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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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OTTAWA, ILL, [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

OTTAWA, ILL, Jlugust 31st, 1846. Mr. Editor, —I hope you will do me the favor of inserting in your paper, the organ of the Irish, the following: Having resided for some time in the east, I removed to the far west, to seek that support which, through English tyranny and misrule, was denied me in my native land. I was overjoyed, on the route, via Albany to Buffalo, to behold so many stately Catholic Churches rearing to the skies their majestic spires, which admonish man of his destination, and crowned with the cross, the emblem of man’s redemption. Who were instrumental in raising these splendid edifices? The expatriated sons of persecuted Ireland, who freely and cheerfully appropriated a portion of their hard-earned wages to the erection of these magnificent temples for the worship of the Most High. The Irish resident in Illinois, possess in an eminent • degree the hereditary virtues of their illustrious ancestors; they are no degenerate sons of Milesius, and why should they? “Fortes...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

PR TCF. REDUCED. GRAND EXHIBITION Ob' WAX STATUARY. Comprising 140 Figures, executed l>y Mrs. VV. PELBY, now open at the lnte Swi:oE\noßOl.\N Chai-ei., Phillips Place, Tremont street, consisting of the following Groups, representing important and interesting subjects, the Size of Life: 1. Tiie Trial of Christ; 2. Abraham offering his Son Isaac ns a Sucriflce; 3. Christ, and the Woman taken in Sin; 4. A Picture of Selfishness in Contrast with Benevolence; 5. The Intemperate Family. 6. The Birth of Christ. And in Miniature, Cabinet Size: The Last Supper, The Trial of Christ, The Wonderful Draught of Fishes, The Savior on the Cross. Admittance 124 cents—without distinction of age. N.B. The Clergy and Editors of papers, are invited to attend free of charge. Open every day, from 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. On the Sabbath it will he opened in the Afternoon, immediately after Divine Service, till 10 o’clock. my3o fYytn MARBLE MANUFACTORY. The would beg leave to inform his friend* n-ill’ Y...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

MECHANICAL AND DENTAL SIIKJERI. TEETH AT COST, until Jan. I, 1847/ Office, No. 2uo Washington street, corner ol Avon Place, Boston. For the purpose of introducing more extensively in many impoitaut respects, an entire new mode of preparing and mounting Mineral Teeth on plate, the merits of which, it is confidently believed, will be found to greatly exceed the usuul method of preparing them, the subscriber has been induced to offer such terms, lor a limited time, as w ill not only give to the public generally an opportunity of testing the practical value of his theory, but w ill oner a rare opportunity for the poorer classes, whose means are too limited to pay the usual price demanded. The new principle is not only applicable to small cases of two or more teeth, but is peculiarly and especially adapted to whole and half sets, where the alveolar or dental ridge has become uneven and irregular, by the absorbing of some parts more than others. In all such casos, it will be readily seen ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

Notices of this kind inserted four times for SI. INFORMATION WANTED, Of JOHN BREGAN, a native of Connemara, co. Galway, who learned his trade in New York as a shoemaker, and left with his employer, .Mr. Gillespiein lb3B for Apalachicola, Florida. Any information of him will be thankfully received by bis brothers, Peter and Bernard Hragari, I£3 North Main st, Providence, R.l. aug££ Of JOHN CALLAGHAN, of Bishopstown, co. Cork, who emigrated to this country in May, 1844, and when last heard from, (about l£ mouths ago), was in Fort Monroe, Old Point Comfort, state of Virginia. Any iuibrmatiou given will be thankfully received by his brother, Dennis. Address to John Hughes, William street, Lowell, Ms. aug££—4t 11 Of JOHN DUNN, a native of Queen’s County, who left Montpelier, Vt, on the Bth of July last. Dunn is between 40 and 4j years of age. Any person know ing anything of him will please write to liis disconsolate wife Catherine, care of Daniel Corry, Montpelier, Vt. Peter Dunn, hisson...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SMITH O'BRIEN IN KILRUSH. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

SMITH O'BRIEN IN KILRUSH. We promised in our Inst to give the speech of this distinguished gentleman. We have much pleasure in laying it before our readers The Chairman gave—- “ The health of Mr. O’Brien” (tremendous applause, which lasted for several minutes, all the company standing and wavin"their handkerchiefs). Mr. O’Brien rose, and the shouts of pleasure from the entire company were repeated again and again till the room rang with the echo. Silence being at length obtained, the honourable gentleman said —Mr Chairman, Messrs Vice-Presidents, and Gentleman, to be received in any assembly of Irishmen, as I have been received to-day in Kilrush, and this evening at the banquet, could uot fail to gratify one even more ravenous of praise than I am; but to be received as 1 am to-day by the men of Clare, by the men of a county which 1 claim as my own (cheers), of which it is my proudest boast that I am one ofthe aborgines(rene\ved cheers), to be received on the soil which has been inha...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LETTER FROM IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

LETTER FROM IRELAND. Our readers are already aware that William Schouler, Esq., editor of the Lowell Journal has been travelling in Ireland. From his letter of June, we copy the following extracts. He writes from Dublin:— I will now tell you of what I saw in Dublin. The Irish people are proud of their metropolis. If you are travelling in any other part of Ireland and speak of the beauty of any place where you have been, be it Cork, Kilkenny, Belfast, or any other important place, the answer will ininvariably be, “ Oh, yes, those are very fine places, to be sure, but then, sir, they are nothing to Dublin;” or, “Wait till you have seen Dublin, and you’ll have reason to think you haveseen a fine place.” I The attachment to Dublin is stronger than ' any mere local attachment, for I have heard men, borrt in Cork and in Kilkenny, and in Belfast, speak of their respective places disparingly in order to extol more effectually the importance and magnificence of Dublin. Dublin now numbers abo...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
O’CONNELL AND YOUNG IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

O’CONNELL AND YOUNG IRELAND. THE PILOT. SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 184 G. The facility with which a row can be created in an Irish crowd is proverbial ; and the cordiality with which the people of that country will fight without knowing why, is not more notorious than it is discreditable. It seems as if they are about to carry this propensity into political agitation. YVe thought it had been a distinction of the lower orders, the brutal taste of an ignorant and neglected people, exhibited in fairs and patrons, in the streets and market places; but it seems to be extending itself to the leaders of the nation; scholars and orators in public meetings and in public prints have caught the spirit, and commenced to fight about they know not what. Two newspapers in Dublin have become jealous of each other; and all Irelaud is to be set together by the ears for that. If such things go on, the national party will become at once the sport and the tool of Ireland’s foes; like an undisciplined army, it...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PROJECTED MASSACRE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

PROJECTED MASSACRE. "W lien the train which conveyed the remains of Bishop Fenwick to Worcester, was returning upon that narrow causeway which leads through the Mill-dam between Roxbury and Boston, on the evening of the 13th, a large bar of iron was found to have been placed across the rails. Providentially, one end of the bar was thrown up by the opposite wheel; and no more damage was done than to break through the bottom of one of the cars, and slightly injure a young woman’s foot. The bar must have been deliberately put there,under the shades of night, to intercept that particular train; for another train had passed in, over the same rails, only half an hour before, after which the obstruction was laid down. The obvious purpose was to throw the engine off the rails, when it would have run immediately into the water, dragging with it all the cars, which would have sunk to the bottom with five or six hundred people within them. The thought reminds us of that tyrant who wished all t...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
OUR LAMENTED BISHOP. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

OUR LAMENTED BISHOP. That our readers at a distance may see the high estimation in which Bishop Fenwick was held in this city, we select the following extracts from notices of his death, published in the city papers:— During this long period ofsuffering he displayed uniform patience and Christum resignation, and exhibited, even in greater perfection, those benign and amiable traits ol character which had secured for him the devoted attachment and veneration of all who came within the influence of his official ministration, or had occasion to hold personal intercourse with him. He was a profound theologian, a learned civilian, a powerful preacher, a thoroughly read historian, a sagacious and prudent counsellor iu all that related to the interests of his church, and what lie deemed for the welfare of his people. His talents for administration were of the highest order; and the progress of his church ill this section of the country may be given as evidence of it. When he received his a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE ABSTRACTION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

THE ABSTRACTION. An abstract question has come up for discussion among the Repealers. We used to think that the agitation was grounded on such plain matters of fact and unde niable principles, that there was no occasion to stop for one moment asking questions, —nothing to do hut go forward fearlessly. It seems, now, we must brush up our logic, and begin to arguefy about abstract and concrete war: we must examine ourselves, and search the scriptures, to find out whether we are Quakers or other Christians upon that point. Our opinion is that to excite a people to war by constitutional agitation absurd, or something worse. If war is necessary, and circumstances render it advisable, it is the most obvious means of redress; it is comprehensible to the grossest capacity; and very little argument and eloquence is necessary to persuade a nation to adopt it. In fact, war is one of the least intellectual things in the world; and, whatever the gentlemen called Young Ireland may think of their ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SECESSION OF SMITH O'BIEN. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

SECESSION OF SMITH O'BIEN. Since our articles of this week were written, we learn, by the arrival of the Caledonia, that the dissensions, to which we have alluded, have ended by Smith O’Brien and his supporters leaving Conciliation Hall. An injudicious article had appeared in the Nation, intimating that, “in the fiery enthusiasm of ’43,” war and revolution were contemplated by some of the lenders of the Association, and that the language of O’Connell justified those views. 01 course, such statements were calculated to discredit O’Connell, and all who act with him, to justify the state prosecutions, and to altogether undermine that moral power on which Ireland puts her dependence. Accordingly, O’Connell wrote home from London, and required the Association to repudiate those statements. A discussion ensued in Conciliation Hall in which the chief speakers were Messrs Smith O’Brien, John O’Connell, Mitchell, and Meagher. It continued for two days; it was all about the abstraction; and a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DISTINGUISHED CONVERTS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

DISTINGUISHED CONVERTS. From our Correspondent. Burlington, Vl, August 11, 1846. My Dear Donahoe, — You must be highly gratified, and so will he your readers, to hear that the Uev. William hi. Hoit, Episcopal pastor of a numerous and respectable congregation in St. Albans, has a few days ago, together with his amiable lady and four children, abjured the Protestant and embraced our Holy ltoman Catholic Church. He had several months before resigned his clerical benefice and ceased to officiate in the Anglical Schism. Having by extensive reading, or rather from the light of the Spirit of Truth detected the emptiness of Protestancy, he could not any longer remain outside; he has chosen the better part which will not be taken away from him. We have much pleasure in adding the name of the new convert to our list. His subscription has been forwarded to us by our venerable and reverend friend, Jeremiah O’Callaghan. The Hibernia left this port Sunday afternoon for Liverpool, with 41 passenge...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Arrival of the Caledonia. TEN DAYS LATER NEWS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

Arrival of the Caledonia. TEN DAYS LATER NEWS. The Steamship Caledonia, Capt. E. G. Lott, from Liverpool 4th inst, was telegraphed at i before 11 Tuesday morning, making the passage in 134 days, and bringing ten days later intelligence from all parts of Europe. The Caledonia brought 105 passengers from Liverpool to Halifax, left 21 there and took in 23 additional for Boston. Total 128. Prince Albert had paid a visit to Liverpool to lay the foundation of the Sailor’s Home, and to open the new dock which is to hear his name. His reception was grand and imposing. A good business has been done in Cotton, but prices have not advanced. The Wheat Crop in the Western Districts has been cut, but it is said to have been less heavy than was anticipated. The crops in various quarters have been beaten down and injured by storms. There has not been much briskness in the manufacturing districts. Owing to the tariff having passed the more popular branch of Congress, the value of Iron has risen in a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 7 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 7 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

Business pq»< THE BOSTON ] IS PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY T PATRICK DONA On every Saturday morning, at No 1 Washington Street, Dostoi TERMS... .§2.so—if paid within the time of subscribing—otherwise $1 51.50 for six mouths. Four in on O* Letters not post-paid (except fr released from the Post-olllce. Hartford, Ct. We have made art Rose, No. 2 American Hotel Row, to Pilot. The paper will be sold on the i after the first week in September. Eastport, Me. Mr. James McDav this place and vicinity. He is addin east.” Go-a-liead. “J. C., Jr.” We are thankful tc sent, and should have published them had a summary of the articles ahead; Nesyuehoning, Pa. J.P. is inforr year on the Ist of July, 1846. He can t from our agent in Philadelphia, Mr. T “ Af.” We are glad our young frier “ Sick Calls.” We should publish ar tion occasionally, but it is difficult to ] We shall, however, endeavor to prof correspondent. RECEIPTS. Massachusetts—Clappville, M. Gli G. Gibson 1; C. Christmass, P. R. J...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 7 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

To the Editor of the Post: Oh ! do tell us who writes the "delectable daily ?” YV tiful, pretty, quite pleasant, in Saturday’s Post, callet teer’s Last Gift to his Son life of us we couldn’t reco seen it before —except in th the Colonel ever get well? MARKET! Boston Market— Aug 19. Flour andria $4.00 4.19; Baltimore, com. ard st, 4.12; Fredericksburg 4 fa) 4.oii; ( 4.25; do. fancy brands 4.50 IS) 4.b7; Gee do. extra 4.25 (S) 4.50; Michigan 4 (3) 4. Philadelphia 3.67 fa) 4.00; Rye Flour, i Brighton Market— Monday, Au> Beef Cattle, 450 Store Cattle, 8 yol 32 Cows and Calves, 2000 Sheep and 300 Swine. 112 lieud of the cattle can Kuilroad. Prices. Beef Cattle—First Quality s.2s—third quality 4 fa) 4.50 Stores—Last week’s prices barely st Working Oxen—Sales were made a Cows and Calves—Sales were mad (a) 42.50 Sheep and Lambs—Sales of lots al 2.87 Swine—Sales were not noticed, t buyers at marke . DIED. In South Boston, on the 14th inst, Nluent, a native of County Long! resident...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

R| OCHE, BROTHERS A MFJfTS FOR 1840 Rem sage to Great Britain and J Ball, or Old Lint of Liverpool Packet York and Liverpool on the lst and 1 And by First Class American Ships, Persons sending to tlie “Old Coum can make the necessary arrangement mid have them brought out in any of prising the Black Ball, or Old Lute < (sailing from Liverpool on the Ist ant also by First Class Ships, sailing f which our Agents, Messrs. J ami there will see are sent out without and Should those sent for not come out funded without uny deduction. The Black Ball, or Old Line of Idv rrise the following magnificent ship •iverpol on their regulur appointed < The FIDELIA, on Ist Jan. EUROPE, Kith “ NEW YORK, Ist Feb. AMERICAN, loth “ YORKSHIRE, Ist Mar. CAMBRIDGE, lbtlt “ OXFORD, Ist April. MONTEZUMA, loth “ Notice. It is well known that t the very best conveyance for perm friends, and as other Passenger Asm out passengers by that Line, the Pub! tided by order of the OWNERS thal but RO...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 22 August 1846

JOHN HERDMAN A: CO. United Slates and Great Britan GRAFT PASSAGE OFFICE, No New York. IIERDMAN, KEENA> Aud by their Boston Agent, MR. MIC lit the Catholic Bookstore, Federal s old stand. Passage to and from Great Britain a erpool and London, by the regular mu the Ist, tith, 11th, lotli, 21st, and Aith c from l.iverpoo, and to aud from Lon and 20th of each month. The Liveri comprised of the following superior st SHIPS. CAPTAINS. TONS. SHIPS Independence, Allen, 750 Henry C Waterloo, Allen, 1000 Fidelia, Hottinguer, Bursley, 993 Roscius, Europe, Furber, tiilo Ashburt JohnH.Skiddy,Skiddy, 060 New Y< Siddons, Cobb, 89a Liverpo Shenandoah, West, 800 Yorksh Sheridan, Conisn, 895 Cambri Patrick HenJy, Dclauo, 891 Viritlnii Rochester, Britton, 715 Oxford, Garrick, Trask, 895 Montczi Stephen Whitney, Thomason, 88C Uueen of the West, Wooohouse, llti3 The Commercial Line is comprised which will be despatched from Liver year, in regular succession: SHIPS. CAPTAINS. SHIP Se...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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