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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

PAGE F BLUE RIDGE DIGEST QUALITY FASHIONS AT A 'LITTLE FOLKS' PRICE FOR BOYS 6 6IRLS. SIZES NEWBORN-I4 HON-SAT 9:30-6 703-236-6401. 2H VA 89 CROSSOVER. Galax is 7 ai. north. 6alax, VA - Pop. 6700 7 ai. north of Parkway on VA 89. Hoae of 'OLD FIDDLER'S CONVENTION*. Antiques, crafts and auseui. ROSE LANE HOTEL - AAA & HOBILE GUIDE. US 58 * 221 IN GALAX. 55 SPACIOUS QUIET PANELED ROOHS. AIR-CONDITIONED. PHONES. CABLE COLOR TV. REASONABLE PANORAMIC VIEW. AE, MASTERCARD, VISA. RESTAURANT. 703-236-5117. GRANNY'S ATTIC - ANTIQUES; COUNTRY CRAFTS; OLD QUILTS; BABY ITEMS-OLD fc NEN; COLLECTIBLES. JCT 89 N 1/4 HI. TURN LEFT ON SR RD 613 2 HI. ON RIGHT 703/236-2684. 216.9 NC-VIR6INIA STATE LINE. Alt. 2,547. 217.5 CUMBERLAND KNOB. Visitor Contact Station for information. Picnic area, coafort stations, Mater. Short loop (15 tin.) trail to Cumberland Knob, ele. 2,855. 2 hour loop trail into Gully Creek gorge. Alt. 2,740. 218.6 FOX HUNTERS PARADISE. Parking area & overlook....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

MYSTERY HILL - NC'S HOST UNUSUAL ATTRACTIONS. EDUCATIONAL fc FUN FOR WHOLE FAHILY. HWY 221-321 BETWEEN BOONE & BLOWING ROCK. HT. ANTIQUE MUSEUM WITH 10,000 ANTIQUES, LIFESTYLES MUSEUM, HANDMADE CANDY AND WOODCRAFTS. OPEN YEAR ROUND 704-264-2792. BOX WOOD MOTEL - N MAIN ST., PO BOX 1509. ON 321 BUS. SPACIOUS ROOMS, APTS., COTTA6ES, COLOR TV, ELECTRIC HEAT & AIR. OPEN ALL YEAR. 704-295-9984. BLOWING ROCK CRAFTS - US 321 BY-PASS. HOME OF THE 600DWIN GUILD WEAVERS. ESTABLISHED 1812. AUTHENTIC REPRODUCTIONS OF COLONIAL HANDLOOM PATTERNS. WEAVINGS INCLUDE COVERLETS, AFGHANS, PLACEMATS, AND TABLECLOTHS. MOUNTAIN CRAFTS AND 6IFTS. 600DWIN WEAVERS, PQ BOX 314, BLOWING ROCK, NC 28605, 704-295-3577 OPEN YEAR 'ROUND. 292.7 TO 295 MOSES H. CONE MEMORIAL PARK and Parkway Craft Center. Miles of horse & carriage trails in 3,600 acres. 295 to 299 JULIAN PRICE MEMORIAL PARK. Alt. 3,400. Picnic area, caipground, fishing, trails. 298.6 JUNCTION PARKWAY & ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

PAGE H BLUE RIDGE DIGEST MQTJM Falmouth - "Shenandoah," Kincaid Regional Theatre, Falmouth Auditorium, 410 Chapel St. (Thu.-Sat. 8:15 pm, Sun 2:30 pm) Northern Kentucky's only professional theater will present the story of a father's struggle to keep his family neutral during the Civil War (606) 654-6911. _ Harrodsburg "Lincoln," James Harrod Amphitheatre, Old Fort Harrod State Park. (Wed. & Fri 8:15 pm.) The moving outdoor drama tells the life story of Honest Abe. (606) 734-3346. Pikeville - Pikeville Jaycees Fourth of July Celebration. City Park. (Noon - 10 pm.) The largest fireworks display in Eastern Kentucky is accompanied by music, patriotic speeches and games. Contact: Bryan Compton, P0 Box 2555, Pikeville, KY 41501. (606) 4325504. EBBS! Berea - Fifth Annual Bearea Craft Festival. Indian Fort Theater. (10 am - 6 pm.) Over 100 exhibitors from fifteen states will gather to display, demonstrate and sell their work. Strolling minstrels and other entertainment. Contact...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

GENEALOGY I am researching the Turner family of Christiansburg, VA and need to know the name of Alexander A. Turner's father and his mother, Martha's maiden name. The 1850 Montgomery Co. census lists Martha Turner as head of household with children named Alexander A., Frances, Nelson, and Mary A. (born in 1850). Alexander A. Turner (nicknamed "Dell") married Diannah H. Banks in 1858 in Carroll Co. Their daughter, Mary Frances, married Andrew Jackson Gardner in 1884.1 shall be grateful for any information. Mrs. Jo Gardner Poindexter 712 Wick wood Dr. Chesapeake, VA 23320 I would like to learn about my grandmother's family who lived in the Franklin & Floyd Co. areas of VA. She was Florence Florentine Gillespie, born Jan. 26, 1863 in Franklin Co. She was the daughter of William E. Gillespie and Mary Jane Deaton Gillespie. She married James E. Gates of Richmond, VA. The marriage took place in Roanoke Co., VA. I would like to correspond with any of the Gillespie or Deaton Fam...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1986 One beautiful spring Sunday afternoon, my friend "Sarah Bee" and I were hiking through the woods when we spied a huge rhododendron. Sarah Bee exclaimed, "Oh! what a great, playhouse that would make!" That turned our conversation to our childhood days and building playhouses. If you have never built a playhouse, you have missed out on something special in a child's life. My cousin and I used to spend hours out in the woods building playhouses. It would take an entire evening to gather materials and get things in order. We went to the creek bank and swampy areas for soft mosses to cover the floor, then got our houses in order. Next we built a store, complete with items for sale. Sticks and rocks were used for money. We played like a family with mother, father and children. I always liked to be the mother and dress up, and put on makeup. A red cucumber fruit from the beautiful cucumber tree made a nice lipstick. When I went to the play store, my umbre...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 35 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

A feller just down the road was snakebit last year. Well, so was I, for that matter. This is pretty snakey country. Supposed to be like the Carolinas' western slope, some kind of geological mystery about it. Same animals and snakes and plants as the Carolinas, which may be why I feel so at home. This road I live on is about a mile from the Mississippi line, in Louisiana deer country. Oil country, too, I hope, with a manmade 75-acre lake to add to the good living on the front of the Louisiana boot where the leg part starts. John was cleaning up his yard, which must be one-half acre, at least, and part of his place is on the lake. The yard was full of leaves and all sizes of tree branches. John had recently bought the place and hadn't caught up yet on what he could put up with by way of tidy or untidy. So he was working past dark, piling up trash to burn later. It was a fall kind of day, but warm, so John was working barefoot. He does barefoot water sking, so maybe he was getting his ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 36 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1986 Today I wandered back in thought to the scents and sounds of the year 1939. I was a young teacher in a one-room school, Stowersville, Bland County, Virginia. The road that led to the country school was a small dirt road and long. Pupils walked along the dusty road, wading snow in the winter, carrying their bookbags and swinging their dinner bucket, usually a lard bucket. They had done their chores early so as not to be late. In pleasant weather they enjoyed the pleasant gentle breezes and the played on their faces. About a hop and jump away, above the schoolhouse, lived an old lady, a farmer's wife, She had remarried and had come to live in this little community. No doubt she was lonely at times. I can see her now as she stoo in front of her little cottage, artritic hands behind her, a starched cotton dress covered by an apron that went over her shoulder, a smile on her rund pleasant face and soft, fluffy white hair wound in a bun pinned hig on the...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 37 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

Claude Rogers Cruise, Sr. born August 17, 1893 was the son of Soloman Cruise (born October 19, 1861). His mother was Solomy "Mollie" Monday, born August 1, 1867. Mollie and Soloman were married December 8, 1885 at Belspur Primitive Baptist Church by Elder Matt Blancette. Soloman had a twin brother named David. Their mother dreamed she had twin boys and named them Soloman and David. Her dream came true. Soloman's wife Mollie had a twin sister whose name was Dalphne. Soloman and Mollie had five sons and two daughters. Each of their five sons had one son apiece. Soloman and Mollie's son Claude married Hattie Susan Thompson (called Bessie because she didn't like her real name). She was one of 12 children of Barney and Martha Dalton Thompson and lived at Laurel Fork, Virginia. Bessie and Claude met at Snake Creek Primitive Baptist Church. Claude was drafted in the army in 1917 to LCO-317, 80th Division. He almost didn't pass the physical as he only weighed 114 pounds. The doctor worried ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 38 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1986 NEW GROUND BY: HAZEL HEDRICK ©1986 As his family grew, Daddy needed more fields to grow more grain and vegetables to feed his growing chaps and the extra livestock. The larger his family grew, the more hogs he needed for meat, more chickens for eggs and more cows for milk and butter, and he had to grow enough grain and hay to feed all of them as well as his children. When we chaps were old enough to start school, Daddy had to have money for books and other school supplies, saying nothing of clothes and shoes. And he couldn't just take a fat hen to the store and trade it for a pair of shoes for me like he did for salt and coffee. He needed a money crop. The John Hayes Hollow was a rather large parcel of land around 60 or 70 acres, as I recall, but it was mostly steep hillsides and covered with growing trees - and rock. There were just a few small fields on top the mountains and along the creek. When more fields were needed, the land had to be cleare...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 39 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

The lives of people have always been influenced by communication and transportation. There was little of either available in America prior to 1800. When cities and villages began to be established along the eastern seaboard and more particularly in the New England area, a few stage coach lines carrying mail, small express and passengers came into being. Then with the advent of the Eric Canal and Clinton's steam engine to begin the era of the railroads, people began to be travel concious. The success of the Eric Canal caused the planning and starting of canal construction in the eastern United States, but the steam engine developed rail transportation so much more rapidly that canal transportation soon passed into oblivion. The Tennessee Road through southwestern Virginia was established as a principal route in the late 1700's and early 1800's. This route developed for several reasons. First, Philadelphia became recognized as the principal source of supply for Virginia which at one t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 40 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1986 When summer had ended and the wheat fields were waving with ripe golden grain, along came the oldfashioned threshing machine. This large steel machine was one of the most important pieces of farm equipment. Not every farmer had a threshing machine. There were only two in the valley where I grew up. The farmers gathered with suntanned faces covered with chaff to work with the threshing machine, in a community, until all the wheat was threshed, about 12 to 15 men, plus an extra one or two who tagged along for the meal. Then that crew rested and another crew took over. Farmers used the machine at harvest time to separate wheat from the stalks and hulls. It was driven by a tractor motor connected to it by a belt. The bundles of grain were thrown onto a huge belt and carried into the threshing machine part of the machine. Through a carriage or pipe, the straw traveled on the belt to a stacker. Here it was blown out to the stack or rick nearby. There mig...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 41 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

The following is an excerpt from "Miscellany" published in 1898 in Dallas, Texas and "Seven Decades Of My Life" published in 1913 in Dallas, Texas by James Reid Cole. It was submitted by a great-great niece and her husband, Dave and Peggy Nicholson of Greensboro, North Carolina. The Nicholsons would enjoy hearing from any descendents of this man and/or his family. They may be contacted at 5707-D Bramblegate Rd., Greensboro, NC 27409. THE FIRST DECADE On the 17th of November, 1839, I made my first appearance on the stage of action. I suppose the sun was shining, and the breezes were blowing, and the cocks were crowing, and there was much running to and fro. I suppose so, I don't know, I don't remember, though I know I was there. The first person I [knew] was the gentlest, sweetest woman in the world - my mother - Elizabeth Murphy Cole, and the first man that my gray eyes beheld was a soldier, planter and preacher - my father Major William Carter Cole. [His father was Robert Cole and ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 42 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1986 BACKROADS Continued from page 24 with many local residents, that the frescoes will not survive such a move. At this point the fate of these beautiful works of art is in limbo and if you have not visited Holy Trinity and seen them yourself I would suggest that you do so. They are remarkable works of art. Viewers of WFMY-TV in Greensboro, North Carolina or the CBS News Show, "Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt" have often been treated to the beautiful nature studies of cameraman Jim Waters. His work often focuses on the Blue Ridge and it has been my pleasure to spend a good many days with Jim, riding mountain backroads and often stopping while he captured on film such things as butterflies on daisies or old weathered buildings. Jim is a true lover of nature's beauty and it has added to my enjoyment to introduce him to some of my favorite out of the way spots. On each of our trips, his appreciation of Mountain beauty has been verbalized with an almost...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 43 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

The iron gate creaked on its hinges as I pushed it open and we entered the family cemetery. Warm June sunshine slipped through the trees and formed a dappled pattern on the grass that covered the graves. A hush hung over the place that even the birds in the nearby trees respected. My seven year old daughter flitted across the cemetery like a summer butterfly. I called her back and admonished her not to walk across the graves. We walked hand in hand through the country cemetery that was the final resting place for generations of my husband's family. My child, secure in her new-found knowledge of deciphering the written word, rambled ahead of me and read the inscriptions on the tombstones. I stopped and waited while she caressed a stone lamb that marked one of the graves. After a moment, she inquired "Mama, why do all these people have our name?" I explained that they were her ancestors - her father's people. I told her that they were born here in the mountains and had never moved awa...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 44 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1986

HEART OF THE BLUE RIDCE TAountaM Wlipf 1 " • A Copyright 1986 Laurel Publications Inc. JULY, 1986 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life TALL TALES "MOUNTAIN STYLE" PAGE 24 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. In last months BACKROAD tour I explained that we had just learned that our water system was contaminated and we had to relocate immediately. Anyone who has ever moved knows its no fun and that it involves a lot of work. Moving THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL was no exception. We were thrown off schedule and haven't fully recovered yet. For this reason I hope you will understand and bear with me this month as I repeat a BACKROAD tour that first appeared i...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1986

AUGUST, 1986 Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life It was in 1922, as near as I can recall the date, the last week in July. Six of us decided we wanted to climb the Pinnacles [of Dan] and have a horse back ride. Lillie Wood, Eunice Lipscomb (summer school teacher), Bonnie Webb, Thelma Webb, Matt Burnett, Clyde Wood and myself ended up going. The distance we would be going was about four and a half or five miles, so we left around one o'clock on the outing. Things went fine for us and we reached there in good shape. We left the horses at the foot of the little pinnacles and started to climb. This was very rough, just rocks to climb. The boys would pull and push to get us over the rough spots. We all made it to the top. It being a real hot day in July, we realized we didn't have any water with us. We made some pictures. All we could see was the mountains around us and the [Dan] river flowing between the pinnacles and mountains. It was such a nice scene, I wondered about our creator buildin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1986

PAGE 2 - THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL - AUGUST 1986 Editor's Note... Robert G. Back is the author of the book, "Hear My Laughter, See My Tears". It is available by writing Robert G. Back, Box 123, R.R # 1, Medarryville, IN 47947. The price is $7.50 plus SI.OO for postage and handling. There is only a limited number still available. Every morning at exactly nine o'clock, he came through Dwarf, Kentucky pulling a battered, squeaky wagon. Regardless of the weather, he always showed up with the promptness of an unwanted bill. A gnarled little man who stood barely five feet tall, he picked up chunks of coal that had fallen off coal trucks. He always wore a floppy brown hat, an over-sized, thigh length denim jacket and one brown brogan and one black one. Everybody called him Shorty Whiteoak. Shorty Whiteoak wasn't the little man's real name, but considering the fact that he didn't know what it was himself, it was as good as any. The story was that as an infant, he was found abandoned under a white...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1986

Daddy carried mail when routes outside of town were called "Rural Free Delivery". The routes were numbered and labeled R.F.D. #1 or #2, or a number in subsequent order. When he left his job helping build military installations in Virginia (Petersburg and Norfolk) during World War I and returned home to Mebane, North Carolina, to get married, he learned that he was eligible for a mail route. He had taken the examination sometime previously, passed it, and now his name headed the list. And so, I know that shortly after my parents' wedding date of April 30, 1918, he went to work at the Mebane post office. Daddy had a leg that had slipped when set after a break when he was a small child and because of the problem leg, he had been turned down for military service. A white horse named "Kelly" was hitched to the buggy and each weekday Daddy drove the 4 miles from farm into town to the post office, sorted the mail, and then set out on his route to the Hawfields community. If there was somet...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1986

PAGE 4 - THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL - AUGUST 1986 Impractical as it often was, Father liked to have his family accompany him on his various trips, when possible. This was sometimes accompanied by special invitations from members of his various churches. On many occasions, he took me with him, and I always was overjoyed to go, even if most of the journeys were only to Winifred Junction. It was at Winifred Junction that our entire family walked into the mouth of a whale - a carpeted one. The whale was exhibited on a boat that went from town to town along the Great Kanawha River. We walked onto the boat and down a flight of stairs to the platform covering the whale's lower jaw. The mouth, propped open with huge timbers, was so well camouflaged that Father said one could hardly realize that this was "a place similar to the entrance of Jonah's troubles." It was not until I had climbed back out and walked along the side of the monstrous mammal that I realized where I had been. I remember our fam...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1986

NEW PREACHER (Continued from page 4) Enoch should grow into the suit. About the same time, just before we moved to Parsons, Helen met with her misfortune. Shortly after school reopened in the Fall, my mother suddenly discovered, to her horror, that her elder daughter had lice. No doubt some child had carried them to school, but Mother was mortified. She kept Helen home to work on her hair with a fine-toothed comb, but after she thought they were all gone, the insect life reappeared. Mother became so desperate that she decided upon extreme measures. Ignoring Helen's tears and entreaties, Mother cut her hair off close to her head. The battle with the lice was quickly won, but Helen was embarrassed beyond words. In that day, long hair was a "woman's pride and glory," and her beauty and feminity were judged greatly by its length. Children who knew Helen's middle name now called her "Willie" all the time. "Willie" stopped appearing in public, keeping in hiding as much as possible. When s...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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