ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Recorder, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
116,947 results
New Orleans Anniversary. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

New Orleans Anniversary. In 1923 the two hundredth anniversary of the formal elevation of New Orleans to a capital city, with the historic Place d’Anues as its civic center, will be celebrated, and by that time it is hoped not only to have Jackson square and its surroundings duplicate its ancient arrangement but also to duplicate the ceremony which marked the- occasion as memorable as any in American civic history.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Fox Aids Farmer. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Fox Aids Farmer. Besides such poultry as they capture, foxes are very fond of field mice and destroy thousands of them; in this way they are a positive benefit to the agriculturist, says the American Forestry Magazine. They also catch and eat many woodchucks —the latter standing in the utmost fear of them.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Indian Chief Drives Auto, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Indian Chief Drives Auto, An Indian Chief, Tony Tommy, of the Florida Seminoles, who still wear the garb of their forefathers, is the first of his tribe to buy and operate his own automobile. After a course of instruction at a garage in Miami, the -£hief now rolls into town each week from his village, near Fort Lauderdale, at the wheel of bis machine, but with a pair of horn-rlm glasses ns his only other concession to the ways of the palefaces.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Farm for Sale [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Farm for Sale For ashort time only, about 250 acres good grass land, six miles west of Hightown, Va., near the S. & P. Pike and 13 miles east of Bartow, W. Ya., also 2| miles east of North Fork Lumber Co’s, railroad which is still coming closer, a good school half m, away on Co. R. The farm lays real nice and is smoothe, practically all enclosed with rail and wire fen •.and produces gccd crops. On this tract of land is a good com 'ortable dwelling house and and all necessary out buildings such as 2 good barns, smoke house, spring house, granery, wagon shed, also two empty houses. About 150 acres in good sod, includes meadows and farm fields, balance in good hard wood and about 30 acres of good spruce timber estimated to cut from 12 to 1500 cords pulp wood. The timber alone is well worth the price of the place. This farm has on it three orchards all bearing trees, a fine sugar orchard of 500 trees. Last year the farm cut 20 stacks of hay. Seven never failing springs on th...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
GOOD CHEER AT WHITE HOUSE President Harding's Reported Bill of Fare Certainly Smacks of Demo- – cratic Simplicity. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

GOOD CHEER AT WHITE HOUSE President Harding's Reported Bill of Fare Certainly Smacks of Demo- - cratic Simplicity. It Is said that the Harding White House bill of fare will Include chicken pie, as the first lady of the land knows how to make it —and waffles, browned to a turn, by the efficient old-fashioned colored cook of the Harding household. This smacks of democratic simplicity and "homey” housekeeping of the good old days. The state breakfast and the diplomatic dinner are necessarily more pretentious, and “old-time eating,” served in the old-time way, if not altogether discountenanced, is so disguised as to make the satisfying plenty of the home table seem like a far-off dream. But, allowing for the proprieties of state banquets and the like, there is never a distinguished guest of them all hut that has come up from plain “home raising,” and still remembers tlie dishes of old days as more to thank God for than all the French refinements of later repasts. The "homeliness” and he...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
TENANT FINDS BURIED MONEY And Now a Court Must Pick the Owner of Treasure Discovered Hidden in Jars. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

TENANT FINDS BURIED MONEY And Now a Court Must Pick the Owner of Treasure Discovered Hidden in Jars. Rumors of the. finding of a great treasure in the old Holland house here have been confirmed by the filing of suit In the Fayette county circuit court by the administrators of the Holland estate against a dozen defendants alleged to have shared in the division of the treasure, which amounted to $21,000, says a dispatch from Nuttallburg, W. Va., to the Pittsburgh Dispatch, Attachments were served on 50 banks in the surrounding section, where the money is believed to have been deposited. The story of the treasure reads like romance. In tlfe sixties William Holland, veteran of the Crimean war, came to this country from England and settled In the Pennsylvania coal fields. In 1872 he came to Kenney’s creek and began the development of a kiln. He built a home hex*e in 1880, where he resided until his death in 1918. He was an eccentric character, and none of his family knew of his habit of ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Shuts Out Sound. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Shuts Out Sound. Persons who wish to concentrate their attention upon studies, business matters or what not, often find themselves most annoyingly distracted by noises of one kind or another. Street traffic may be disturbing; the crying of a baby may irritate, or perhaps the yowling of cats on a back fence or the persistent tooling of a cornet in the neighborhood may induce exasperation. To obviate this sort of trouble, Gabino Jauregul of Bridgeport, Conn., has devised what he calls the “ear silencer,” It is a frame of light construction which may be fixed upon the head in such a way that two screws carrying soft rubber plugs on their ends are inserted into the ears. When this adjustment has been made exactly right the two screws that carry the rubber plugs enter the wearer’s ears horizontally and have only to be tightened sufficiently in order to fit snugly and exclude all tinoublesome sounds.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Opossum a Pest in Australia. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Opossum a Pest in Australia. New Zealand has a native species of opossum which wears a very beautiful fur. It is not at all like the opossum that we know in this country. Many years ago it was introduced into Australia, and, finding there none of the natural enemies that preyed upon It in its own land, it has since increased in numbers until it has become a serious pest. It Is a robber of fruit trees. However, the value of the animal for its fur is so great as to outweigh the damage it does in the fruit-growing sections, and In view of this fact, the Australians are encouraging the increase of opossums in forest districts. Their skins are becoming a considerable item of export, and already many of them are made up into fashionable garments for women in the United States. —Philadelphia Ledger.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
First American Train Robbery. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

First American Train Robbery. Train robbery, a pastime which was for some years very popular in the West, was inaugurated 48 years ago at Verldo, Nevada, when the Overland express was held up and despoiled of about $50,000, This robbery marked a new departure in the field of crime, for previously only stage coaches and travelers had fallen prey to holdup men. When western outlaws are discussed, the name of Jesse James is usually the first brought up, but he was not the pioneer train robber. That dubious distinction belongs to one Buck Taylor, who, with four companions, pulled off the train holdup which was the first of a long string of similar crimes.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
NEBULA SHOWS SOME SPEED Body Flying Through the Heavens at Rate of Two Thousand Kilometers a Second. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

NEBULA SHOWS SOME SPEED Body Flying Through the Heavens at Rate of Two Thousand Kilometers a Second. The Lowell observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz., /las held a stop watch on the fastest moving object ever discovered. The spiral nebula catalogued as No. 584, Dreyer’s catalogue, constellation of Cetus, is flying through the heavens at the rate of 2,000 kilometers a second. An airplane going at this speed would circumnavigate the earth at the equator in less than half a minute. The spiral nebulae are the swiftest moving objects in the known universe, but no one has ever before been de-% tected shooting through the heavens at much more than half the speed of 584-Dreyer-Cetus. Most stars move slowly and sedately along at about 100 kilometers a second. What is perhaps rather humiliating to us earth dwellers is the fact that Cetus is moving in the direction away from our own earth and sun. Of course the speed of light, which is nearly 300,(MX) kilometers a second, makes the speed of the spira...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
SPORT ADORED BY FILIPINOS Cock Fighting the One Occupation That Appeals to the Heart of the Brown Brothers. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

SPORT ADORED BY FILIPINOS Cock Fighting the One Occupation That Appeals to the Heart of the Brown Brothers. In every one of the larger cities of the Philippines and throughout every one of the thousands of little barrios—from northern Luzon to southern Mindanao—little barrios that fringe the ocean’s edge or nestle among the hills, there is but one universal and adored sport, but one game that is pre-emi-nently popular from the mountain fastnesses of the headhunters to the southern shores of Moroland, and that Is cock fighting. Every Sunday morning—for Sunday Is the great day for the sport—at the first crack of dawn along the roads and trails that lead into the little settlements and on the streets that twist through the smelly and ramshackle barrios, will be met numbers of Filipinos walking with a quick, jaunty step, anticipation written plainly upon their brown faces and an unusual light in. their dark eyes. Each carries his favorite game cock under his arm, and all are converging ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
“Lost” Lincoln a Mystery [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

“Lost” Lincoln a Mystery An oil painting of Abraham Lincoln, 25 by 35 indies in size, rescued several years ago from a pile of supposedly worthless furniture taken from the old Red Lion inn in Philadelphia, today forms a mystery over which there is much discussion by artists. After its rescue the picture was hung in a Philadelphia residence where a painter, Baruch M. Feldman, happened upon It and purchased it. He began the work of reclaiming it, and after the dirt had been removed the portrait stood out, clear and well defined in all its features. Artists who have seen the picture are agreed that the character of the portrait is such that the suggestion that it might have been painted from a photograph is rendered absurd. Who painrted the “lost” Lincoln is a mystery, and there is no mark or sign to give those studying it a clew that might lead to its identification.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Shows Kindergarten's Value. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Shows Kindergarten's Value. The importance of the kindergarten as an Americanizing influence was urged by Maj. Bradley Martin, president of the National Kindergarten association, at the recent regional citizens’ conference in New York. “The kindergarten,” said Major Martin, “is obviously the ideal means of Americanizing the family through the child; as the child through singing patriotic songs and playing games with other children and receiving moral and ethical instruction, not only learns our language, but also adopts our point of view and becomes a patriotic citizen; and through mothers’ meetings and home visits the family Is assisted by the kindergarten teacher in the difficult task of adapting itself to the economic and social conditions, that it finds in- this country.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
May Discover Earth's Secret. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

May Discover Earth's Secret. On the shores of Lough Neagh, in Ireland, mysterious explosions, generally occurring In warm and fine weather, have long been known as “water guns.” The most plausible theory to account for these strange noises Is that they are caused by movements of rocks —settlings', perhaps—deep down in the earth’s crust. It has been suggested that they might be profitably studied with the help of the newly Invented listening devices, by which even the smallest sounds transmitted through the ground ca* be heard. — Philadelphia Ledger

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Hope for Us Yet [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Hope for Us Yet “Whf.t do you regard as the bulwark of the nation?” “The common sense of the plain people.” “When does it assert itself?” “That’s bard to say, but a statistician tells me GO per cent of our population has never learned to ‘shimmy,’ ” —Birmingham Age-Herald.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
§90,000 ALIMONY HIGHEST GRANTED [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

§90,000 ALIMONY HIGHEST GRANTED First victory in the famous Stillman divorce case in New York went ;to the wife of the International (financier and president of the National City Bank. It was in the ot a alimony of $.90,000 a year, and $47,000 special counsel and legal expense money in defending her suit. Banker •Mibrnan sued his wife for divorce naming a Frcnch-Canadian Indian guide as corespondent and disownmg his two-year-old son, Baby Guy Stillman. _ Mrs. Stillman filed a counter-suit, naming Florence Law-! .or Leeds, former Broadway chorus 1 girl, as corespondent. Mrs. is als° the mother of a two-yea rJ o.d boy. fins photo of Mrs. Stillman is exclusive- ' ■

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Japanese Remain Buddhists, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Japanese Remain Buddhists, That SO per cent of the Japanese living in the sugar plantation camps of Hawaii never have been touched by Christian propaganda, and that American plantation owners, managers and others who have helped support Japanese Buddhist missions, “did a foolish -thing, if ever man did,” were two of the statements made by Rev. Ulysses <}. Murphy, representative of the American Bible society, in a recent address at Honolulu. Rev. Mr. Murphy also said that the elder generation of Japanese living in the plantation camps, owing to their Isolation, are forty years behind their native country in thought and understanding of modern conditions. Any attempt at Americanization of the Japanese in Hawaii which leaves untouched their home life and fails to recognize that the key to the problem is the Japanese language schools is foredoomed to failure, Rev. Mr. Murphy declared.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Almost Had It. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Almost Had It. One of the Terre Haute ward schools was having a contest in seeing which children could learn the airs of a number of standard songs so they could tell their names when they heard a few bars of the melody played. After “Home, Sweet Home” and “Old Black Joe” had been played several times the teacher put on the record “Relieve Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms.” It was played a few minutes and she began to look expectantly at the children. Then a fair little youngster looked triumphantly up from the list of songs he had in his hand. “Oh, it’s that believe me in tears all about your charms,” he hazarded. —Indianapolis News'.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Would You Believe It? [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Would You Believe It? The game of croquet does not develop experts and enthusiasts to the extent that golf and tennis do; hut more people play it and more wood is consumed In providing the balls, mallets and stakes than in the production of golf clubs and tennis rackets combined, says the American Forestry Magazine of Washington. The entire playing 'outfit, of croquet! is made of wood except the arches, and sometimes these are of bent wood.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Some Large Emeralds. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 15 April 1921

Some Large Emeralds. One South American country has produced an emerald of 030 carats size and claimed it was the largest emerald in the world, and then learned that fields in the Ural mountains have produced emeralds that weighed six nnd three-quarters pounds, while the South American stone weighed only one-third of a pound. The six and three-quarter pound emerald was among tin* crown jewels of Russia, and its location now is unknown.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x