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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

V; The Indian Advocate. 148 from another, no man as such can claim the personal and in herent right to control his fellow-man. How, then, shall so ciety, composed of such unqualified men, have a right to im pose any kind of obligation upon me? A thousand fraudu lent dollars put together do not make genuine money. And do not tell me that to live in society is a necessity of my na ture. I have to obey the laws" that are the only guarantee and preservation of social order. For if that necessity is not positively created by God, I am simply the slave of a blind fatality. Now, fatality can constrain, but not "oblige" me; so that if life in the present conditions seems to me some what hard to stand, it is my perfect right to put an end to it; it being understood that, should I consent to live on, I will observe such laws as suit my purpose and will reject such of of them as restrain in any way my free will. And I defy any free-thinker to reasonably reprove me, or any man of the law to jus...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

149 Thk Indian Advocate. orderly act, by destroying harmony, goes to retard fhe time when human generations will enjoy perfect happiness in this world; that we should, by self-restraint and personal devo tion to the public good of society, hasten that glorious day when the sons of men, guided by pure philosophy and tied by an undying fraternal love, will embrace each other in mutual admiration. Whether or not the world is morally improving, we pass over the question. But vev claim that, should the assertion be true, future generations have no hold on our con science, since they do not actually exist. As we have demon strated above, no living society of men, regardless of God, possesses any authority of its own to enact laws restricting my liberty. How much less a society of the future! And what a consolation, indeed, for the afflicted man and the poor laborer who, deprived of their faith by fat free-thinkers, have no hope of a better life hereafter; neither anticipate a change of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

The Indian Advocate. 150 would signify his will by dictating the terms of the law and at the same time .show a complete indifference about it by neglecting to enforce it. That such a sanction is wanting in our Godless Moral Law is evident from the simple considera tion that, having no authority to command, it has no right to punish. Cantaber. CONTINWKI). PILGRIMAGE TO MARY. THE DEPARTURE. To the altar of Mary We are wending our way; Virgin tender and loving, Grant us a beautiful day. Cold and hard though this age be, Thou hast loved it alway; On our pilgrimage smiling, Grant us a beautiful day. Oft times, angels of darkness Jealous, trouble our way; Virgin, be thou our guardian, Grant us a beautiful day. Soon within thy shrine kneeling, All our love we can say; To thee we will be faithful, Grant us a beautiful day. Then within its sweet shelter Show thy love while we pray; Art thou not our dear Mother? Grant us a beautiful da v. THE RETURN. Sweetest pledge of our journey, Dearest jo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

15 1 The Indian Advocate. THE CHURCH IN GERMANY DURING THE PAST CENTURY. The Holy Year has brought much joy into the hearts of all Catholics. In England the Church has entered into a new era of glory, and the vigor and power English and Irish Catholics have displayed in spreading the true Gospel are equalled only by their patriotism. Their example has excited religious emulation on the Continent and in the Colonies, and has done inestimable good to men of good will. But if success has been gained by the Church it has, in most cases, only been obtained after hard struggles. Perhaps nowhere has persecution been so oppressive during the past hundred years as in Germany. A few words on the sufferings and courage of our German Catholic brethren may, perhaps, not be out of place at this time. It cannot be denied that the Catholics of Germany had grown indifferent towards the close of the eighteenth century. They, too, were poisoned by the atheistic atmosphere of Vol taire and his school; ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

wmrgit Kxn'""' 'i ((vw Tin: Indian Advocate. 152 all property belonging to the foundations, abbeys and monas teries within their states, and to dispose of it at their discre tion in providing public worship (Protestant) and instruc tion, in founding useful institutions, and " restoring their own finances." In this way the whole of the temporal possessions of sev eral bishoprics were disposed of. Unfortunately, most of the bishops died during the first fifteen years of the century; their chairs remained vacant, and it seemed as if the Church was doomed to the same fate as the old empire which had been dissolved in 1806 on the death of Francis II. But the more grass is cut, the more vigorously does it grow. In spite of the diabolical doctrines and the growing power of the illuminati, the Church continued. Voltaire, Kant and Weishaupt had caused men of brain and thought to consider religious matters, and these considerations brought many illustrious converts to the Church, foremost amo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

igjjnup-TCiiair-vj sijr- l53 Thk Indian Advocate, mmmmmmmmmm work under such conditions, and the King of Prussia was so infuriated by their opposition that he created a new bishopric and chapter at Breslau without even announcing the fact to the Pope. The year 1813 is memorable in European history; on the 18th of October Napoleon was beaten in the battle of L.eip sic by the united forces of Prussia, Russia, Austria and many of the minor dukedoms and principalities then existing in Germany. In 1815 the sovereigns of Prussia, Russia and Austria formed the "Holy Alliance," promising to govern their peo ples "according to the principles of Christianity," and recog nizing the "Divine Redeemer, Jesus Christ," as the sole sov ereign of the world. In 1840 the rulers of these very coun tries insisted on the restoration of Palestine to the Turks. The disputes between Vicars-Apostolic and the civil au thorities grew more bitter as time went on; but gradually the German potentates were prevaile...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

inw The Indian Advocate. 154 FLIRTATION. Flirting is a sign of woman's inferiority. It is a survival of the age when women, in order to secure a mate, had to re sort to the devices of the lower creatures of the forest and the field. Among the arts of the civilized women of to-day flirt ing should be as obsolete as are the wooden spears and cross bows of centuries ago. To the. high-minded woman love is so sacred a thing that she will not in any way treat it lightly or make any pretense in the matter. Thus does she make her love the more prized when she at length bestows it, and thus she saves herself heartaches and regrets. If you value your respect, don't flirt. It is a cruel game, and never worth while. If you want amusement, get it in tennis, golf, boating, cycling and pleasant friendships, but leave flirtation severely alone. Healthful sports are good for all, but the "scalp hunting" some girls indulge in lowers themselves and always causes misery. No girl should allow particular...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

155 Thk Indian Advocatk, BALANCING ACCOUNTS. A thickset, ugly-looking fellow was seated on a bench in the public park, and seemed to be reading some writing on a sheet of paper which he held in his hand. "You seem to be much interested in your writing," 1 said. "Yes; I've been figuring my accounts with old Alcohol, to see how we stand." "And he comes out ahead, 1 suppose?" "Every time; and he has lied like sixty." "How did you come to have dealings with him in the first place?" "That's what I've been writing. You see he promised to make a man of me, but he made me a beast. Then he said he would brace me up, but he has made me go staggering around and then threw me into the ditch. He said I must drink to be social. Then he made me quarrel with my best friends, and to be the laughing stock of my enemies. He gave me a black eye and a broken nose. Then 1 drank for the good of my health. He ruined the little 1 had and left me 'sick as a dog.' " "Of course." "He said he would warm me up, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

Thk Indian Advocate. 156 LOCALS. L JSA U-ii. .. Rev. Fr. Stanislaus, O. S. 13., will make his home with good Father Isidore for some time. -Mgr. Meerschaert went to Europe. II is nephew, Rev. G. Dupreitre, is his traveling companion. Sr. Mary de Sales died in Krebs, I. T., March 27th, and was buried at Sacred Heart, March 28th. R. 1. P. Brother Frank McGough, with the firm of WilUius & Co., of Milwaukee, Wis., made us a pleasant visit. Rev. Fr. Meinrad is stationed pro ton in Norman, Okla., till the return of the Pastor from his trip abroad. Rev. Fr. Germanus and Mr. Warner, of Shawnee, Okla., and Rev. Fr. William, of Puicell, I. T., paid a flying visit to Sacred Heart. April i6th, Mr. Frank Barnickle and Miss Josephine Mosler were united in the holy bonds of mauiage, Rev. Fi. Blaise, 0 S. B., officiating. That Si. M. Thomas, the Supeiioress ot St. Benedict's School at Shawnee, may soon tecover from hei illness, is the wish and prayer of her many friends. We are sorry indeed to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

157 19011 1. 2. 3- 4-5-6. 7 8. 9 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25 26. 27. 28.x 29. 30. 31- , ""T-? t- The Indian Advocatb. CALENDAR. . 1901 MAY. SS. Philip and James Apostles D. 2 cl. St. Athanasius Bp. C. D D. Finding of the Holy Cross D. 2 cl. St. Monica Wid D. Fourth Sund. after Easter, St. Pius V. Pp. CD. St. John before the Latin Gate D. maj. St. Stanislaus Bp. M D. St. Michael's Apparition D maj. St. Gregory Nazianen Bp. CD D. St. Antoninus Bp. C D., St. Majol Abbot O. S. B D. Fifth Sunday after Easter Semid. Rogat. Day. St. Hugh Abbot O. S. B D. Rogat. Day. St. Paschal Pp. C. O. S. B D. Rogat. Day and Vigil. St. Peter M D. Ascension Day D. 1 cl. with Oct. St. Paschal Babylon C D. St. Venantius M D. Sund. St. Peter Celest. Pp. C. O. S. B D. St. Bernardin of Siena C Semid. St. Dunstan Bp. C. O. S. B D. St. Romanus Abbot O. S. B ' D. Octave of the Ascension D. Our Lady Help of Christians D. maj. Vigil of Pentecost Semid. Whit Sunday 4 . D. 1 cl. wit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

m Vol. XIII. The Indian Advocate JUNE, 1901. INVOCATION. O Sacred Heart! O Love divine, Am 1, dear Lord, a child of Thine? And may 1 claim Thee e'en as mine? Lord, bring me near Thee, at Thy side, Thy hand my course to safely guide O'er life's too oft temptations tide! Dear Savior, make my heart Thy care; O, keep and save me from despair, That 1 each day for heaven prepare. Each morning, Savior, Lord, I pray Thy tender, loving hand to stay My faltering feet along Thy way Full of the dimly lighted way That leads to that eternal day, Which brighter, brighter grows for aye ! When faint and worn and w.eary grown, Lord, leave O leave me not alone! Nay, bring me nearer to Thy throne. -. C. Pel ton.. No. 6

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

s"!?? 159 Thi: Inijian AmocTJi,. THE PAIUTE, WASHO AND PIT RIVER TRIBES. SKETCH OF THE PAIUTE.' I'HARACITRlSTICS. At The Paiute belong to the, great Shoshonean stock and Q t occupy most of Nevada,, together with adjacent portions ot V", southwestern Utah, northwestern Arizona and northwestern 7 and southeastern California. The Pahvant and Gosiute on their eastern border are frequently, but improperly, classed - y as Paiute, while the Chemehuevi, associated with the Walapai ' t' in Arizona, are but a- southern offshoot of the Paiute and speak -' v the same language. With regard to the Indians of Walker ""' River and Pyramid Lake reservations, who constitute the k main bodyof those commonly known as Paiute, Powell claims ,, that they are not Paiute at all, but another tribe which he ,V calls Paviotso. He says; ''The names by which the tribes ""'Ny .are known to white men and the department give no clue to K '?& the relationship of the Indians. For example, the Indians - ; , J. in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

F& 7l5p!T TTSWwr'T'"Sr w &QrZ!M&l?Hlr,rf-' ' Tun Indian Advocatk. 160 r Ct - who died a -few years ago, and Natchez. Wovoka's leader ship is spiritual, not political. The Indians of Walker river and Pyramid lake claim the Bannock as their cousins, and say that they speak the same language. As a rule they have been peaceable and friendly toward the whites, although in. the early sixties they several times came into collision with miners and emigrants, hostility being frequently provoked by the whites themselves. The northern Paiute are more warlike than those of the south, and a considerable number ot them V- . . took part with the Bannock in the war of 1878. Owing to the fact that the great majority of the Paiuteare not on reserva ' tions, many of them being attached, to the ranches of white ( men, it is impossible to get any correct statement ot their 1 population, but they may be safely estimated at from 7,000 to to 8,000, and are thought to be increasing. In 1893 .tho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

"Vi'l"'ltr'yfvfi'-r) rjyr7r'gi-olc- ? jjwq - rv- mn ?,,? jn t 161 The Indian Aivoca'ie. as laborers on the farms of white men in all seasons, but they are especially serviceable during the time of harvesting and haymaking." Co?nr., 46.) They would be the last Indians in the world to preach a crusade of extermination against the whites, such as the messiah religion has been represented to be. Aside from their earnings among the whites, they derive their subsistence from the fish of the lakes, jack rabbits and small game of the sage plains and mountains, and from pinon nuts and other seeds which they grind into flour for bread. Their ordinary dwelling is the wikiup or small rounded hut of tule rushes over a framework of poles, with the ground for a floor and the fire in the center and almost entirely open at the top. Strangely enough, although appreciating the advantages of civilization as far as relates to good clothing and such food as they can buy at the stores, they manifest no de...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

zr- "yn JTfT'Ti?713r.Trv''''';-r."w'?,ir J57rT'TVTOr""l'fff.'0?'' ' Tin: Indian Advocavk. 102 "their condition in 1866. The description will apply equally well to-day, excepting that their numbers have diminished: This is a small tribe of about 500 Indians, livi lg in the extreme western part of the State. They are usually a harmless people, with much less physical and mental development than the Paintes. and more degraded mor ally. They are indolent, improvident, and much addicted to the vices and evil practices common in savage life. They manifest an almost uncontrolla ble appetite tor intoxicating drinks. They are sensual and filthy, and are annually diminishing in numbers from the diseases contracted through their indulgences. A few have learned the English language and will do light work for a reasonable compensation. They spend the winter months about the villages and habitations of white men, from whom they obtain tolerable supplies of food and clothing. The spring, summer an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

163 Thy: Indian Auvocatk. "WHITE ROSE OF MIAMI," In the Indian wars a white child named Slocum was cap tured by the Miami Indians, adopted by the tribe, and after wards married to a chief. She always refused every offer and inducement made by the whites to return to her home and people. Let me stay at my homo in -the beautiful west. Where I played when a child, in my age let me rest; Where the bright prairies bloom, and the wild waters play, In the home of my heart, dearest friends, let me stay. Oh, here let me stay, where my chief in the pride f Of a brave warrior youth, wandered forth by my side! Where he laid at my feet the young hunter's best prey, Where I roamed, a wild huntress--oh, friends, let me stay. Let me stay where the prairies I've oft wandered through. While my moccasins brushed from the flowers the dew Where my warrior would pluck the wild blossoms and say His "White Rose" was the fairest oh, here let me stay. Oh, here let me stay! where bright plumes from the wing O...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

'-.' Tm: In'dian Advocate. 164 A REFLECTION. The month ol May is past. It brought us many joys and many graces. The month of the Sacred Heart now offers us in turn its profusion of riches. The lilies of Mary, the palms of victory, the sparkling diadem of our Queen, the infinite tenderness of our Mother, the amaranthes of Calvary trans formed into the flowers of Paradise all these beautiful vis ions have sustained the soul during the month consecrated to Mary. Let us now turn to the sweet contemplation of her divine Son. Come, His Heart is open: He points toward it: He bids us enter. It is tor us that He has prepared this abode of love. He, the life' of the world, the Redeemer oi all, opens the treasure of His magnificence and bids us to come and abide in His Sacred Heart. True, at all times of the year we arc called upon to love and imitate our Divine Savior, to honor and imitate His Sacred Heart: but this duty becomes more pressing this month, when the particular least ol that Hear...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

165 L ii f Indian Advocati:. It is a time, when special graces lie in wait for our families, our benefactors and ourselves. Shall it be our fault, then, if some of those glowing gifts do not reach the outstretched hands of those dear souls whom we loved on earth, and joined with us as they were in these same exercises of devotion, and who left us with the hope and belief that through oui remem brance of their needs Paradise would soon become for them a blessed reality? Ah! no: we will not, we cannot forget them; for it is when our souls are best attuned to spiritual harmo nies, when they experience that holy sadness which is nearer akin to joy than pain, that our thoughts turn to them most fondly. Deep in tin mercy of the Sacred Heart. O let us place them, they who dwell apart. Whose lips, though still beseeching, are as dumb; Whose hands, uplifted always, vet are numb Whose pleading eyes are tearless, though they crave The one help which is theirs beyond the grave. Shall we forget ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

Tin: Indian Advocate. 166 SENTIMENT AND FAITH. J The Catholic Church puts sentiment in its right place; heresy puts it largely in the place of faith. It would be equally true to say that Catholics have a pure sentiment, while non Catholics have an unreal or a fictitious sentiment. It may be no fault of non-Catholics that they have not Catholic senti ment, for such a sentiment can be born only of Catholic faith; but though it be not their fault, it is their self loss a loss which they are naturally incompetent to apprehend. It may be interesting to trace what may be called the genesis of true sentiment, its origin, evolution and Christian place, since sen timent goes a long way in making our lives. Now we are not able to form any sort of conjecture as to what may have been the religious sentiment under the Theoc racy. We should only be able to speculate or think dreamily, were we to talk of sentiment "before the time of Dispensation. When we come to the days of Moses, to a Dispensati...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1901

wfwv&wffiiFWw 167 The Indian Advocate. the inspiration of a religious sentiment, not wholly unlike a Catholic's sentiment when in "St. Peter's." True, the senti ment was only anticipatory, was only expecting, was only born of the certain coming of the Divine Savior; yet because that certain coming was the Jewish faith, it gave a profound and tender character to Jewish sentiment. The Incarnation was the real parent of religious senti ment. God made Man; His Mother made our Mother; He Himself becoming our Mother in real sense; He Himself giv ing .Himself to us in holy communion; He Himself giving us absolution in the sacrament of penance, a holy cleansing by extreme unction at the hour of death, a saving Viaticum to take us securely from earth to heaven, and the positive reality of eternal union with His Soul and Godhead; here was indeed the fullness of religious sentiment, the satisfaction of every longing of the human heart. Just as the tabernacle on the Catholic altar is the ea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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