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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SHEEP RAISING IN CALIFORNIA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

SHEEP RAISING IN CALIFORNIA. Wool growing has already become one of the leading interests in California. The increase of sheep in this State for the past few years has no parallel either in the history of this business in the older States, or in any other portion of the world. The raising of sheep for wool here "was first undertaken in 185.'?; and two years later, in 1866, there were shipped from this city 350,000 pounds of wool. This amount was doubled the year following, and in 1857, had increased to 1,100,000 pounds. From that time to the present the increase has been steady, until the annual aggregate has reached 20,000,000 pounds or 10,000 tons, sufficient to load 10 first-class ships, if it was all sent away. Ten thousand tons of wool from a State whose agricultural population docs not exceed 860,000, and with n< t a twentieth part of its arable land improved is a most satisfactory showing. If anything like this rate of increase is Continued for ten years longer, ou...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE WOOL SEASON. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

THE WOOL SEASON. The wool crop of the State promises a large increase over that of last season. The flock masters in tho San Joaquin valley, are busily engaged in taking off the spring clips from their large flocks. The Tulare Times says the effect of the organization of the Wool Growers' Association in that county will be to promote the advancement of the sheep raising interest, and the introduction of the highest grades of woolbearing animals. A friendly contest is going on between J. A. Patterson and 13. P. Pennebaker, two well-known and large sheep raisers of that county, as to tho wool-producing qualities of their respective flocks. Each shear 400 ewes, and those yielding the greatest number of pounds will carry off the prize. The Delia of the 22d ult. gives a certificate signed by ,T. St. Clarie, Alex. Z. Scott, Wm. A. Carothers and M. Flieschman, certifying to the fact that they assisted in shearing, sacking and weighing the wool from 400 of J. A. Patterson's ewes, which aggr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SHEEP HUSBANDRY A NECESSITY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

SHEEP HUSBANDRY A NECESSITY. Sheep-husbandry is a necessity. There il no substitute for the animal with the "golden hoofs" —none which can so cheaply supply the elementary wants of a dense population. France has as many sheep as souls, in the Empire. England could almost as safely part with the air breathed by onefourth of her people, as with her sheep — the meat, wool, hides and manure they yield; and while we are glad to see large flocks transferred to and established on the plains of Kansas, Nebraska, and other sparsely populated States and Territories of the West, the older States, where lands have lost their virgin freshness and fertility, can ill afford to submit to further reduction. The great bulk of the best wool grown in the world is grown by small flocks, in the midst of the most densely peopled regions. It is so now in the United States, and so will it continue to be. On the whole, therefore, we look in the future of the woolen industry hopefully, and witli abiding confi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

Road Steamers for City Locomotion —In a paper read before the New York Society of Practical Engineering, in March, ,T. K. Fisher propose! to use itoam carriages instead of locomotives, for city travel. After remarking that at H l/ t miles per hour they are safer than horses at <» miles, he says: — "But if undergrade streets, floored with cast-iron, be made, steam carriages can run in them at -40 miles an hour. They will run whole journeys without Stopping, passing way carriages; but the railway trains stop at every station. The cost of each stop is half a cent per ton. Steam carriages, weighing 'i tons, and ■topping seldom, will work at less cost on such lines. And when a carriage gets to the end of the iron street, it can run over common roads to the houses of passengers. For the up-town and suburban traffic, they can give an average speed of 25 miles per hour -more than double the speed attainable by the proposed imitations of the Metropolitan system. And they will pick...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POULTRY NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

POULTRY NOTES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOW TO RAISE TURKEYS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

HOW TO RAISE TURKEYS. A correspondent of the Country Gentleman treat* the subject of "how to raise turkeys" and gives his experience in that line. He is farmer for Hon. John Wontworth, Chicago, 111. He s;iys: "Mr. Wentworth sent to the West and got me wild turkeys from three different places. None of them were at, all domesticated. We made two large enclosures, and winged the wild ones, confining the wild males with the tame females, and wild females with the tame males. The experiment was a success, nearly every ogg hatched, and scarce a turkey died. In the fall we turned out the wild ones with the main flock, and not one went away. They were not separated afterwards, and last season they were left to their own course. The most of them stole their nests, and many would hide their young. But in due time they all came home, and two years' experience has demonstrated to ns that the best way to raise turkeys is to give them the wild cross and let them alone. "While we have no difficult...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PROFITABLE FOWLS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

PROFITABLE FOWLS. We find the following in the Stockton Independent of the :M hurt: We noticed yesterday, at the residence of John Sedgwick, live light Brahma pullets and one rooster, all of enormous size, considering the fact that they an- only nine month! old. The rooster weighs eleven pounds, and the pallets average eight pounds each. It is said that Brahma chickens grow until they are eighteen months old. From hve pallets, 148 eggs were obtained during the months of January and February; 114 in March; five eggs on the Ist inst, and three before 10 o'clock yesterday morning. An accurate account is kept of the number of eggs gathered daily, and the date on which they are found in the nest is marked with a pencil on the shell of each. The original price of the brood was §90, and the sum of £."><) has already been realized from the sale of eggs alone, and quite a number of chickens produced likewise. Mr. Sodgwick appears to take as much pride in his Brahma fowl...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
NEW VARIETY OF FOWL—ROYAL JAVA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

NEW VARIETY OF FOWL—ROYAL JAVA. This brood of fowl comos from the island of Java, and resembles the Brfbmai vorv niut'h in appearance, and is about the same size, but black in color. Tho cock will weigh, when full grown, from eight to ton pounds and tho lion from seven to ton. They are an excellent table fowl and good layers, quiet and easily roared. They are all feather-legged, and stand low on their legs. Tho inside of the foot is yellow, and their flesh is very yellow. They are as tough and hard as the Brahma, and the chickens can be reared without any trouble and are in every respect equal to the Brahma, and in some respects more desirable, as they are not inclined to set as often and are easily broken up when they are inclined to. They are a very showy fowl, as their plumage is a tine, beautiful greenish black; and are more active, than the Brahmas in their movements, and do not break down so early. In tho cock will often be found a shading of red in the hackle feathers, and in...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE SWINE YARD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

THE SWINE YARD. How to Raise Laboh Porkbbs.—To pro* dnoe Urge hogsthey must be fed from birth as much as they will oat. It will not do to let them shirk for themselves in the summer, and then expect t<> make large ho<*s of them, us "fat us butter," by feeding them a few weeks in the fall. A writer on hogs, says,: "The finest porkers T ever saw were kept growing right along through every day of their lives till slaughtered. More is commonly lost in winter than at any other time. See that they have a dry, warm, sheltered place, plenty of good clean Litter to keep them warm, a'very regular supply of wholesome food, (not trash) and a clean place to stay in. With this kind of management, suoh pigs as you would have next spring, would astonish your slip-shod, ('areless neighbors at your "wonderful luck;" and if corresponding care were continued through the season, you could show such porkers as would surprise them still more. Vakikty or Food fob Hoos. All ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PORK RAISING IN LOS ANGELES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

PORK RAISING IN LOS ANGELES. The News recently commented npon tlie astonishing fatuity <>£ those, farmers who, with lands that produce one hundred bushels and upwards of corn per acre, sell that product at seventy-live cents per cental, when honie-inade bacon finds ready sale at from fifteen to twenty-five cents per pound. Widnet/*» Real Estate Advertiser has the following remarks on this topic, which arc worthy of consideration by onr fanners: Experiments during the last five years, show that this climate is peculiarly well adapted to curing pork, and that the hams and bacon are superior to any other in the market. Owing to the large quantity of corn raised and to the fact that the climato is so well adapted to cure the meat, this will be the pork metropolis of the Paoiflo coast. Corn-fed bacon cannot be produced in any other place <>n the coast; this leaves us without competition as to the quality of the article. Los Angeles hams hrin^ s...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. Suffocating Squirrels.— Many devices are resorted to to get rid of these troubleBorne pests. Wo have already in previous numbers given several ways of heading them off, and a correspondent in to-day's issue gives his method of preparing a deadly dose of phosphorus for them; and now here comes Dr. Carothers, of Santa Clara, through the columns of the San Jose Mercury, with still another method for " suffocating" them, which may be substantially described as follows: A liberal sprinkling of dry sulphur is spread upon a piece of cud bagging of suitable size for a charge, and us much coal oil poured carefully over it as the sulphur and cloth will fairly hold without dripping. The doth is then lighted at the mouth of a squirrel hole and thrust in with an iron rod as far as may be practicable, the combustion boing maintained, and the smoke and fumes driven downward, by the draft from the mouth of the hole. After sufficient time allowed for combustion of the...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to Destroy Gophers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

How to Destroy Gophers. Ed. Peess:—Having read of many methods for the destruction of that little depredating rodent —tho gopher, none of ■which on trial, havo proved eilioacious, —I have at length, after much experimenting, hit upon a prescription which I think, if adopted generally, will go far towards eradicating these abominable pests. Place over a slow tire a vessel containing ■water; -within this vessel place a can containing one pint of syrup. When the syrup is heated to about 90*, drop in a piece of phosphorus about an inch in length and stir slowly with a wooden stick, the phosphorous will dissolve in about one minute. Now stir in common white flour until the whole is of the consistency of good thick paste; let it cool and it is ready for use. Take potatoes, (carrots, beets, onions, etc., may answer, but nine have had the best success with potatoes); slice them up, handling as little as possible, and smear on, with a wooden or metallic knife, some of the compound. Go around...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Uncle Sam's Farm. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

Uncle Sam's Farm. In spite of the immense grants to railroads, the United States is still the greatest land owner in the -world, and is literally rich enough to give us all a farm. East of the Mississippi there are still about 60,000,---000 acres of public lands not yet disposed of, chiefly in lowa, "Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan, and west of that river—not including our Alaskan purchase— are 993,742,562 acres, distributed as follows: lowa, Missouri and Arkansas 16,000,000 Dakota and Wyoming 145,295,284 Montana 80,904,0.03 Kansas 43,148,876 Nebraska 52,523,027 Colorado and Idaho 117,800,000 New Mexico and Utah 124,140,000 Nevada and Arizona 136,000,000 Minnesota 36,776,170 California, Oregon and Washington 201,000,000 Indian Territory 44,154,000 This would give a nice little farm of over twenty-five acres to every man, woman and child in the country.— B. F. Call. Mixed Husbandry.—A statement at the Farmer's Club, Rochester, N. V., by Mr. Wheeler, a revenue assessor, is to the e...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Hose-Sprinkler. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

Hose-Sprinkler. The accompanying illustration shows an exceedingly neat and useful apparatus, which is used as a sprinkler for vegetation and wherever a spray is beneficial or useful. The device is the invention of an engineer of this city and is manifestly a great improvement on the sprinklers which are commonly used. Tho drawing shows the sprinkler in operation, and also the essential part of the devico which is represented as lying on the walk in the foreground. The apparatus consists of three or more hollow curved arms, attached to a central cylinder which involves upon the upper ciul of a vortical pipe to which the hose is attached. Holes are made at intervals through the vertical pipe iv the track of tho openings in the curved arms. These allow the water to bo forced out through tho arms when the holes in these arms are opposite the holes in the vertical pipe, but cut off the supply at other times. The reaction of the water escaping from the ends of the arms, causes these to r...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Ferret and its Usefulness. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

The Ferret and its Usefulness. EDITOBB Pkess:—l l>eg to offer you a few lines with regard to tlio ferret, which is a most useful little animal, both for town and country. It is the natural foo of the rat and rabbit tribe, and as such must be a friend to every fanner, besides which it offers every one an hour's amusement whenever they want it, or rather, I ought to say, an hour's exercise and excitement. Squirrels and gophers aro poisoned and caught by means of traps, but these are slow, expensive and dangerous methods; the money expended in a dozen traps would purchase a ferret, and would catch live times as many animals in a less spaoe of time. Poison is dangerous to other animals, as well as expensive. A ferret put into a gopher or squirrel hole would master its inmate in a minute or two. For ferocious courage they are not oven excelled by the thoroughbred bull-dog, which, with their great activity, gives them an advantage over much larger animals than themselves. Put a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Agricultural Operations in Montana. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

Agricultural Operations in Montana. EniToits Pbmb: — W« have not got fairly about our spring's work here yet, though it is well under way in Home of our valleys. As for that matter, however, we might hare been doing "spring's work" all winter, for the weather has been mild and delightful, and our roads dry and dusty. Indeed, strange as it may seem, the lack of snow is our great drawback here in tho Rooky Mountains. We have not had two inches of snow on the ground at any time in our valleys and foothills this winter, though it is said that there is enough in the mountains to make a more prosperous mining season than we have had for somo years, and our farmers are preparing for an increased demand for agricultural produce, ' that a successful mining season will de- ' velop, by cultivating an increased area of land. In fact our people have been steadily paying more and more attention to agricultural pursuits, as their preconceived opinions in regard to climatic difficulties, etc., have...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Grape Growing, etc., in the Mountains. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

Grape Growing, etc., in the Mountains. Editors Press:—Grrfpe grafting lias become general in El Dorado county. The "V" knife spoken of some time ago in a communication to the Press, by Mr. Briggs of Alameda county, is not in favor here; although the inventor is a resident of this place. The manner of grafting the vine is to dig the earth from around the roots to the depth of about four inches, saw off the vine, then split or saw the stump to the depth^of about/>ne inch, and with a sharp, thin-bladed knife, smooth each side next to the bark, and fit the scion which should have about throe buds; after which the ea.ith should be closely packed around the stump and graft, leaving one bud just at tho top of the ground. lam told that from ninety-five to ninety-seven per cent, of vines treated in this manner grow and in most cases bear a small crop the same year. Mr. W. ]3. Othick, of Coloma, informed me that he has taken 15 lbs. of flame colored tokay, from a graft of that kind...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Wood Preserving. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

Wood Preserving. There was laid on our desk, last week, a thin piece of wood, on which was pasted tho following information:— This piece of Stow Foundation Pavement Avas preserved by the Pacific Wood Preserving Company, and laid in New Montgomery street, in the city of San Francisco, during July, 18(59. It Avas taken up March, 1871, and was cut from one of a hundred blocks laid in a body, to show the durability of the Stow pavement preserved by the Robins' process. All the blocks of preserved wood were found to be sound. The blocks are worn not to exceed one-eighth of an inch by the twenty months' service, which would give a durability of not less than twenty years, without repairs. Works for preserving wood are on Berry street, near Fourth, San Francisco. The wood is certainly in an excellent state of preservation and but slightly worn on the upper surface. The Robins' process, alluded to above, consists in placing the wood in air-tight chambers, connected by a goose-neck with a la...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 15 April 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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