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Elephind.com contains 7,236 items from Richmond Australian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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TRAMSFORMATION OF CENTRAL SOUTH AMERICA. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

TRAMSFORil/IATIOH OF CEN TRAL SOUTH AMERICA. : J. Mr. Jo'.in D. Lcc'.tie has an article in January mnr.i.cr of "Chambers's Journal"-hi: h coinmcnces a new volume of this excellent monthly on the great transformation which has lately bem ta1.: nsc place in the central portion of South America.. He po'nts out that tho construction of now railv ays, from several direc tions, which w'Ul soon penetrate into the very heart of South America, is bound to give a great impetus to settlement and trade. Regions for merly very inacccst'ible will be'placed within sixteen to twenty days' steam communication from London. Every day sees greater facilities and greater comfort offered to the traveller, whilo distances are shortened. Where as a few months ago Argentina was -completely isolated, so far as rail way connection is concerned, from the other countries of South Ameri ca, railways have lately been com pleted, or are on the point of com pletion, which will place her in di rect communication wit...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CONFIRMATION. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

CONFIRMATION. Mrs. Citily: '-'Bridget, who was that at the door just now ?" Bridget : ''A leddy wantin' to know if we had furnished rooms." . Mrs. Citily : "What did you tell her ?" Bridget: "Sure, an' I towld her that all our rooms were, furnished. She's lookin' at tlie lib'ry now."

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PERHAPS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

PERHAPS. "The dog," said the pseudo-scien tific boarder, "steers himself with his/ tail, to a considerable degree." I'Uses it to guide his wandering bark, does he?" asked the Cheerful Idiot.

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A NEW TYPE OF TEA STRAINER. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

A NEW TYPE OF TEA STRAINER. The ordinary tea stra'iner has the j disadvantage of retaining a small quantity of tea in the mesh which ; then drips . on the tablecloth. This fault, says/"Popular Mechanics," is claimed to be overcome in a new -type of strainer placed on the mar ket in France. It is a rod of twisted wire with a tuft of finer wire at its. lower end. The method of inserting it in the spout of the pot is clearly , shown. The reason tea does not drip from the wire, as in the old type of strainer, is said to be because of the fineness and close jjroximity of the wires, ! the tea remaining in the tuft after ! pouring being drawn back into the spout by capillary-'-action. The millstone, discarded by a mill at Soutlx Dover, N.Y., many years ago, has beon a< subject of sur mise for years,i and seemingly, none of the surmises were fulfilled. After the stone had been discarded some time, a seedling popped its head through the eye, and, as the seed ling grew into a tree,...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HUNTING IN NEPAL. HOW THE MAHARAJAH SHOOTS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

HUNTING IN NEPAL. .- " - ? HOW THE MAHARAJAH SHOOTS. The method of shooting when the I Maharajah of Nepal gives a big shooting-party is that two or three regiments of soldiers are sent down from Katmandhu into the Terai to act as beaters, and that a vast num ber of elephants, of which there are plenty in Nepal, are collected. The whereabouts of a number of tigers are known, and an immense circle is formed of elephants, with -men in between as beaters. Little elephants, very qu'ick of foot, are used to carry the officers who regulate the closing , in of the enormous circle. There is a great noise of tom-toms and gongs,1 and shouting and firing OS of guns as the circle begins to close, and the tigers in the ring, hearing the' clamour, begin to move restlessly from place to place, look t ing for an opening, but being always headed back. The principal guest on his elephant has on either side of , him, on their elephants, two of the surest shots m India, to make quite certain that if a c...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CYNICAL. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

CYNICAL. Photographer : i'''I have been tak ing some moving pictures of life on your farm." Farmer : "Did ' you catch my la borers in motion ?" Photographer : "I think so." . Farmer: "Ah, well, science is a wonderful thing." The one think people can get with out money is drink. If you want to borrow five shillings it is quite a different matter.-Dr. Waldo. 1 - j Ninety per cent, of the visitors to a museum go in because it is rain ing outside.-H. D. Roberts. Don't trust the man who says his one ambition is to get rich.-E. W. 1 Markham*

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POSTAGE STAMPS. THEIR EARLY DAYS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

POSTAGE STAMPS. 1 A-* ^ THEIR EARLY.' *DAYS. | Ninjty nine out of every hundred persons wo'.ild probably ascribe the honour of having invented the postage stamp to Rowland Hill, but every one of them would be wrong. It was Hill who first brought to the notice of the Post Office Commissioners this useful method of simplifying: the transportation of letters, but as a matter of fact the stamp had been invented several years before by Mr. James Chalmers, of Dundee, who in August, 1834, experimented with an adhesive label for the franking of correspondence. Hill did not think of stamps until the beginning of the year 1S37, and it is remarkable that up to that time,. and, indeed, not till November of the same year, had Chalmers made any public mention at all of the labels he had actually printed and gummed three years ear lier. Even Chalmers, however, was not Qrst in the field with the idea of franWing letters at the beginning of their journey instead of at the end of it. So early as the ...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COST OF TRANSATLANTIC LINERS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

COST OF TRANSATLANTIC] LINERS. . 4 ' The first cost of Transatlantic pas senger steamers has been increased enormously during the last forty years. In 1874 a 15-knot steamer cost £200,000 ; in 1889 a 20-knot steamer cost £375;000 ; in 1893 a 22-knot steamer cost about £550,000 ; in 1899 the Oceanic, of 20.75 knots, with relatively good cargo cnpa;ity, cost £700,000 ; four years later a 23 kriot steamer, of about the same dimensions as the Oceanic, cost £800,000. For later ships authorita tive figures have not been publish ed, but certain statements indicate approximately the sums which have been spent upon them. The British Government granted to the Cunard Company a loan of £2,600,000 to wards the construction of ? the Lusi tania and Mauretania, and it is understood that the actual cost of the two1 vessels exceeded that amount. The outlay on the Olympic has been put at about cne and a half million pounds sterling by men who had cxact- knowledge .. of what che has cost. The Hamburg-A...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TANTALUM WRITING PENS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

! TANTALUM WRITING PENS. The excellent properties of tanta lum suggested ' the idea of 'using this metal for writing pens. Most of the pens now used are of steel, whose elasticity gives the desired pliability to the pens. But the-,steel pen rusts easily and is . attac'icd by ink. Gold is rust-proof and not so attacked. But gold alone is too soft for use in pen nil:s, anl tha extreme points must hive roxe hard metal like iridium soldered to them to make, rlhim durable, 'v>hi;h ' is a complicated ' and . espen' i.'c.. task.- Tantalum; was found to be a\ perfect substitute,, comlin'ntlii. pliable and elastic _ tenacity- of tha steel with the'chemical stability of the gold. Some very interesting tests have been made by Hcin';zs aud Blankert of Berlin. The tantalum imetal was cut, formed an 1 split like an ordinary steel pen. Then the i points were bent, ground shaped, and hardened by a'special hardening pro cess which was' found to greatly prolong the life ""of the pens. Com parative...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORLD-WIDE NOTES. "A" SANITARY DRINKING PUMP. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

WORLD-WIDE NOTES. I . M SANITARY DRINKING PUMP. i An ingenious adaptation of the ; jeanitary drinking, idea to the old fashioned country pump receiving its .supply of water from a well,, has been made by a rural mail carrier and inventor of Oblong, 111. Work ing the pump handle up and down three or four times fills the cylinder at the top. This cylinder holds a gallon of ? water,, which flows out through the spifegot and overflows the bubbling bowl. The amount of water pumped into the cylinder by the few strokes of the handle is sufficient to keep. the bowl bubbling long enough for three or four per sons to drink. ?'?'Popular Mechanics."

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FISHING AT BIARRITZ. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

FISHING AT BIARRITZ. In the neighbourhood of Biarritz, ,in South-Western France, an original method of taking fish from the sea has heen invented by the inhabitants along shore. Two poles forty or fifty feet tall, and placed eight or nine yards apart, are erected on the beach. By means of pulleys a con tinuous .line, running over the tops of the poles and attached also to the top of another pole placed 500 yards out in the sea, can be alter nately drawn either, shoreward or seaward. Short lines with hooks and bait hang from the main line, and when. they are loaded with fish the fisherman, sitting by his little cabin on shore, draws in his ."take," rebadts his hooks, and by pulling in the opposite direction replaces the row of baited lines in the sea. This apparatus is. called a "va et vient," or wgo and come."

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DIAMONDS IN AUSTRALIA. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

DIAMONDS IN AUSTRALIA. It may come as a surprise to many people to learn that there is valu able field being .worked in Australia, and parcels of .diamonds are regularly being sent to cutters in Amsterdam. It is said ' that Copeton, in New South Wales, promises to be an ac tive field for years yet. The allu vial diamond deposits occur in out liers of drifts of ancient rivers, cov ered over by later basaltic flow. These ancient streams extend over widespread areas, and the drifts and diamond washes are found chiefly resting on- the granite bedrock. The main Copeton working is the Deep Shaft Mine. It has been working with success for four years, and an nually thousands of carats of dia monds are won from it. Recently two trial: wash'ings were taken from a ri'ch face. One gave 490 dia monds and two boarts (black dia monds) as a result, and the other 417 diamonds. From another face washings produced parcel a which averaged two diamonds to the carat throughout, the returns. At the breaki...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OPIUM. THE SOMNIFEROUS POPPY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

0 P I U M. ---? THE SOMNIFEROUS POPPY. .. Opium is the milky juice which exudes from the seed-pods of the "papaver somniferum," the . somni ferous, or white, poppy. In Pareira's monumental work on medicines the virtues of the drug are thus described-"Opium "is undoubt edly the most important and valuable 'remedy of the whole Materia Medica. j For other medicines we have one or more substitutes,, but for opium, none. Its good effects are not, as is the case w'ith some valuable medicines, remote and contingent ;? but they are immediate, direct, and obvious; and its operation is not attended with pain or' discomfort. | Furthermore, it is' applied, and with | great success, 'to the relief, of mala i dies of every day's occurrence, some of which are attended with acutte human suffering/' . I The -somniferous poppy is indi genous .in. Asia, long cultivated in Egypt, Turkey, Persia, and India, and, more recently, in China' and Manchuria-, while the red poppy, which grows wild in certain pa...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TOMB OF OMAR KHAYYAM. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

TOMB OF GillAR KHAYYAM. :-J. Professor A. V. Williams Jackson, of Columbia University, in his new book just published, tells of a visit be paid to the tomb of Omar Khay yam, near Nishapur, in Persia. The book is entitled "From Constan tinople to the i-Iome of Omar Khay yam," and describes the Professor's travels in Tra;risca..casia and North ern Persia. Omar, it would ap pear, has not mudi honour in his own country in these days. Only half a dozen would kno .vof him, Professor .Williams says, and ih?n as "Doctor Khayyam," the scientist and astro nomer. They might possibly add that he was a philosopher and sage, but none would ^remember him as a poet His very name recalls the hated Sanncalip Omar an:! the Arab con quest ; and his wine-bibbing verses, except when given a strained mysti cal and allegorical interpretation by the Sufis, are taken literally ; while his freedom of thought in expressing his attitude toward the One .Eternal Being is looked upon as little less than blasphemy....

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HAD LOST OTHERS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

HAD LOST OTHERS. A' man was brought up at the local .police-court by a farmer, and accused of stealing some ducks. The farmer said he should know them anywhere, and went on to describe their- pecu liarity. "Why," said the magistrate, "they can't be such a rare breed ! I have some like them in my yard." "That'is very likely, your honour," said the farmer ; "these are not the only ducks of the same sort I have had stolen lately !" Cockroaches dislike turpentine, so sprinkle it freely where they congre gate, and they will soon disappear.

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LURING WILD ANIMALS. VARIOUS NOISES AND CALLS IMITATED BY INDIANS OF NEWFOUNDLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

LURING WILD ANIMALS. 1 VARIOUS NOISES AND CAULS IMITATED BY INDIANS OF NEWFOUNDLAND; The Indians have a call or tolc for nearly every animal. They can bring a fox right up to within 20 yards by making a sibilant noise produced by sucking the back of the hand. Reynard takes it to be the cry of a mouse in difficulties,-, and seldom fails to advance close . to the sound. ' . Stag caribou . are toled by grunt ing loudly in two different ways, a vocal effort which requires little skill or practice on the . imitator's part. The "herd" stag will quick-; ly answer the,caller and advance for a short distance, but the '''travelling" stag will come very close if the calls are properly made at suitable intervals. ? Wild geese can be called when they first arrive in the Spring, by waving a white. rag and imitating their "honking" call, but after the first fortnight they take little notice of the lure. A small white dog is also at; tractive to geese in the Spring, and one Indian I know has killed...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE COLISEUM. THE LAST WORD OF PAGANISM. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

THE COLISEUM. THE LAST WORD OF PAGANISM. The Coliseum is of brtck, faced with, stone. The Pantheon is brick, a coarse grey, brick in texture like a potter's sagger ; and its dome, the most" daring in the world, is of ce ment. - They say-"Roman cemcnt is ever lasting ." I add-"And everlastingly sombre .I took my first sight of the Coli seum' on my way to San Clement?. At my first view from the high ground where I stood I loo'ced at it almost midway. It seemed large ; but I had imagined it still larger. I clambered down the slopes and _stood close underneath it, in the gulf of its great shadow. Thence I lock ed up at it.1 It had meanwhile be come a great open-jawed Leviathan. Then I passed through one of its countless "vom'itoria." I remember ed that this was the Latin word for these outlets"; and the word oppress ed me. I stood for a momtnt dazed by the shadows. At a stroke all the yo'.inger buildings in this City of Ruins became toys by the side of this ruin. - Who could undertake t...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A MOUSTACHE THAT MADE A FORTUNE TRUE STORY OF THE GERMAN EMPEROR'S "BRISTLER." [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

A MOUSTACHE THAT MADE A FORTUNE -4 . : '? I TRUE STORY OP THE GERMAN.,. EMPEROR'S '''BR1STLER." The story of how_.a man made a fortune out of a moustache is as interesting as it is remarkable. Some twenty years ago there was attach ed to the German Emperor's mili tary staff a certain officer, by name Von Bencks, who was somewhat of a dandy. This Von Bencks was in the ha'iit of patronising a hairdresser by the name of Haby, and one day, on the occasion of some very special, cere mony in which the Emperor was tak ing part, he decided to surpass him self. Accordingly he gave instructions to Herr Haby that his mouslachs should! be trimmed in some entirely novel Way. Now, Herr Haby was a man of original ideas, and soon had Von Bencks's moustache pointing! ferociously! upwards towards his eyes.' If Von Bencks was delighted with the effect, he was even more so when the Emperor William himself noticed it in .thc procession, and publicly con gratulated him at the Royal l\an 'quet which follo...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

LOCAL DIRECTORY. FEDERAL PARLIAMENT. . The Senate is elected by tUe whole State. \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.'* Yarra Electorate - Hon. F.. G. Tudor, M.P. . STATE PARLIAMENT. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.. Melbourne East Province.-Hon. A. M'Lellan, M.L.C.; Hon. J. P. Jones, StI.L.C. LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. . Richmond Electorate.-Mr. E. J. Cotter, M.L.A. Abbotsford Electorate.-Mr. G. 0. Webber, M.L.A. OITY OF RICHMOND. The ? Richmond City Council meets on alternate Monday evenings, at the Tcwn Hall, at 7.30. COUNCILLORS. Mayor, Cr Gordon Webber, J.P. WEST WARD. G. W. Kemp, retires 1914.' D. L. Davies, retires 1915 SI. Alexander, retires 1916. NORTH WARD. B. Flevill retires 1914. H. H. Bell, retires 1915. : J. T.'Streefc, retires 1916. SOUTH WARD. George P. Beachcroft, retires 1914. W. Burgess, retires 1915. W. W. Gleadell, retires 1916. EASTWARD. Arthur A. Fear, retires 1914. C. ilorgan, retires 1915. G. D. O'Connell, retires 1916. CENTRAL WARD, a. (J. Webber, retires 1914, G. R. Admans, retires...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Australian — 20 June 1914

WEDDING COLLIER-JAMES. At the Central Methodist Church, Church street, on the afternoon of 10th.inst., Mr J. T. Collier (eldest son of Mr G. Collier, McGowan street) was united in matrimony to Miss Rosie James (eldest daughter of Mr J. C. James Church street North Richmond.) The ceremony was performed by Rev. T. B. Reed (Superintendent of Richmond Cir cuit.) The church was nicely decorated with ivy crysanthemums and palms. The bride, who was given away by her father, looked   charming in a pretty gown of crepe de chene, with Limerick lace, pearls and tulle ; a nice wreath of orange blossom was worn, and a handsome shower bouquet carried. The bridesmaids were Misses Vera and Lydia Collier (sisters of bridegroom)   and Ivy James (sister of bride) who looked very nice in dresses of cream foam. The groomsmen were Mr F. James (best man) Mr J James and Mr G. Collier The service was full choral, and as the party passed out of the church the organ pealed forth the ...

Publication Title: Richmond Australian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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