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Title: Annotations Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,297 items from Annotations, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 April 1991

APRIL 1991 ANNOTATIONS PAGE 9 - mm Judge Brown has affected though he never took the By Bain Pearson His influence in the legal community has been widespread. Some of his opinions reshaped the South. He is so well respected that he has been asked to teach at law schools in the United States and in Europe. And he has such a command of his field that some people read his opinions solely because he wrote them. All this describes Judge John R. Brown, a man who never took the LSAT or a bar exam. Judge Brown was born in Nebraska on December 10, 1909. He received an AB from The University of Nebraska in 1930 and a JD from The University of Michigan in 1932. He has received honorary doctorates of law from his alma maters and Tulane University. Brown made straight A's throughout law school, and was a very active member of the Law Review. Even though this exemplary work gave him a true commitment to the law, it didn't ease his efforts to find a job as a lawyer. "In those days, all you really ...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 April 1991

PAGE 10 ANNOTATIONS APRIL 1991 I The Sixth Annual Law Week April 4 - 10 The Bill of Rights Thursday, April 4 Peter Riga The Clergy-Penitent Privilege - 5:30 Sponsored by The Christian Legal Society Friday, April 5 Judge Morris Overstreet Texas Court of Criminal Appeals - 5:30 Sponsored by The Black Law Students Association Monday, April 8 Nancy Bunin Houston Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union - 12:30 Sponsored by The Law Week 1991 Steering Committee Felix Sanchez The Houston Post - 4:30 Sponsored by Annotations and The Environmental Law Society Dr. Harold Hyman William P. Hobby Chair of History, Rice University - 5:30 Sponsored by The Law Week 1991 Steering Committee Tuesday, April 9 George Willy - 12:30 Sponsored by The Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association Judge Lupe Salinas The Hispanic Right to an Interpreter in Criminal Proceedings and Professor Sandra Guerra The University of Houston Discriminatory Effects of the "Drug Courier Profile" - 5:30 Sponsored by ...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 April 1991

APRIL 1991 ANNOTATIONS PAGE 11 Brown's influence has been widespread admiralty law much, but I turn to his admiralty opinions for the sheer pleasure of reading Brown." Though he never took an admiralty class, he is a Proctor in the American Maritime Law Association. This title is given to a lawyer who has practiced maritime law for a certain amount of time. Brown has been an Honorary Proctor since 1937.As well known as Brown is for his knowledge of admiralty, he is also seen in another perspective. W.J. Williamson, former dean of South Texas, believes that Brown is a "conservative with a vision," that Brown "truly has the interest of the community at heart, and that he is a man of the people." This is seen in the civil rights decisions he made while a member of the Fifth Circuit. Judge Brown was a member of the panel whose monumental decisions regarding desegregation had a pivotal effect in the South. These decisions affected the voting rights and educational and job opportunities o...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 April 1991

PAGE 12 ANNOTATIONS APRIL 1991 BAR REVIEW 1415 Fannin Houston, Texas 77002 (713) 739-9482 1-800-392-5441 (in Texas) Nancy Lusk Head Representative 558-7802 License to Practice The Supreme Court of the State of Texas acknowledges J. Q. Law Student Having met the requirements of the law and having been accepted by the State Board of Law Examiners is hereby entitled to be licensed as an attorney and counselor at law Other representatives from STCL: Michelle Williams 692-7335 Rachel Tindel 659-5489 Bill Sebesta 465-2766 Bruce Kaye 497-5868 Carl Hennagir 488-4115 Shaun Devine 444-5477 Leonid Ellis 880-5234 Kanchan Bhalerao 463-2838 Melanie McGahee 699-8773

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

Annotations VOL. XIX NO. IX MAY 1991 South Texas may gain AALS accreditation By Steve Petrou South Texas could be approved for American Association of Law Schools membership by January of 1992, said the chair of the AALS team that scrutinized South Texas in April. Professor Richard Huber of the Boston College School of Law, chairman of the inspection team, said the group will file a report with AALS by mid- August. If the report is positive, South Texas likely will garner the accreditation, he said. Dean Bill Wilks said he believes that South Texas is well on its way of achieving a long-time goal of membership in the organization. "I thought it went very well, they were pleased and surprised to see what we had here," said Wilks after the three-day visit last month by a team of AALS inspectors. The inspectors met with students and visited classes to get a first-hand look at the quality of instruction. Huber said 154 law schools are members of the AALS, compared to the 175 that are ac...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

PAGE 2 cjclijCTIILW DICTA By Raymond Daniel Annotations Editor For the past year and a half, I have had the honor and pleasure of serving as editor of Annotations. During that time I have tried to address some concerns of South Texas in this column. Not all of those concerns have been resolved during that time, so they deserve a second mention as I bid farewell. This column started in November 1989 with my criticisms of our method of taking attendance. As time has passed, I find myself even more critical. This method may work well in some classes, but it is an absolute disaster in others. There are some classes in which students come in with just a few minutes left in class, yet they actually sign the roll. In other classes, a student who is one minute late can be counted as absent. Since these scenarios present one example of how a student can miss nearly the whole class and be counted as present, while another student can be there nearly the entire class and be counted absent, I h...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

may 1991 CICLO fflULÍW PAGE 3 Law Week 1991 Nation faces critical point in constitutional history, civil rights lawyer says "We are at a critical point in our constitutional history. Do we let the Constitution lead us where it may and remain true to the spirit of the Constitution, or do we begin to retreat and return to a form of society that we have somehow conceived to be the best model?" posed South Texas graduate George Willy during Law Week. Willy spoke of a "reversal of fortune" in relation to damaging blows dealt by the Supreme Court recently to the 1970s' achievements of the Warren Court. A private practitioner specializing in civil rights employment cases, Willy addressed South Texas students at the request of the Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association. The framers envisioned a society in evolution, he explained, letting every individual obtain his or her full potential free from the dictates and unnecessary intrusions from the government - which, he urged, include...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

PAGE 4 ANNOTATIONS MAY1W1 W Law Week 1991 Privacy litigation will be abundant, Overstreet tells Law Week audience In a society in which the reasonable expectation of privacy is rapidly changing, said a judge from the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, there will be plenty of privacy litigation in the future. Rules in some areas of the law are not set in concrete, said Judge Morris Overstreet during his April 5 Law Week speech, so practitioners don't have "hard and fast" rules to follow. This occurs, he said, because the make-up of the courts change and the ideas of privacy that the judges have are not the same as those of the founding fathers. Because state supreme courts and the United States Supreme Court interpret rights differently, this also adds to the confusion of privacy rights. "It's not unusual for the states to provide greater protection than the federal government allows," said Overstreet. This can occur in criminal law in the areas of search and seizure, the exclusionary ...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

■í- MAY 1991 PAGE 5 Law Week 1991 Professor, judge address erosion of civil rights By Karen Ball The domestic war on drugs is having a chilling effect on minorities, said a University of Houston Law School professor and a state district judge during Law Week. Sandra Guerra, a University of Houston law professor, said that the Drug Enforcement Agency's use of "drug courier profiles" has had a particularly harsh impact on minorities. Guerra conceded the use of the drug courier profile has slowed the pace of drug trafficking. But, she added, the DEA's use of the profile oftentimes tramples on the civil liberties of minorities. The drug courier profiles are compiled by DEA agents and contain characteristics common to drug smugglers. Guerra and State District Judge Lupe Salinas spoke at South Texas during Law Week. Their visit was sponsored by the Hispanic Law Students Association and the Women's Legal Forum. "By vesting unchecked authority in the police to identify people who look like ...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

PAGE i. fATIONS MAY1W1 Law Week 1991 protection By sieve Petrou Journalist refuses to reveal sources A reporter who spent three days locked inside a judge's chambers told South Texas students that in his opinion, the Constitution protects journalists from having to reveal sources. Felix Sanchez, police reporter for The Houston Post, refused to disclose the names of witnesses that he interviewed following a double murder last May. Sanchez, here at the invitation of Annotations and the Environmental Law Society for Law Week, said that five teenagers that he talked to about the murders agreed to be interviewed by him and reporter James Campbell of The Houston Chronicle, only on the condition that their names not be disclosed. Sanchez said he never knew the names of the witnesses that he talked to, but defense lawyers subpoenaed him and asked him to disclose the names of the witnesses during the murder trial of the two suspects. Sanchez said he and Campbell refused to answer the questio...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

MAY 1991 ATIONS PAGE 7 Law Week 1991 Weddington utilized privacy argument in pivotal Roe case (Continued from Page 1) probably would have said, 'working in a small Texas town practicing law.'" The daughter of a Methodist minister who necessarily moved every four years, Weddington grew up in several such small Texas towns. Highlighting South Texas' Sixth Annual Law Week, Weddington began "A Day With Sarah Weddington" with a faculty breakfast and an informal talk with a group of about 100 students later that morning. She also judged the finals of the Spurgeon Bell Moot Court Competition. "She wasn't at all like I thought she would be," said Khanchan Bhalerao, a second-year student who attended the late- morning talk. "I thought she would be very hard- driving, but she was very warm and funny ~ she seems like a wonderful human being." Weddington playfully told of the very serious reputation she had as a Texas legislator, and about an interviewer asking her legislative aide, Ann Richard...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

PAGE 8 ANNOTATIONS MAY 1991 School heightens security measures (Continued from Page 1) Mall, said Dugger, because there aren't signs of crime there like there are downtown. But if more people use the downtown area for the purposes for which they should, the crime rate will drop. Though Dugger encouraged the use of downtown, he cautioned people about their behavior. Don't let yourself become a victim of crime, he said, by leaving personal property in plain sight in your car. Auto theft is the No. 1 crime downtown, he said, so people should be careful not to leave their doors unlocked or their windows rolled down. Dugger said that people often tell him that crime would decline in their neighborhoods if only there were "a couple of more policemen assigned out here." Dugger doesn't buy this theory. "Visibility doesn't count," he said. "It's what you do with that visibility." John Moore, the divisional regional manager for ABM Security, the company with which South Texas has a security c...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

MAY 1991 ANNOTATIONS PAGE 9 Law Review honors members at banquet Students tour Court of Criminal Appeals South Texas Law Review recently hosted its annual awards banquet at the Houston City Club where it presented Distinguished Service and Writing Awards to Review members. Distinguished service awards went to Reesa Hedrick, the Dean's Award; Drew Coats, the Judge John R. Brown Award; Scott Scherr, the Mrs. Addie Lucille Heaton Award; Scott Cordes, the Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes Award; Ron Schoenbrun, the Chief Justice Earl Warren Award; Joe Lanza, the Carl Judson Rector Memorial Award; Sarajane Milligan, the Woodard, Hall & Primm Award; David Wallace, the John A Maxwell Award and Kelly Cloud, The Kelly Ann Cloud Award. Writing awards were presented to Michael Plotz, the South Texas Alumni Association Award for best Article; Suzanne Lehman, the John J. Worley Writing Award; Brad Smith, the Maurine Elizabeth Bailey Award for Best Article on Procedure; Cliff McAdams, the Ph...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

PAGE 10 ANNOTATIONS MAY 1991 'No problem' Reservist returns to South Texas By Steve Petrou South Texas senior Joe Willie, who missed about half his classes when he was called to active duty during the Gulf War, will be allowed to graduate with the rest of his classmates this May. At one point during his active duty stint at an Air Force base in Louisiana, Willie said, he became concerned about his status as a law student when he learned that the registrar's office mailed a tuition refund to his home in Houston. But he said all his concerns were allayed when he met with Assistant Dean Sandra DeGraw on April 1, one day after being released from active duty. "I was there five minutes," recalled Willie. "I said Tm home, I'm back,' and, she said, 'it's no problem.'" DeGraw said the class attendance requirements were waived because Willie was close to graduating and a friend of his mailed him audio tapes of the classes he missed in Procedure III. Willie said he studied in the law library ...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

MAY 1991 ATIONS PAGE 11 Most Candidates Agree, You Need More Than BAR/BRI, SMH, Pieper, etc., to PASS YOUR MULTISTATE EXAM!!! If you want to pass the Multistate in the 1980s, take PMBR. BUT if you want to pass the July 1991 bar exam, TAKE REED MULTISTATE REVIEW (the recognized leader in Multistate preparation) "In the 1980's many students utilized PMBRs questions hoping that similar questions would appear on their bar examination. As a result of a recent lawsuit and subsequent changes by the bar exam drafters (NCBE), PMBR's materials will no longer appear on your Multistate Exam!!!" Nó other course offers what Reed Multistate has: REED vs. PMBR Guaranteed Pass Program Faculty: Law Professors who PASSED their first MBE and take it regularly Computer-graded diagnostic MBE Video and audio programs Over 600 MBE Jlash cards 98% PASS rate in February '90 96% PASS rate in July '90 TESTMASTER software (1600 questions) 32 issues verbatim on the Feb '91 MBE Not offered Not offered (most lectu...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 May 1991

page 12 annotations may mi CONGRATULATIONS, GRADUATING THIRD YEARS! NOW YOU JUST NEED TO ACE THE LONE STAR BAR!!! Our live lectures begin on May 20, 1991 and will be held at Krost Hall in the University of Houston Law Center. Classes will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday - Friday. Videos are available at both Kaplan Centers for you to review at your convenience. WE'RE THE ONLY COURSE THAT OFFERS THE COMPUTERIZED DIAGNOSTIC ANALYSIS! For more information, call the Kaplan Center at 988-4700 or call Julie Templin, Representative, at 850-7649. YOUR SERVICE-ORIENTED BAR REVIEW IS STRONGER THAN EVER IN TEXAS!!! STANLEY H. KAPIAN-SMH BAR REVIEW SERVICES

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 September 1991

ANNOTATIONS Vol. XX No. 3 The Student Newspaper of South Texas College of Law September 1991 Long-distance stUSÍSDlS. Some find just getting there is half the battle by Andy Marker Three days a week Kathleen Matey gets up at 4:30 in the morning. She quietly dresses so as not to wake her children, and then leaves her house by 5:30 to catch a 6:30 a.m. flight from Corpus Christi to Houston. After laud- ing at Hobby Airport, Matey boards a shuttle bus which drops her off at South Texas College of Law. After a full day of classes, she heads back to the airport to catch a flight home. But, her story is not unusual. Matey is one of a handful of South Texas students who travel hundreds of miles every day to attend classes. They come from as far away as Dallas and Beaumont. They are the kind of students who make Southwest Airlines proud, giving new meaning to the term "frequent flier." In addition to the usual school con- cerns, these students also must endure can- celed flights, constructi...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 September 1991

Page 2 Annotations September 1991 Editorial Boom in enrollment could turn into bust for graduates Like Houston itself during the oil boom of the early '80s, South Texas College of Law is busting out at the seams. Thanks to the largest entering class in school history, South Texas now boasts enrollment of more than 1400 students. But, it seems South Texas may be following the same path that turned boom into bust. With more and more stu- dents being accepted, the question arises just what awaits them upon graduation. Given that the job market has tightened consider- ably, just what is SouthTexas really offering - a legal education but with little realistic opportunity for employment after gradua- tion? While record enrollment figures certainly are impressive, what do those numbers mean to students and legal employers? Despite the increase in the size of the entering class, there was no corresponding increase in the entrance requirements. Legal employers have said they look at admissio...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 September 1991

September 1991 Annotations ) Good grades, top bar score yield few job offers for top STCL grad by Steve Petrou He finished as the number one student at South Texas and he had the top score on the state bar, but it took John Wilson months of knocking on doors before finding his first job as a lawyer. "I'm surprised I didn't get a higher number of job offers," says Wilson, who graduated from South Texas in December 1990. "It's a very, very tight job market out there." Wilson worked as a research chemist while attending South Texas at night. When he received his diploma, he learned he had the highest grade point average in his Despite his top ranking, Wilson says he only had one job offer from on-campus interviews before graduating, but he turned it down because it was not in his area of specialty -environmental law. "I guess I was selective," says Wilson, who also searched for legal jobs in his native state of Virginia. After taking the February 1990 bar exam, Wilson got another surpr...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Annotations — 1 September 1991

Page 4 GRIS BY, from page 1 Grisby has found diversity is a sure-fire recipe for success. And, more changes are on the way. With the renovation of what for- merly was the student lounge, Grisby's has tripled its space. "It's going to be easier to work new items into the menu because I have space to work on new items," he said. ' 'I really have tried to work on some lighter items. I've had lots of the ladies tell me they want something lighter," Grisby said. How- ever, there is hope for those who do not count calories, too. Grisby plans to add more des- serts to the menu. "My hobby is baking. I have more space now so I can come in with more desserts." He said hamburgers are the most popular item on the menu, followed by red beans and rice, and gumbo. The busiest times are lunch and class breaks. The snack bar goes through a case of 500 12-oz. styrofoam cups a day, serving water, iced tea, coffee and soft drinks. Business has tripled over the last five years, he said. Grisby, who turn...

Publication Title: Annotations
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
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