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Title: Bowral Free Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 18,602 items from Bowral Free Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE LATE QUEEN'S WILL [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

THE UTE QUEEN'S WILL Queen Victoria lias, by her will, the " World" states, bequeathed both Bui moral Castle and Osborno House to the King. It waB always Her Majesty's special desire that her Highland home should continue to be the Royal resi dence, and, of course, Oaborne would be far too large and expensive a place for any of the Royal Family except the Kini' to keep up. Her Majesty naturally wishes Princess Henry of Battenburg to continue to be associated with the Isle of Wight, on account of the Princess holding the position of Governor of the island, and also of Prince Henry of Battenburg being buried in Whipping ham Church. Consequently two small houses 011 the Osborne Estate have been left to Princess Beatrice. It is also supposed that the Queen had made provision for both her daughters Princess Christian and Princess Henry of Batten burg. Having a town house of ilieir own, the Duke and Duchess of Connaught will continue to have Bagshot Park as their country residence, and th...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Origin of " He's a Brick." [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

Origin of "He's a Brick."' The average man who uses the expres sion "He's a brick" is probably not aware of the fact that he is quoting from no leBR an authority than Plutarch, who in his life of Lycurgus uses the words to describe the Spartan law-giver. Lycurgus once said of Sparta, "The eity is well fortified, which has a wall of men instead of brick," and a king of Sparta, showing the city to an am bassador, remarked: " There thou belioldest the walls of SpaTta, and every man a brick." The ordinary life of a locomotive is thirty years. Perhaps it would live much longer if it didn't smoke so much.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
War Despatch in the Year 2000. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

War Despatch in the Year 2000. General Shilling, to the Secretary of State for War, January 1st, 2000: We managed to get within fifty miles of the enemy to-day, and opened fire. Unfortunately, tho guns I possess have ,only a range of forty miles; but the enemy, alarmed at our progress, evacuated their position. A convoy of the enemy was oaptured yesterday after a severe fight. Half a mile from the ground their airships were taken, with supplies. We have this minute got within range again, and the fight is proceeding, and I will wire again in twenty minutes and let you know the result of the movement. Please send me with the next supplies one thousand more Victoria Crosses, as I am running rather short, and the men are earning the award in scores every day.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Fly Nuisance. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

The Fly Nuisance. The great secret of success in keeping these insect pests out of the house, is in beginning the battle early in the season. Go over the house in the morning, and with a wet cloth kill every fly, which is certain to seek the warmth of the sunny window-panes; this will prevent the hatching of hundreds later on, for naturalists assert that 600 is only the average brood for a single fly. The other places where they aTe most likely to deposit their eggs are in the dust which gathers, even in the most cleanly house, behind books in the book-cases, in the space between double windows, and behind the weights and cords of the windows. These are places, too, where other insects are apt to lurk, so that it will pay for a sharp look-out for every possible pest while in search for the harmless but annoying fly.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Dead Man Spoke. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

The Dead Man Spoke. Scene: Aldershot Camp. Bearer Company of the Volunteer Army Medical Corpa ia going through a course of training, some Tommies of a regiment in camp having been detailed to play the part of dead and wounded. A Tommy with hiti head bandaged is brought by bearers to the hospital tent. Bearer (reporting): ' Severe aoalp wound, air, accompanied by insenai bility.' Surgeon: ' Well, what have you done ?' Bearer : 'DreaBed the wound, air, and given him iome whisky and water.' Surgeon : ' Whisky and water 1 How did you expect ati inaenaible man to awallow that V Bearer: ' He aaked for it, air.' The ordinary wmnau ia either in fashion or in misery.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Twenty-Four o'Clock. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

Twenty-Four o'Clook. According to a decree recently issued in Spain, the hours there are counted Bince the 1st January from one to 24 each "day, beginning at midnight. The Government offices, the telegraph, the telephone, railway, and steamship linoB have been direoied to observe the new method. There are people who would like such a change recognised in this country, but we are afraid that the change would be too radical to become popular, It might be useful so far as railways are concerned, but, then, moBt people have something else to do besides travelling by rail and studying time tables.' For 99 out of every 100 acts mid appointments outBide of those con nected with the railways there is no confusion arising from the present system. When we read that a leoture is to begin at 8 o'clock, no one thinks it is in the morning ; and if Mary Smith should write to say that she will call at 11 o'clock, almost any one would expect to see her in the forenoon, even if she did not add "a.m."...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BY THE HEARTH. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

BY THE HEARTH. Bt J. B. m. Wuioht. Softly fades the sunset, Shadow* longer grow, Brightly shines the firelight, With its golden glow ; Touch with gentlo fingers All the irory keys, Waking from her slumber Olden harmonies. Sweetly float the echoes Through the room again, With their gentle magic Banishing all pain, Bringing many a vision Of the days of yore, And of olden voices Silent evermore. Fall the gathering shadows At the close of day ; Stars will soon be shining With their silver ray. Sweet it is to gather Round the hearth in glee, Thinking of the absent, Wheresoe'er they be.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMERICAN WORKING METHODS V. BRITISH. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

AMERICAN WORKING METHODS V. BRITISH. One of the many reasons why American manufacturers are so success ful competing in foreign markets is to be found in the following episode, which occurred recently An American manu facturer of steam specialities was visiting an English firm which made similar goods. A certain article which both firms made was under discussion. ' What is your price on this thing V asked the American. ' Well, in your money about 19 dollars,' replied the Englishman. 1 What does it cost you?' 'I'll deliver at your door all you want at 7 dollars apiece,' said the American. ' How in the world do you do it ?' 'Well, I'll illustrate,' answered the American. 'Look out of that window and across the street. See that man painting a sign ?' ' Yes.' ' He's on a ladder, isn't he ?' ' Yes.* 'See that other man sitting on the sidewalk holding the foot of the ladder V ' Yes.' •Now, in America we hare ladders that stand up by themselves—don't need a man to hold them. So, you see, i...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How Will The World End? [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

How Will Tbe World End? The opinions of many scientific men, and of imaginative writers, as to how the world will end, are gathered together in a most readable paper by Mr. Herbert 0. Fyfe, in a recent number of " Pear son's Magazine." " Mr. Fyfe discusses theories of such men as Lord Kelvin, who predicted that the world was doomed to die of sufFocation; of Mr. Nikola Tesla, who thinks that we may set fire to the atmosphere with our electrical dis charges ; of Mr. H. G. Wells, who conceives that intense cold will end life on the world; of Sir William Crookes, who thinks that our food supply will fail; and of others who have predicted the end of the world through collision with a comet, or the supremacy of the beast creation over man. One of the most novel theories discussed is that of M. X. Stanier, the celebrated Professor of Geology, who puts forward the idea that man will die of thirst. " Mr. Stanier allows that the idea of mankind dying from thirst seems para doxical when we con...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Heathen Chinee. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

The Heathen Chinee. The heathen Chinee, who is nothing if not economical, has an ingeniously simple method of eating his cake—or, rather, in the Celestial translation, drinking his tea. He drinks the delicate first infusion, and then dries the leaTes again; packs them in those mysteriously lettered boxes we know, nnd exports them to the Western barbarian, who, he has found'out, likeB his tea strong and stewed. It is true that the tannic acid apt to come out of the leaf in the second infusion may injure the British, stomach. That is not John Chinaman'B business; he knows the beauty and profit of the adulteration. Even the knowledge of this on the part of English people is not likely to affect our importation of tea. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, there fore, need not worry.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Machinery and Men. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

Machinery and Men. The machinery in the mills and factories of Great Britain alone is equal to doing the work of 700,000,000 men— more than all the adult population of the world. The single little State of Massachusetts has machinery enough to do the work of 50,000,000 men. Statis tics show that 500,000 men, with the aid of machinery, now do the work which required 16,000,000 men a few years ago. And this power is rapidly increas ing. The machinery of the United States is doing the work of one billion men. To-day one man and two boys can spin as much cotton as 1,100 spinners could have done 100 years ago. Ono weaver does the work of 54.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

Tho best cough drops are drops ol Ayer's Cherry Pectoral. Tho noxt timo you take cold, doso your solf with a lot of homo remedies and dilly-dally along un til your cough is doop-soated and you are tliroatoned with pneumonia .or con sumption. -That's • ono way, to bo sure. pore's another -yvay; Take /K^q r?s Cherry Pectoral at bedtime and bo all right the noxt morning. Isn't this tho bettor way? Then continuo tho Cherry Pectoral a few days until your throat and lungs have completely healed and all danger ol future trouble is past. Another grand tiling about Ayer's Cherry Tectoral is that it cures hard coughs, the liardosfc kind of old coughs, even af tor all othor remedies have failed. Put up in largo and small bottles. Whon it hurts your lungs to cough, then apply ono of Ayer's Cherry Pec toral Plasters directly ovor tho painful lung. It will quiet tho pairrfroinovq all congestion, and greatly strongthon. Prepared by Dr. J. C. Ayer Co., Lowell, Mass., U. S. A. • THE " -v SANATORIUM ...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOBILITY OF AUSTRALIAN WOMEN.. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

NOBILITY 01? AUSTRALIAN WOMEN.. v Io-tbe old times the bush wives, from, the highest to the lowest, made their homes, so to speak, with their own hands. The squatter's wife, who later came to her. town house and her carriage, did all her own work cheerfully when she,had to do it, aud is rarely ashamed to acknowledge the fact — refers to it, indeed, with a wistful, tenderness of voice and heart that plainly tells.how slis compares the hard times with theeasyoaen. And after that cataclysm of; a few years— the Bursting of tho Boom—when the revels of riches 'were bo. rudely interrupted, , as if somebody hftd'-turned the giis off suddenly, what cfid we see ? The girls'who had never bad: to work,.who had seemed to live entirely for pleasure, who appeared to us eaten up with the.frivolity of their luxurious lives, a3 soon na their great houses fell, iustoad of sitting, down to mourn and weep, over whelmed with the shame of such a tremend ous social ' come, down,' turned to, like Britons, i...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BOWRAL MUNICIPAL COUNCIL. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

BOWRATj MUNICIPAL COUNCIL. Meets every alternatec'fImiHtlay,, at "llio-Council • f/hambora, at 7.30 p.mf • ' Clerk's office horns are : Tuesdays, from 10 to 12 a.m.(Wednesdays, 7 to U p.m. : ■Fridays, 3 to . 5 p.m. * . . . • ■ Alderman W. Murray, Mayor.' ; Mr. W;-;R.:Parrow, council dork.' • ■ • «

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RAILWAY INFORMATION. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

RAILWAY- INFORMATION. Passenger trains arrive at l?o*vral from Sydney _ 11.47 p.m. daily, Saturdays excepted : ; ■ 7 87 ft.m. (l'aper Train) daity, Simduy cxcepted ; 11.12 a.m., Saturday only 12..# p.m. daily, Sunday excepted.• fi.iSSJ p.m., Saturday only • 7,68 p,m. daily, yiiumlny find Sunday excepted .. ] -j 9.28 p.m., Sutui-day only Passenger trains leave Bowrnl for Sydney . •>1 > <■ 3.0 n.ni. dniiy, Monday excepted ■ 0 50 a.m. Sunday only, stops; Mittagong mid ' Slrathfield only 7.3 a m. daily, Sunday excepted. • 8.82 a.m.' dnily, Sunday and Monday excepted, stops Mittagopg and StrulliUoldiOiily. . 8-31 a.m. Monday only, stops Jliliajjong, I'icton, (Jrunvillo, and Strathlicld only. 1.31 p.m, dajly, Sunday excepted.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW THE TENTH CENTURY ENDED. It Was Driven Out by Pestilence, Famine, and Other Miseries. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

HOW THE TENTH CENTUM ENDED. It Was Driven Out by Pesti lence, Famine, and Other Miseries. BY GEOBGE GRIFFITH. If a man standing, at it were, on the verge of the twentieth century were' to be miraculously endowed with infinite time vision so that he could look back to the 31st of December a.d, 1000, he would behold the strangest, and at the Bame time, the most awful spectacle which the whole European history, perhaps even the history of the world itself, affords. You do not read anything about this ,in school-books. Even in the more profound historical works you will not find much more than a passing mention of it. You have to go back to the old contemporary chronicles themselves to learn, the full horror of the most awful year in human history, the year 1000. Our seer through the centuries would behold the mediaeval world as an alternation of battle-fields and wilder nesses; plague, pestilence, and famine marching on the flanks and in the rear of devastating armies. Fields, which ha...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

Removed! Removed I Has removed to WORK COMMODIOUS PliEMI. SES nest to HILL BllOS. Conch Building und Horse Shoeing puriod out irv beat stylo. » •• . A SILVER WATCH FOR NOTHING. rE hereby undertake to give one of our FAM OUS SILVER WATCHES liatod at £2 'is, (Lady's or Gentleman's), to every MAN, WOMAN, or CHILD who sends us the correct reading of tho following PUZZLT3:— 0 * R; Ea ST :a _ GV«T. : The only condition is that if your answer is:'. cor rect you purchase one of our STERLING. SILVER CHAINS to wear with the Watch, SENi), NO MONEY./ Simply forward your answer with stamp ed addressed envelope for reply, and we inform you if you have won a watoh. Wo are making this offer to advortiso our goods throughout Australia: . Nck duty. . ■ Addrexs— JULIAN BRANDT, (From Paris and Geneva.) . 113Victoria Parade," East Melbourne, 1187 -• . Victoiia.. DONE j 1 J J Order.s for ^ J\ any \ *7 lescription of V* time AND 2-,FroffiSr'S J Bowral. \ . DONlli WM. BEER, RIGHT Proprietor $ MR. W. N. WIL...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KANGALOON. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

KANGALOON. By " Spero Meliora." On Tuesday night last the Rev. E. J. Piper missionary deputation from China   delivered a very interesting address on the "Strange ways of a strange people," in the Methodist Church at Kangaloon. The atten dance numbered about 150. The speaker gave his hearers an excellent explanation of his subject, and the terrible atrocities performed by these heathenish people. To fully illustrate his subjeot two ladies and three gentlemen were attired in the various Chinese costumes. The Rev. F. J. Branch who occupied the chair gave the speaker a very hearty vote of thanks for his well explained lecture, the meeting then closed with the Benediction.   The usual monthly meeting of,-the Band,, of Hope was held in the Methodist .'Church' on Friday night last. Mi*.' A. Thompson, vice-Presiduut, occupjed the chair. The following pi'ogrftmmo'was.submitted.'to the audience Song, Miss Avie Piper; solo, iS^iss. M> 'Noble j. recitation, Miss Ki...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW SOUTH WALES CAVES. COLONG CAVES, NEAR BURRAGORANG. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 26 February 1902

NEW SOUTH WALES CAVES. COLONG CAVES, NEAR BURRAGORANG. By "Tourist." The eastern portion of Australia is rich in cave systems, mostly in limestone formations, several, such as the Jenolan, Yarrangobilly, and Wombeyan, being of considerable extent, although only par- tially explored. Most of the caves, which are generally of a highly pic- turesque character, are in charge of caretakers appointed by the Government, a necessary precaution in view of the vandalistic tendencies of certain classes of visitors. Other caves are situated on private property, but obstacles are   rarely, if ever, placed in the way of those desirous of visiting them. Among the more recent discoveries are those of the Colong Caves, near Burragorang. The main caves are entered by openings in the face of the cliff. The Key Cave is from 60ft. to 80ft. wide, and 200ft. long, with a height of perhaps 70ft. Its arched roof is decorated with tinted stalactites. The stalagmitic deposits are also tinged with...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 1 March 1902

IN LESS THAN SIX YEARS WEBBER'S VITADATXO Has Covered Several Continents. READ WHAT IT IS DOING. Another Triumph. FOIt "Vita,clatio. Gall Stones Again Conquered. 21 Cla.Tton Street, Balmain, October 17,1900. Mr. S. A. PALMER, Dear Sir,—I feel.it my duty in the interest of humanity to let you know the great benefit I have received through Vitadatiq. I have. been. a. martyr to gall storips for a! long while. I was treated by, a medical doctor every day. I was unable to, go, out of. doors, thus being unable to follow my usual opoupation. The doctors failed to cure; me. I. was in extreme pain, vomiting and purging. My lifo was a burden to me. One day in picking up a paper one of your handbiljs was in it of a lady, who, had been cured, of gall. stones, the. symptoms of the patipnt. being similar to my own, I thought I would try it. A' bottle was.brought to me. It acted like a charm, and in a few. days I was out of.bed, free from the pain. I. took three large bottles, and can honestly say...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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