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Elephind.com contains 118,866 items from Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Frozen Facts. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Frozen Facts. Tiie salary of the young King of. Spain is £150,000 a year. In tho Chinese town of Canton there aro on tho average 1,000 deaths a week. ?'?.'. Onion water applied with a soft brush will keop flios off gilt frames. ?...'?' In tho year 210 hardly a drop of rain fell in England, and 40,000 people died of famine. Until '40 years ago Japanese woro vacci nated on the tip of their noso. .-.. The Suez Canal is only 88 miles long, but it reduces tho distance from England, to India by Boa nearly 4,000 miles. In tho Great Firo of London, 1600, 13,300. houses, churches, halls, libraries, hospitals, &o., woro destroyed and only six lives lost. . The celebrated Sphinx, the figure of the crouching monstrosity near the Great Pyra mid, is 172 feot six inches long and 52 feet wide. ' The statomont is mado that during tho last 100 years France has lost 0,000,000 sol diers in war. Theiie aro credible records of over 7,000 earthquakes betwoen the years 1C0G u.o. and 1S94 a.d., and ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MAN'S A MAN FOR A' THAT. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

. A MAN'S A MAN FOR A' THAT. ' Give me a kiss my charming Sue,' Said a lover to a girl with eyes of bluo ; 'I won't,' said Rho, ' you lazy- elf, Screw up your lips and help yourself.' ' Why waste your time on him,' I said, 'Tho man is silly, stupid, flat,' Rebolliously she shook her head, ' A man's a- man for a' that.' The pen is mightier than tho sword when it eomes to' making flourishes. In old times parents brought children up, but now children bring parents down. A sociable man is one who, when he has any time to spare, goes and bothers somebody who hasn't. 'Yes,' he said, 'before marriage I thought I could live on love. But I am now living on my father-in-law.' A man who had a scolding wife, being asked what lie did for a living-, replied that he ' kept a hot house.' ' So far so good,' as tho boy said when he had finished the first pot of his mother's jam. The groat Jumna said he never knew a rogue who was not unhappy. Of course not ; it is the rogues who are not known who are ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MAKING THE BEST OF IT. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

MAKING THE BEST OF IT. A public singer applied to a theatrical manager for an engagement. He undertook to ning a; conplo of songs and execute a dance in character , at the rate of ten francs per night. The manager looked at the man, and seemed to recognise him. ' . ' Did you not once appear with a company of strolling players at the Veruou Theatre ? ' ' it's, was me reply. . ' But you played extremely badly,' ' 1 could not help myself.' ' Why, hqw was that ? ' 'Well, you see the manager never pnid the ? members of the troupe, so that when I pliiyed ' my part well I was applauded, though on tho verge of starvation all the while. But if I played badly, the audience pelted me with apples, und thus, at any rate, I got something to eat 1 '

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TALBOT GREY'S WOOING. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

TALBOT GUEY'S WOOING. 'TUrs. Temple, Mr. Gray ! ' In the most oomraonplaco manner and by a most common place person was the introduction effected, yet even as aha pronounced their names to little Mrs. Blake came an inirard conviction that this meeting was no ordinary one. Later develop ments proved her surmise correct. At the time she observed a 'sudden flush crimson the young widow's cheek, and ah un usual hesitation in her speech. Generally Mrs. Temple was thy life of any company graced by her presouce, and Mis. Blake had often envied her the perfect ease with which she accepted attention or dispensed hospit»lity. On this occasion her usual happy manner had deserted her, and she seemed distracted, uneasy— in every nay quite unlike herself. Mrs. Blake's suspicions were aroused, and she observed Talbot Grey with more than the casual glance she usually accorded him. He appeared to be intently watching Mrs. Temple, although ho had made small ettort apparently to engage har in conversa...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FASHION AND CRIMINALS. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

FASHION AND CRIMINALS. In the old days ot executions it was remark ' able to what a degree the prevailing modi s of dress were often influenced by notorious criminals. In the year 1615, Ann Turner, executed for the murder of Sir Thomas Overburu in the Tower of London, wore on the scaffold a high starched yellow ruff, which effectually put an end to tbe wearing of tbat style of dress. Hessian boots went out of fashion in Ireland early in the present century through their hav ing been worn on the gullows by Crawley, a young Dublin uttoruey, who had robbed and ciuelly murdered an aged female relative. Moro than three-quarters of a century ago, Dr. Tracy, a well-known physician practising in Dublin, was hung for theft. This unfor tunate man—a decided kleptomaniac, who was clearly not accountable for his actions — always wore on his professional visits a long cloak. Under cover of this he ?nana^Mr'^iteiil an immense amount of valuablo P^^^T^ jrom the houses of his patients. He waS u*-r^!...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HE NEVER DRANK. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

HE NEVER DRANK. On the sleeper on a Texas train recently a ' traveller noticed an old white-beardr d pintle man trying to get on a linen duster. Tbe young and spry traveller rushed to Lis assistance, and in helping him with his garment he noticed a good sized bottle of whii-ky protruding from 0110 of the inside pockets of his coat. Being of a, the coat of the stNUKsr, aud then pulling out the cork, said : ' Will you take a drink, sir ?' The old man did uotrecognise the bottle,and, drawing himself up, remarked rather severely : ' No, sir; 1 never drink.' ' It won't hurt you,' insisted the wag, ' it's the best.' . ' Young man,' said the old gentleman, in a tone intended for the wholo car, ' if you insist on drinking whisky you will be a ruined man at 40. It is the curse of tbe land. When I ;tfas a boy my mother died, and tho last thing that sainted mother did was to call mo to her dying, bedside and say, ' John, swear to mo that you. will never touch a drop of liquor ? ' Here the old ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Ocean Air. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Ocean Air. The purest air is to be found over the oceans, at some distance from the land. Here, as a rule, it is free from micro organisms. Ocean air is always more moist than that over the land, it being generally, even in fine weather, about throe-fourths saturated and often more. Ocean air contains a little salt. It is free from dust. It acts soothingly on the lungs, and on the nerves. It promotes sleep. A long trip on the ocean often relieves norvous strains and restores health. Tho storms at sea, however, may, if severe, act injuriously, and in cases of rheumatism and gout a sea voyage is not to be recommended.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Production of Honey. PART III. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

The Prodnction of Honey. — »«» . By W. S. Pendeb. PART III. We will now prooeed to .remove the goaled super, and I find the easiest way is to separate it. from the next unfinished super with a bee escape. This is a solid board with a trap let into it. The bees of Che super being shut off from the queen and the rest of the hive, make their way towards the trap, and pass down between a pair of light brass BDrincs which vield to their nreasuro when going through, but not to their return. By this means, in a few hours all the bees will be out of the super, when it can be removed and extracted. In a large apiary a dozen or more of these escapes would be used. It is a matter of a very short time to place them under bo many supers in the evening ; next morning the supers are found empty of bees and ready to be removed to the extracting room. When bee esoapes are not used, each comb has to be removed singly and the beeB shaken or brushed off, whioh takes a consider able time. Our super is n...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cyclists' Sore Throat. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

. Cyclists' Sore Throat. After a' spin1' along a more or less dusty road the cyclist sometimes ex periences a dry and subsequently sore and inflamed throat. Headache and depression often follow, and the symp toms generally simulate poisoning of some kind. When the baoteriology of road-dust is considered these offecta are hardly to be wondered at. Hundreds of millions of bacteria according lo the nature of the locality are found in a gramme weight of dust, and the species isolated have included well-known pathogenic organisms. Indeed, there can be no reason for doubting the infeo tive power of dust when it is known that amongst the microbes encountered in it are the microbes of pus, malignant cedemao, tetanuB, tubercle, and septi caemi. The mischief to riderB as well as pedestrians would probably be averted if, as nature intended, the respirations were rigidly confined to the nasal passages, and the month kept comfort ably though firmly shut. As investiga tors have shown, the microbe...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Woman and the World. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Woman and the World, In Africa woman is a slave, orlnglng under a savage, master. In India and China she is an animated machine, wound up simply to minister to the pleasure of some ugly, baboonish man. In Turkey she is a pretty, jewelled plaything (generally bought in the market), easy to Iobb, nnd, therefore, well guarded. In Spain she is a somewhat dangerous enemy, whom it is advisable to shut up now and then. ? In Russia she iB a sad, miserable com panion, whom it is considered good to beat from time to time. In Poland she commands. In America she tyrannizes. In France ahe is adored as a divinity, when she is not set to work in the fields or to sweep the streets. In England sho is generally on a sub missive equality, esteemed, admired, loved.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Cigarette Habit. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

The Cigarette Habit. It is a popular delusion that when' the smoke of a cigarette ib inhaled it pervadeB the air vesicles of the lungs, and the nicotine it contains is all absorbed into the blood through the delicate respira tory membrane. ' As a matter of faot the smoke reaches only to the larger bronohial tubes, probably in a majority of instances not to a point much below the larynx. To the mucous membranoB of these large air passages the smoke does little harm as an irritant, although it may aggravate pathological conditions already present. The surface by whioh nicotine ib ab sorbed into the blood is much larger than that of the mouth, however; so that, although relatively only' a little of the poison is contained in a oigarette, much more of it finds its way into the system than when the smoke from a cigar or pipe is simply drawn into the mouth and at once blown out. The inference to be drawn from this is that the inhalation of tobacco smoke is a bad practice. That it is more ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Machine for Scrubbing. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

A Machine for Scrubbing. The latest invention for lightening the labours of the housewife has been patented by a Kansas individual. The general appearance of the machine is much like a carpet-sweeper, and it is intended to be used in ihe same way — by being rolled over the floor. The invention is a complicated one, and the user would have to be something of a mechanic to keep it in order. The principal portion is a tank for containing the water or soapsuds with an adjustable faucet to discharge them on the floor. On the outside of this tank is a spring mechanism that must be wound up before the machine will work. It connects with a shaft that has a cogwheel fixed to it, and is arranged to rotate a serieB of brushes under the tank. That portion of the shaft that passeB through the tank is made to move a number of mops arranged on an endless' belt. They pass under the shaft and then upward through a set of wringers that remove the surplus water. From there they pass over a shaft nnd d...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The General and the P[?]diers. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Tlio General and tlie F^IcisT^-** The San Pi intisco ChionelS tells the following story : — ' ' . ; ? -\ The last clio of onf of Sousj/b over ', tures was just l\iii(, iw ij o\ i the sand i hills soutli n the 1 Ui f,i funds whe -* ' General Schollold stopped In-front of {the band and saluted the distihg'uiiWGd leader. Sous i i- turned the ?aiiluti. tincl sent one of hlfe men to esu i the General J t up Into the band stand «* 'That muHic wat- u auuim— ucauci^ ful !' exclaimed the Gen nil us he shook ^ Sousa's hand waimlv I ira aston Ished, sir, that you be/ such lesults. \lth so little dlselpllne ' , There Is nothing that Sou'sa prlde.sjhlm self more on than being one of Hie / T' strictest dlBclplIn ill ins and he was i 1 naturally nettled at thc'- enei il s crltl \ - cisin. 'Why Coijeial my jnauJU'e i i under perfect control liri suie fljeyi'«tf are thoroughly liilUxl ind I c in hayily '( \ believe that there Is unv lick of ^Iscl v| pllne. I haven t noticed It w- 'No, thats Just It ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Lost and Won. CHAPTER XII. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Losl and Won; ? CHAPTER XII. It was an ' eventful evening — the evening of the ball' at Sutton. Daisy gained her desire, and Colonel Trent made me an offer of marriage. Daisy was not at all reticent about the final coup which had forced the pink- faced young marquis to his destiny. .She .. told Gladys afterwards how she had led him so far that he could not retire, and how he had asked her to be Marchioness of Howglen. 1 My fate is settled — I. shall do as I like with ''my husband 1* she cried delightedly. 'I mean to enjoy life. ?:-.' I am so pleased, Maude, that I could ? almost forgive you,' she added, turning tome with a smile. \ ' I do not know what you have to .-?, forgive,' I replied. v..: ? 'To tell you the candid truth,' she Vsaid, 'deprived of fifty thousand pounds, I did not think the marquis would care for me. I find my charms more potent than I had ventured to believe. Now,' Gladys, I am to be Marchioness of Howglen at Christmas. What is the colonel going to do ?' This wa...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Darkie Mistake. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

; The WiftSlstake. A laughable incide/.J. ooourred at the Grong Grong railway-Btatipn; recently.. The train from Sydney brought up a few bags of freBh oysters. A number of aboriginals stood by, and never having seen oysters before, were somewhat sur prised at the appearance of the bivalves. ' Where him mouf ?' exclaimed oho of the moat inquisitive. ' How him eat ¥ Golly I I think am nothing 'cept gum. Yahl yah I' he continued, 'laughing at uih wig. x spec aura wnito iuuu un& blaok man a fool when he call that ister.' Just then he discovered an open oyster, and seizing it, he eyed itolosely. Not satisfied with the examination,, he placed it to his nose ; but no sooner waB that organ inserted between the Bhella, than they dosed. The darkie howled with pain, and called out : ' 'Pull um off 1 pull um off I' But the more the oyster was pulled the more he would not let go ; and as poor Billy danoed and yelled, his frantio efforts to rid himself of his uncomfortable nasal ornament ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Bad Bargain. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

A Bad Bargain. A small boy waa given a drum for a birthday present, and was beating it vociferously in the garden, when a very nervouB neighbour appeared and asked : ' How much did your father pay for that drum, my little man ?' ' A shilling sir,' was the reply. ' Will you take half a crown for itf ' Oh. ves, sir,' said the boy, eagerly. The bargain was made, and the drum put where it wouldn't make any more noise, and the nervous man chuckled over his stratagem. But, to his horror, when he got home that night, there were two druniB being beaten in front of his house, and as he made his appearance the leader stepped up and said, oheer fully: ' This is my cousin, Bir. I took that half-crown, and bought two new drums. Do you want to give us half-crowns, for them ?' The nervous man rushed into the house in utter despair, and the drums are doubtless being beaten yet in front of hia house. . ' '

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Qu-Qu-Quite Cu-Cu-Cured. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Qu-Qu-Quite Ou-Oa-Oured. K Scene: Hay Railway-station. Time: Easter Monday. Two gentlemen sitting at diagonal corners in compartment .of Sydney train. Outside of the carriage, a young lady, who addresses the gentle man at corner nearest her. ti' 'D-d-does t-t-t-this W-t-'train,' she stammered, ' gug-gug-gug-go to-to-to-to S-S-S Svdnev ?' , -' *, 'Ye-ye-yes, mum-mum-madam.' , ' ' Young Lady : ' Is there any ro-ro-robm f-f-forme?' ' Oer-cer-cer-oertainly.' ;??; ';? Young lady enters. JuBt then the train starts, and she again . opens the conversation by informing him that she is going to Sydney to Professor' D— '— , to get cured of stammering. ' ? Oh f replied the gentleman, ' I-I-I'm gug-gug-going up to that sa-aa-same professor.' Gentleman in other corner ohimes in : 1 H-h-how exceeding-ly fu-f u-f unny ! It was that sa-sa-same. p-p-p-professor t-t-t-that cu-cu-enred me I'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
She Was. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

She Was. I caught her in the hall. And twenty times I kissed her, And th6n contritely said : ' I thought you were my sister !' But what a sell, by Jove ! ? ? I felt so like a clam ! The girl I kissed laughed gayly : . ' You silly boy, I am !' '?

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Quite Appropriate. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Quite Appropriate. While the flre flend was getting in his work on a recent flre a literary gentle man, who was looking on, asked a friend : ' What three authors would you name in commenting on this conflagration ?' ' I don't know,' replied the other, ' what three would you name ?' ' Dickens, Howltt, Burns.'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Russia and Japan. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 2 November 1898

Russia and Japan. - A correspondent in Japan writes : — Russia is increasingly hated and by miany feared. She is closely watched, and some day will toe called to account for interfering with Japan's designs. Even good Bishop N.ikoiai, one of the best beloved foreigners, in Japan, has been compelled to make a public state ment disavowing all connection between religion and intematkxnal politics, or his beautiful cathedral in Tokyo, the most prominent gjjjgjg t)ulldlng in the capital, and the finest religious edifice, save a few of the largest Buddhist tem ples, in all J«ipan, might have been razed to the gro-nd ere this. The Kusso-Greolc Olvurch lias a hard time these days in Japan, and some of its adherents are Joining the Roman Catholic or Protest ant bodies.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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