIFF, '97 J JOHN M. FARRELL, '95 EXCHANGE EDITOR. JAMES 11. DEVLIN, '97 ----- BUSINESS MANAGER. FRANCIS T. CARNEY, '9B J . „ „ 7 „ ASSISTANT BUS. MAN. FRANCIS J. CONLIN, - - - " ) Press of the ANGEL GUARDIAN, 92 Ruggles...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EDITORIAL. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

EDITORIAL. TIIE object of education is to train the entire man and to fit him for the successful carrying out of the greal destiny of life here and hereafter. Now man, as we all know, is not composed of sonl only, but be has also a body which forms an integral part of his physical essence. To develop himself, therefore, entirely, not only the faculties of his soul are to be thoroughly trained, but also the various powers of his body should be brought.to that perfection of which they are capable. A sound body is almost as essential as a sturdy, well-trained soul for success in any trade or profession. And yet it has been often remarked that "a sound, healthy man who can stand up and declare himself free from the numberless ills to which flesh is heir, is something of a wonder in this age." It true that the main purpose of any institution of learning is to bring out and train the intellectual faculties, but this is not their sole duty and hence it is that in all the colleges of the la...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DOMI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

DOMI. The vio'ets fair Are all the show. Most maidens wear The violets fair; And everywhere You chance to go, The violets fair Are all the show. —La A/ode. How many received the greetings of St. Valentine day in the shape of some flaring, ugly caricature of himself or through some other cunning devices manufactured by the troublesome small bov of this progressive day? I can vouch, at least, for one received, that in some cases was anxiously awaited days beforehand—and that was the valentine sent out by our prefect of studies. Seldom does the student dread a message more than this one, which invariably like the cat in the song, finds its way home, and " the pity of it," into the hands of paterfamilias himself. But " actions speak louder than words," and strange to say, instead of being passed over as some frivolous sport, this one leaves behind such marks as require time, energy, and work to efface. The new slate of the Athletic Society is something of an ornament on the bare walls o...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
WOE IS ME! [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

WOE IS ME! The editor sits in his sanctum alone, Is scowling and growling in murderous tone. He glares with fierce eves on a long-written sheet! lle tears it to pieces ! lie stamps with both feet! The paper is surely some terrible thing! Dear reader, 'tis the latest effusion "To Spring." F. '95-

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ALUMNI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

ALUMNI. Since our last issue tliere has been an informal reunion, as it were, of the younger alumni owing to the midyear vacation at the seminaries. Quite a large number visited their Alma Mater and brought deep pleasure to the faculty by their gratifying accounts of the excellent work which the Boston College men are doing in St. John's Seminary, Brighton, and St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore. Rev. Henry A. Sullivan, '79, the former senior curate at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, was promoted to the Rectorate on the death of Rev. L. M. A. Corcoran last month. There are now two Boston College graduates doing ministerial work at the Cathedral; Fathei Sullivan's assistant being Rev. Nicholas R. Walsh, '77, and Rev. Thomas J. McCormick, 'B9. Two of the most prominent alumni have recently departed for foreign travel. Rev. John F. Cummins, '72, will seek renewed strength through a trip to the Holy Land and Rev. William 11. O'Connell, 'Sr. will renew old acquaintances at the Eternal Citv ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CLASS NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

CLASS NOTES. '9s THE Seniors held their annual banquet at Young's Hotel, 011 the evening of January 24th. The exercises of the occasion, both prandial and post-prandial were extremely enjoyable. The literary programme was of exceptional excellence. proving by its intellectual merit that the members of '95 are loyal sons of Boston College. Michael J. Scanlon acted as toast-master. Toasts were responded to as follows : "Our Class," Pres. Michael J. Shannon, "Alma Mater," Thomas J. Golding, "Philosophus Ipse," Charles J. Ring, "The College Man in the World," Thomas R. McCoy, "Chemistry," Martin Harty, "Quid Erit," John J. Stinson, "The Trials of a College Reporter," George J. Weller. The oration was delivered by John J. Kirby and a poem was read by John M. Farrell. Speeches were made by the Rev. Fr. Fullerton, Professor of Sciences, and bv Professor Albert J. Dorse\. both present as guests of honor. John J. Xugent, of the class, spoke very elegantlv and earnestly on "The Friendship and...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SOCIETIES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

SOCIETIES. THE Fulton Debating Society had its annual prize debate on Thursday, February 21st. The subject was —"Resolved, that pensions should not be granted bv the government to those who have other means of support." Wm. C. S. Healy, and John }. Kirby, '95, defended the affirmative side of the question, William J. Hasson, '96, and Patrick S. Cunniff, the negative. The medal was donated by William G. Macdonald, M. D., a graduate of the class of '77, and one of the judges of last year's debate. The arrangements for the joint debate with the Philodemic Society of Georgetown College are entirely completed. April 25th is the date mutually agreed upon. The subject will be chosen by the F. D. S. and the side by the Georgetown men. Some time in March the election of honorary members to the society will take place. A special programme will be prepared for the occasion, and the faculty, students and others invited to be present. The contest over the election of three new members was happil...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BOOK NOTICE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

BOOK NOTICE. Orations and Arguments by English and American statesmen, edited bv Cornelius B. Bradley, and published bv Allyn & Bacon. This book is earnestly recommended to all those who desire to have a practical knowledge of rhetoric. A mere theoretical knowledge of the artificial structure of a speech is utterly useless for one's future life, unless it is accompanied bv an intimate acquaintance with the leading speeches of the great English and American orators. It is this which the little book mentioned above aims to accomplish. Within the small compass of 350 pages, select speeches are given from Burke, Chatham, Erskine, Macaulay, Webster, Calhoun, Seward, Lincoln, together with a number of valuable notes extremely helpful to an intelligent grasp of each oration. That no student of rhetoric should be without this book is something so self-evident that words of ours are not needed to urge the value of it to the earnest workers of '96. The daily perusal of these maste...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
COMMUNICATION. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 February 1895

COMMUNICATION. OUR Reverend Prefect has received the following letter from Will Grainger, whom all will remember as a thoughtful student of '96, who has been forced bv ill health to discontinue his studies for a time. HIGHLAND PARK HOTEL, AIKEN. S. C.. Feb. 2, 1895. MY DEAR FATHER DOHERTY : I have heard of your desire to receive news of rav health and hence I send you a letter to give you a conclusive proof that I have not forgotten you and my old school-fellows. I came South, as vou know, about the middle of December and since then the improvement of mv health has been so constant that I am now almost entirely well again. Indeed. I have added seven pounds to my weight, my cough is disappearing and I am looking every way much stronger than when I left Boston. The change from the cold regions of the North to the sunnv groves of the South is sudden and enjoyable. After a few days of rapid travel, all trace of winter seemed to have disappeared and we were rushing past cotton fields, wh...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
x
Loading...
x
x