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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Heiress to £800,000. CHORUS GIRL AT £4 A WEEK. AN AMERICAN ROMANCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

Heiress to £800,000. CHORUS GIRL AT £4 A WEEK. AN AMERICAN ROMANCE. The fascination of the footlights has caused many persons to do miraculously unconven tional things, but surely no one. even with the record before him. could imagine bo strange a transformation as the one which it has ac tually wrought in the life of Katherine Roberts within the past few weeks. Miss Roberts is. first of all, the heiress to £S00,000. She has been reared in luxury to fill a position in society which was hers by herit age. She has been educated at the best schools in America, taking a finishing course at Miss MISS KATIIERINE ROBERTS. < Ely's fashionable establishment on Riverside ( Drive, New York. She speaks French, German, / and Spaniah as fluently as she does her mother ) tongue. > She has a fine taste in pictures and music, ) Daints and draws with more than the usual ) skill, is an excellent pianiste, and possesses a S 'well-cultivated voice. ) And she is working in the chorus of a N...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

THE WEEK. Somebody wrote a book some time ago tmder the title "The Things that Matter." That may be very well as a title, but it does not promise much foundation for a doctrine of life unless we could approximately agree ( .what "the things that matter" really are. ( 'According to some views recently brought ) Hinder discussion between our Federal Gov- ) ernment and the State Premiers, one thing ( iwhich matters a good deal is who are to have the right to nominate themselves and their political friends and supporters in the labor party to the Imperial Government for the purpose of receiving titles. In Melbourne just at present it seems that the head of the Commonwealth Govern ment and the Speaker of the State 'Assembly agree In holding that a thing •which really matters is which of them is to appoint a housekeeper to look after the Chamber. Then we had a member of the State Parliament here who lately gave proof that the thing which mat tered most to his conception of his political p...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STONE SHORTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

stone: shots. In 1478 the Sultan of Turkey, Mohammed II., at the siege of Scutari employed heavy bombards, the lightest of which threw a stone shot weigh ing 3701b., whilef two threw shote of 5001b., two 7501b., two of 8501b., one of 12001b., Ave of 13001b., and one the enormous weight of 16401b., or close on 15cwt. The only guns of modern' times whose' shot exceed this weight are the HO, 100, and 110 ton guns, which throw projectiles from 17001b. to 200Qib., of course with a much higher velocity than the bombards.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTABLE PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

NOTABLE PLACES. Brief descriptions, properly autobnti cated, of notable places throughout Aus tralasia, with accompanying rough sketches or photographs, will be accepted by the Editor of "The World's News/' and paid for at current rates.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ADVICE TO CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

ADVICE TO CHILDREN. Don't pull one end of a dog unless you want an introduction to the other end. Don't smoke. If it don't hurt you, your father -will. Always be good, and you'll die young, and save your parfehts no end of expense.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GOOD REASON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A GOOD REASON. It was a feminine voice that came over the telephone wire this time. "Is this the weather forecaster?" " Yee, ma'am. Cafa I do anything for you ?" "Yes, air. I would like to have you tell me how much lor^sr this humidity is going to last." "Pardon me, but why do you wish to know that?" ^ "Beckuee I washed "my hair a week ago, and I want, to tod out how much longer I've got to* ) wait for it to dr*.' '—Chicago "Tribune."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LINKS WITH THE PAST. NAPOLEON'S COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

LINKS WITH THE PAST. NAPOLEON'S COLUMN. A conspicuous memorial of Napoleon's futile attempt to invade Great Britain with a force of some 180,000 men and a huge flotilla stands near the railway, two miles from the town of Bou logne. It is known as the Colonne de la Grande Armee, its erection having been begfitti By the great army as a monument to Napoleon 1. The first stone war, laid by Marshal Soult in 1S04, but after the departure cf the troops its conatruc NAPOLEOX'S COLUMN. tion was discontinued. "When Liouis XVIII. as cerded the throne the work was resumed, but with a purpose wholly different to that of its originators. The design of Louis was to com memorate th(» Restoration of theBourbons, but the Revolution put an end to this, arid, subse quently, when the work was carried out, tj|e old idea was reverted to. The carved fl,eur»-de-lia and the various Royalist inscriptions having been effaced, it was dedicated in 1841 as a monument to Napoleon I., surmounted .by a bronze,statue...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Royalty and the Camera. SOME INTERESTING ANECDOTES OF ROYAL SITTERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

Royalty and the Camera. SOME INTERESTING ANECDOTES OF ROYAL SITTERS. : A well-known photographer, who ha*, perhaps, 1 taken more Royal photographs than any other 1 artist in the world, communicated the following j facts to a London "Express" correspondent. For ( obvious reasons ho does not wish his name to ( appear:— < "The Prince of Wales Is one of the easiest and i best-hearted sitters in the world. He makes ( himself at home, and you as well, at once; and ( leaves himself entirely in your hands. ( "A few years ago bis Royal Highness, then the < Duke of York, honored me by visiting my studio , quite unexpectedly, 'just to be "shot" for the fun . of the tbing,' as he himself remarked. 'Now, bow shall I be taken?' queried the Duke, throw ing himself into a chair. 'I want to look as free * and neglige as possible—juet as though I had got < a day off, don't you know, and didn't care a rap < for anything or anybody." ( "His Royal Highness jum...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WARNING SIGNS OF PARALYSIS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

WARNING SIGNS OF PARALYSIS. A strange and unexplalnable fact, but never theless true, is that those more frequently at" tacked by general paralysis are men, and among the most industrious class of men. There is probably no disease of such gravity in which the onset is more insidious. On looking back, when the physical weakness, etc.. have become marked, and the disease has declared itself, symptoms are remembered, lasting for years past, which by themselves seem trivial, and are looked on as mere ac centuation of personal peculiarities, but which, taken together, have the gravest significance. "Restless, unwonted activity, mental and phy sical, is of frequent occurrence; a feeling of superabundant energy, for wnich there appears no adequate relief; often undue irritability, which will not brook control or contradiction, an unreasonable demand upon the time and in dulgence of others; waywardness, fickleness, or outbursts of furious passion upon trivial pretexts in those who had previ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"DEAR" OLD TIMES. CHRISTMAS PUDDING ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

' "DEAR" OLD TIMES. i CHRISTMAS PUDDING ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. Present-day housekeepers have really very much to be thaukful for (says the London "Daily Mail"). Christmas cheer in these times is so plentiful and cheap, and o* such variety, that it seems impossible almost to think of a Christmas with out preserved or candied fruits, the luscious sultana, or puddings and cakes without the slices of tasty peel. Yet that it was so is shown by the old ac count books for 1801 in the possession of Messrs. Travers and Son, of Cannon-street. In an entry of December 24, 1801, can be seen what an extensive item the plum pudding was in those days. Currants were 9d, instead of 2%d per lb., sugar Is 3d, against lVfcd now, and spices for flavor ing were nine or ten times as expensive. After-dinner fruits ran still higher. French plums, now fetching 6d per lb., were spelt French "plumbs," and fetched lOd. Faro figs were 6d per lb., now they are l%d; prunes were double the price, while almonds were ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIS AUDACIOUS CHOICE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

' HIS AUDACIOUS CHOICE. "Yea," said the Fairy Prince, "you may have whatever you want for a Christmas present." "I will choose," said the Fortunate Person, "either a wife or an automobile." "How foolish!" exclaimed the Fairy Prince. "Why do you not select something that you can manage?" -"Baltimore American."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE JEWELS OF INDIAN PRINCES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

THE JEWELS OF INDIAN PRINCES. Some thipgs there are in this world which money cannot buy, and which even the influence of royalty is powerless to win. Among them are the priceless sets of Jewels belonging to the rajahs of India. Many of these princes of the Bast have sets of gems which represent a value unheard-of outside the Orient, and beside which the most famous collections of the crowned heads of Bur ope or of wealthy families sink into insigni ficance. It is not likely that a white man will ever wear these treasures unless they come to him il the spoils of war. It is against the most sacred traditions of the rajahs to part with their family heirlooms. Fabulous prices have been offered them for single Jewels or ornaments out of their vast supplies. But gold has no power to tempt them where their Jewels are concerned. The pearls and diamonds belonging to the Rajah of Dholpur rank first among all these costly collections. They form the most valuable set of Jewels in existence. It...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POPULARISING THE X RAYS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

POPULARISING THE X RA.1S. } The newest slot machine dispenses X rays to \ enable the passer-by to see the bones of hie hand. S The tube is put in action by the usual coin.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EARTHQUAKES IN MORMON COUNTRY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

EARTHQUAKES IN MORMON COUNTRY. —»— According to American papers, the Mormons have recently experienced a rather vigorous "sbaking-up." \ Beaver City, in the State of Utah, has been \ also entirely ruined by an earthquake, hardly ( a house in the town escaping some damage. [ The shock extended throughout all the south ? western districts of Utah. r At Marysvale, the entire population left their ( homes after the first shock, built bonfires in ' the streets, and camped out all night.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Complete Short Story. HER FATHER'S VENGEANCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

Complete Short Story. HER FATHER'S VENGEANCE. Henry Bellamy, banker, and millionaire, sat in hi£ study, frowning over the letter which lay open in bb hai.d, and scowling at tbe signature —"Your ioving daughter, Grace Verney." "I will never forgive them—never!" he Aid. Wben George Verney had sold his first Acad emy picture to Henry Bellamy two years before, he felt that his fortune was made. Bellamy's collection of pictures was world-renowned, and an artist whose work had found favor in the eyes of this man of millions 'was always certain of getting his price, perhaps eve& a little more tl>an his price, from the dealers for whatever ei*e he painted. Man of business though he was, with but little time to devote to the study of art, Henry Bel lamy had an intuition—almost an instinct—for the merits of a good picture which served him as well as, if not better than, great knowledge might have done, and it was his boast—& boast that fact bore out—that there was not a sin...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Stage in England AND IN AMERICA. WHAT CLEMENT SCOTT AND NAT GOODWIN SAY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

* ! The Stage in England > AND IN AMERICA. WHAT CLEMENT SCOTT AND NAT GOODWIN SAY. The Americas invasion of England, the most general topic in the British newspapers just now, extends ae well to the stage as to commerce &nd other lines of competition. The presence of a number of American actors and actresses in England, and the visit of several prominent English dramatic artists to the United States are affording the playgoers of both countries opportunities to institute mutual comparisons. In some respects Ameri can stage methods differ considerably from those adopted by English artists; even imported Eng lish plays have to undergo a certain amount of Americanising to please the Transatlantic palate. Whether this local "seasoning" is or is not beneficial to drama in general is a point upon which there is naturally a difference of opinion. Each country, of course, champions its own cause, and it is for no one to pronounce judgment. In one interesting particular, at any MI...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Invention of Bottled Beer. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

The Invention of Bottled Beer. ' In the middle of the sixteenth century (says a j writer in the "Globe"). Alexander Nowell, Doctor i of Divinity, waa; * headmaster of Westminster ( School, a prebendary of the Abbey, and the pos- 1 sessor of a charming country residence named 1 Redhall, situated near Clitheroe, Lancashire, | whither he was wont to retire during the holi days. Now Dr. Nowell was a staunch Protestant, so when Edward yi- died and Queen Mary sue- 1 ceeded to the throqe, he thought it prudent to for sake the cloisters of Westminster for Redhall Park, having a very shrewd suspicion that if he did not trouble might befall. The doctor was an enthusiastic and expert angler, and, thanks to the well-stocked trout streams running through his Lancashire demesne, he had every oppor tunity for indulging in his favorite pursuit One fine May morning, then, 6aw Noweil pre paring his rod and tackle, and, as it promised to be a scorching hot day, he, before starting out, took the precau...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FATTED CALF. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

THE FATTED CALF. The Prodigal's journeying home at last,' Oh! the Prodigal's on his way; And the Prodigal's family eta re aghast, With—a Hip, hip, hip—hurray! His family weep, oh! they weep for Joy; The friends of the family chaff; For it'a all very well for the Prodigal boy. But it's rough"on the fatted calf! - ■ The dutiful Prodigal's far from meek, And the fatted calf dreams of steel! Though he won them a prize on cattle-show Week, The family talks of "veal." Although with the "other eye" slyly shut, , /The onlookers merrily laugh, Oh! it's all very well for the Prodigal—but It is rough on the fatted calf!

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SOLEMN MAN'S STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

\ THE SOLEMN MAN'S STORY. <, ( The other evening, at a well-known hotel, A ( number of travelling men were spinning yarns. ( md the talk turned upon self-sacrifice and the ( privations Rood friends had undergone to contri ( bute to the worldly success of an associate. \ One solemn-faced man told the following: — ; "I had two schoolmates," he began. "One of ) them was aspiring to be a lawyer, and the other ) had aspirations for a high place in the medical ) profession. The college we attended was one at ) which the discipline was severe, and the re ( auirements for graduation exacting. Welh ( those two boys managed to worry along until the ( day of the final examination came. The young ( law student had perfected himself in his studies, / and was likely to. pass with high honors. The ( medical student, however, was in a far less en ) viable plight. He found that the ^caminatioh ) would be for the most part upon the anatomy ol ) the '.eg, and this was the one branch of the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW VIOLETS AFFECT THE THBOAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

HOW VIOLETS AFFECT THE THBOAT. «— In connection with the recent supposed dis covery that a decoction of violets is a cure for cancer, it is interesting to remember that a few years ago a good deal was said as to the per nicious effects of violets upon the voice. A celebrated singer who was presented with a bouquet of Parma violets and inhaled their perfume was subsequently unable to sing, the vocal cords having been partially paralysed. A teacher of singing observed that such pupils as attended her lessons wearing violets were never in good voice, and upon examining their throats she found them swollen and scaly. The great vocalist Faure. in his book upon the hygiene of the voice, named the violet as one of the singer's three greatest enemies, alcohol and tobacco being the other two.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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