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Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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PERSONAL PARS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

PERSONAL PARS. Mr. F. W. Schmidt, cabinet-maker, after 22 years' resideDce at Murtoa, left with his wife for Mount Gambier last evening. Daring their residence here the couple have been highly respected, and in deciding to spend their declining days amongst relatives and friends at the pretty Border town they have the very best wishes of all. Mr. John Doyle, the first-born male child at Murtoa, after spending a life time here, the last 13 years of which he has been employed as railway line re pairer, has been promoted to Yack andandah as ganger, and he will leave Murtoa to-day with his wife and three children. Mr. Doyle has been well liked by everybody, and he and Mrs. Doyle, both of whom are highly re spected, will carry with them the best wishes of all for their future welfare. Mr. Doyle was farewelled by his com rades and the townspeople last evening at the railway station, when he was pre sented with a purse of sovereigns. Mr. A. Wynne, for the past thirteen years senior partner...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Notorious Outiaw. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

A Notorious Outlaw. + On February 26, 1895, a cable gram from America stated that Billy the Kid had been shot by Pat Garrett. Billy tho Kid, ostensibly a cowboy, was in reality an armed guard and paid murderer. The "range war" in Newf Mexico was at its height. The men who owned cattle and those who owned sheep were at deadly feud with one;another and it was a question whether cattle or sheep should occupy tho ranges. Billy hired himself to tbu ciUlo owners, and stalked shepherds as men stalk game. His aim was deadly ; his cunning almost super human. When tho "range war" was ended by the military authorities, Billy turned bandit, and gathering round him a gang of desperadoes, robbed lonely ranches and murdered their inmates, until hia name became a terror and a byword. At last even the "Wild West" got its "dander" up, and decided that Billy tho Kid was to be hunted down. They said that Tat Garrett, sheriff, or chief constable, was tho man to do it. Driving up to the outlaw's lair, di...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER IV. THE WOOING OP SABINA. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

CHAPTER IV. THE WOOING OP SABINA. "Dkl you know poor Mr. Hether ington before you met him on the :Eairy Queen ?" : The speaker -wafe'a fair, aristocra tic-looking girl, with a face that spoke of suffering in spite of her youth. "No, but we soon became great friends," replied Josh, letting her in fer that he had been one of the. first class passengers. "Then after the shipwreck we were together in the boat until we were picked up," he added, looking round the drawing room and thinking that in spite of its shabbiness it was a grand old house ; but as Miss Ossington spoke, his eyes became fixed on her, and he reflected that if she was not exactly beautiful, she had a high-bred air, and looked what she was—an aristo crat to the tips of.'Hcr fingers. "Did he tell you anything about his nephew Donald, who died in Mel bourne ?" she asked ; and Josh saw that her facc had"become paler, and tears stood in her eyes, and it dawn ed; on him that she had loved the un fortunate young man. "Yes, he...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

A little coloured girl was called upon at school to write a sen tence on tlie blackboard containing tho word "delight." This is what she wrote—"Where was Moses when de light went out ?' de light went out ?•' 19 G4.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Indomitable Scot. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

The Indomitable Scot. -t A West Country Scot, who had engaged in the' manufacture of a cerium description of goods then 1 recently introduced . into tliat part, of'the country, found it ; .necessary, . . or conjectured it might- \be profit- - able, to establish- a p'ermaneht con nection with, some respectable house in London. With this , design he packed up a -quantity: of; goods, - equipped' himself for the''= Journey.'/^ nnd departed. Upon his axcivrii' he' made diligent inquiry as to those;-; who were likely to prove his best"- -■ customers, and accordingly proceed-'*; ed tp' call upon one of the- most opulent drapers, with whom he re solved to establish n regular cor respondence. When Saunders enter ed the shop in question he found it crowded with j customens, and the.,. : talesman all bustling about mal> ing sales, and displaying, their ;. wares to prospective purchasers. : Saunders .waited' what he consider ed a'1' reasonable ^time ; then in a lull of business' laid down hi...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DAIRY HINTS ON BUTTER AND CHEESEMAKING. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

THE DAIRY -f HINTS ON BUTTER AND CHEESE MAKING. Unless the churn is kept well venti lated, especially during the early part of the churning period, the I cream will become frothy through being charged with gas liberated J from the cream. Unless the churning is carried out satisfactorily the qua lity of the butter is bound to suffer. It should take from 20 to 35 minutes for the cream to turn to butter in the churn. Acidity in milk assists the action of -rennet; resulting in a rather firm curd. In making soft and other kinds of cheese where a soft, tender curd is required, acid milk cannot be em ployed. In some varieties of cheese the presence of acid, so long as the milk is not too sour, does not have a serious effect upon the resulting cheese. In the production of cream cheese, it is important to : use only pure treea cream, ami" to" mate the" cheese in as short a time as possible. In many, cases the flavour of cream cheese is at fault through the cream being kept too long while the...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE POULTRY FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

THE POULTRY FARM. .4 Feed early in winter. Crushed maize can be fed in winter. Cleanliness must be observed in the fowlhouse. [ Straw from the stable makes good ! scratching material for fowls. j Look out for roup. The first symp , torn is a watery appearance in the ; eyes. j In the scratching shed bury the grain in the litter, so as to make the ■ birds work for it. j To encourage egg production in I winter, it is best to keep your fowls in dry, warm scratching sheds. ! To kill worms in fowls, give fowls i pills of thymol, consisting of one ■ grain of thymol mixed in a- soft ■ bread pellet. For cramp in fowls' ilegs, it is best to gently rub the limbs with eucal yptus oil, and keep the birds in a j dry, warm shed. The egg is the most nutritious of j foods. It contains 10 per cent, of car : bohydrates, 12 per cent, of albumi | noids, 3 per cent, of salts, and 75 ; per cent, of water. I Five turkey hens are equal to a i hundred-egg incubator in the hatch I ing season. They can be set ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
When Walking is Hard Work. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

When Walking is Hard Work. ' ♦ Feople often express > surprise that soldiers on the march cover only ten or twelve miles of ground per day.' Even then a good many men fall out through fatigue, some faint, and. the whole are completely done up at the end of the day. But the soldier is, nevertheless, a first-rate walker. It is all a mat ter of foot-tons of energy expend ed. Take an ordinary laborer, and ■his day's work will be equal to 300 tons lifted one foot high. An eleven-stone man, walking seventeon miles on the level, does the same amount of muscle work. But mark, if he carries an overcoat weighing 61b., ho does 311 foot tons. Now, the soldier is a regular pack-horse, and the kit that he car ries averages about 601b. in weight. So that he does exactly, as much work in a twelve-mile march as an ordinary man in his seventeen-mile walk. Besides, the soldier has to "break camp" before starting, and at the finish of the march he lias to pitch camp, draw water, collect fuel, clean ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PART 2. CHAPTER III. A MYSTERIOUS LOSS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

PART 2. CHAPTER III. A MYSTERIOUS LOSS. . It .was a. lovely morning oarly in /:October, the lawyer had gone back to London, after spending, a day or two,'at"the Hall, with Josh, and in troducing him to the steward, who had managed the estate in the late Mr. Hetherington's time, and ex plaining . various matters to him ; hut in return not one word had fal len from' the lips of the man who had come "into such unexpected inheri ; i ' tance as to what his former life had "been or where he had lived before^ he / : went to Australia, and there were 'only-two facts about him of which ,Mr. Saunders felt sure, that ho was cute and reticent. and on his journey to town he mused as to whether this reticence was natural or assum ed to conceal something that he did not wish to be known. Meanwhile, thankful to be rid of • the lawyer, Josb Hetherington, as he was now called, proceeded to the li brary, and having locked the door, he took a paper out of his pocket book,' and "after carefully studying...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Ether of Space. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

The Ether of Space. Sir .'Oliver Lodge.. delivered a lec ture at Bedford 'College, .the-'other tlay, on the "Ether of - Space." He stated that '.'he wns not sure" about the ether" being cohesive or not..- Mr. G. T. How ley now writes :—"I would like to project the theory ' that' ether'licyond 'the boundary of our "gaseous"atmosphere can ibe n'ot other"; than vcohesive.,.: be-. cause it is certain' that there are no gases or dust, or vapour, of- any description to separata the parti cles of ether in the unfathomable' space. Therefore if must be" pure, and, being pure, must essentially -be cohesive. Not so where it abounds in our atmosphere, for the molecules of oxygen and hydrogen,-'-together with the other gases, being con stantly changed by the climatic influences, interfere with the. cohes1 ion of ether. . It might be said of the inexplicable ' nature of radium, that it is a substance which dis agrees with the particles of ether coining into contact with its sur face, and throws t...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) —THE—THE CURSE OF THE BLUE DIAMONDS. SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS PART. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

11 ■ "1 IIIIPMW . (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) meshTsITfate. : 0 R, THE CURSE OF THE BLUE DIAMONDS. -t ? ByHedley Richards, Author of "The : '4 - ^Mine Master's Heir," "Time, the " Avenger," etc., etc. SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS PART. • The story opens in Australia, where "Joshua Wedmore, an unsuccessful miner, is tramping along in search of fresh fields. Entering a hut he dis covers a man on a rude bed, ill with the fever. Whilst administering to the sufferer Wedmore notices a small bag and a loaded revolver under the pil * : low. On examination the bag proves to contain blue diamonds of enor mous value. These lie appropriates, as he considers the fever-stricken one • has only a few hours to live. Wed more goes on his way, finally reach ing Melbourne, where he books a Pas sage for England in the Fairy Queen. . "The vessel is wrecked, Wedmore and . .aa - elderly man named Rupert Heth •. .. erington, of Wynthshay. Hall, being the only survivors. After many days of sugering and exposure they are ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRAVELLER AND ARTIST. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

TRAVELLER" AND ARTIST. Ha would sat ont oa an Orientaf tonr with" a Banifbag. Most of hiff necessaries would be forgotten, bufc aever his painting materials. Yefr upon one Spanish town he wrote a" ~ diary of fifty-five pages! Nothing could be more superb tnan his gorgeous im pressions of the East, though some oB his Italian studies might have given' the cue to the Futuritic people. Con^ trary to expectations,, when he held his tirst exhibition in 1892", Bis works1 were received with enormous praise; Apparently the Whistler attempts, in reality akin to Brabazoo; were held to be something quite distinct.- Or;, may be, the oritics, from Ruskin down wards, were delighted with the man's personality, while Whistler seems to< nave taken delight in offence as a fine art. And now a new generation cau se© twenty-four of Brabazon's pictures1 in colour, cod read the comments of" Mr Lewis Hinl, who is a master o£" the appreciative art. It is a hand-' some book am1 reveals to the world...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PLUCKY IMMIGRANTS. HOW THEY BEHAVED ON THE NARRUNG. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

^ PLUCKY IMMIGRANTS. . 45k- x BOW THE? BEHAVED ON SSB NAK11UNG. Dr South, who was medical offices on the P. and 0. steamer Naming when she enoountered the fierce gale in the Bay of Biscay, has much to bay of the courage shown by the 250 im migrants who were on board the Tea sel at the time. "We hear a lot about British deo*d enoe nowadays," he remarked, "h»fc after seeing the manner ir which those immigrants faced what we all ~egard ed as certain death, I am convinced that the oic dauntless British courage is still there. When ohe gaie was at it height our chances of coming safely through it appeared to be about one in a thousand. All on board, in fact, reconciled themselves to the ueiief that ttiere was to be uo co-aaorrow for them ~T and yet in the face of such peril there was not the slightest sign of panicu There were two Jewish si store on board who cried a little, but they were soon quietened. It was the worst, gale Captain Bid well had ever experi enced." Questioned as to his...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CAREFUL DRIVER. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

THE CAREFUL DRIVER. Mew many acres of. tillable farm land will one hoisa work.2 This, of: course, dopcndi on the kind: af farm— j ing done, on tho kind o£ machinery, used and on the eflideney of tb» man* [ oho workr tho hordes. It would nofc : be difficult to find 100 acreb of tillable^ i land worked in. one case wish' trvvo.' good horses and from this on up to six work horses. Probably more de pends on the ability of the driver ten handle his horse than any other one; thing. Some drivers will take more •nt cf the is horses at one round with che plough than another will in tw® roundt,. in one case the ploughing: is done in a hap-hazard sort of way* the horses are tangled; at the ends^ arc. barked and turned unnecessarily^ are jerked viciously when out of line^, and possibly the harness does no£ fit properly. In the other case the hor ses are given a steady, true gait whicls is kept up, the turns are smooth ancS without yelling apd jerking and ^he driver watches the working. o7 his? ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A WAR CORRESPONDENT'S ADVEUTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 26 June 1914

A WAR CORRESPONDENT'S- * ADVEUTURE. Mr. Augus Hamilton tells liis exp erience as a captured war corres» Dondent, in the "Fortnightly". Hidlhar L'roni the Turkish hues, he was seized h.y Bulgarian troojis. After beiner. promised courteous treatment he was declared b.y another company of offi- • cers to be a Turkish spy, and con demned to be shot next morninjr. His; statements were declared to be lies and his credentials for<reries~ Iiap uily he was identified in time and eventually liberated, with apologies i'or his maltreatment..

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NOTHING SERIOUS. A BURNING QUESTION SOLVED. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 3 July 1914

NOTHING SERIOUS. i 7 A BURNING QUESTION SOLVED. A clergyman of a certain village' was one Sunday questioning his scholars. He asked them quite a" few questions which they answered . very well. After he had finished he asked the scholars if anyone would carc to ask him a. question or two. There was silence for a time, then a little hoy got up and asked the • following question : "Why was Adam never abby ?" The clergyman was rather' non plussed, and did not "know what an swer to give the boy. All at once a little boy in the corner got up and said : "Please, sir, I'll tell him." "Go on, then," said the clergy man, encouringly ; "you tell hint." "Please, sir, it was because there was no one to nuss him," came the triumphant answer. I A G'OOD TWO MILES. I After a hard day's work at the manoeuvres, a battalion of Terri torials were marching wearily along a seemingly interminable country, road, when they met a man on horsetonck.. .... ... j "I say," said the officer In. com- ' ruand, "how ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Weather Made to Order. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 3 July 1914

Weather Made to Order. Is it possible to make weather to order ? In the opinion of that emi nent scientist, Sir Oliver Lodge, it is by no means beyond the powers of man, and he advances the sug gestion that exploration of the up per regions would result in dis coveries which would enable us to control tli'e weather. The latter, he contends, is merely a ! matter ut cltictviccxl co*\.<ii.<.ioTvo, n.rul I tho ingredients necessary for fine weather are an upper atmosphere charged with positive electricity j and a negativo charge upon the earth's surface. Much, he says, could be done oy placing a copper rod round the earth parallel to the Equator and discharging millions of amperes (units) from this rod. Sir Oliver Lodge points out that we have spent millions on building rail ways, and why not invest capital in controlling the weather by this means ? Meantime, while we are thinking about the copper rod, much might be done by electricians. Sir Oliver Lodge suggrsts t...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Oft-Told Tale. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 3 July 1914

An Oft-Told Tale. T The talo of the loss of the Birken head has often been related, but can never be too often told. The troop transport left Simon's Bay on February 26, 1852, bound for Port Elizabeth. Seven hours after leaving Capetown she struck a rock, and twenty-five minutes later nil that was visible was her masts, crowded with despairing survivors. Among the troops on board (drafts sent out to the Kaffir War, then raging), who gave a still unfor l gotten example of calm discipline and unflinching courage under such terrible circumstances, were some of the Twelfth Lancers under Captain Bond-Sheldon, a veteran Who still survives. Ordered to'jcjet the horses over board, the captain succeeded in do ing so, his own charger among the rest. Some swam landwards, some out to sea ; but most doubt less became the prey of the sharks, which,, hovering around tho doomed vessel, added a new terror to the situation. Then an effort was made to get out the boats, filled with women and children....

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Only Recently Abolished. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 3 July 1914

Only Recently Abolished. , f Delaware has punished thieves, highwaymen, assailants of women, and pick-pockets by pillory and whip ping-post since 1717, when the first court sentence to the pillory was recorded. Delaware having no penitentiary, punishments are inflicted in coun ty gaols. In each of tho county seat gaols at Wilmington, Dover, and Salisbury stood the last relics of the pillory in the United States. They have been used for punishing ninny forms of crime, principally wife-beating and petty thieving. In the Wilmington Gaol the pil lory was on a platform, erected above the whiping-post, making a two-storey affair. There are aper tures for two prisoners, so that they may keep company in their misery. It has been named "Susan." Sentences have been imposed fre quently requiring both pillory and whipping. In such cases the pri soner was made to stand one hour with neck and hands held fast in the vice, and then taken out for the whipping.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN OTHER LANDS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 3 July 1914

IN OTHER LANDS. ♦ A kite lifted a boy aloft at the military parade ground at Bouchin, near Lille, recently. lixperisnents were being made with the kite, when the anchor-rope broke, and the boy, | who was standing near, seized the end of the cord as the kite rose in the air, "in an attempt to hold it down. As the kite lifted him off his fee't, ho seemed powerless to re lease his hold, and was carried aloft while his mother, who was present, shrieked and implored the inventor to save her son. The kite rose quickly to a height of about fifty feet, with the boy dangling at the end of (he cord and screaming for help. Then suddenly it dipped, and when it wns at a Ixeight of about twenty feet the boy let go. I-Te crashed heavily to the ground, and was picked up suffering from severe internal injuries. Experimental tests have been made this fall in Chicago of a semaphore signal for the control of street traflic at the crossings. The semaphore ia broadly similar to those used in railroad ser...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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