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Title: Western Age Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 52,784 items from Western Age, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AMID HOSTILITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

AMID HOSTILITIES. ' -M The barber to the right of me was hochtng for the Kaiser, , , V The barber to the left of me was hackin« J for the Czar. fc . A gentleman from Greece was shearing of V my fleece, : \ I While very near a swart Italian stropped 1 his scimitar. ?-. - 1 And when presently discussion. -nniv-rw I ' fervid, , 4 On political conditions burst about my chair, I left Uie place unshaven— I h'ope I'm not a craven, ? But I sort of like to wear a head beneath my hair I —New York Sun.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BELGIAN HOSPITAL. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

IN A BELGIAN HOSPITAL. An English nurse in the Belgian Field Hospital writes:— We are not working at such high pres sure now as we were a few days ago. Things are quieter, 'things' being guns. 'We get plenty of wounded in to keep us busy, but mostly shell cases, as the Germans amuse themselves by dropping shells Into the vari ous towns in their neighborhood, and al ways someone is hurt. We aro the Bel gian Field Hospital, although at present we are working in a kind of college where nuns and priests abound. It Just happened to be handy, and the Government comman deered it for us. We have to rough it a bit, but as wc arc all trained and disciplin ed we can do it well. The wounds are not so awful as they were during the few weeks that these brave Belgians were holding the river. When the Germans got across wc bad to fly, of course, but after :M hours these sturdy lads drove them back across the river, and we returned. Just at present a gr-*at many of the Belgian solriats are resting f...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LATEST FASHION [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

LATEST FASHION* : ?». Fashion has at last dccidod to. rob as of tbe long-favored kikmono and Baglan sleoves, but not in this our Australian summer will the return 10 first principles in sleoves be intro duced. Later on, perhaps, in autumn and winter garments we shall bo whirled along in tht wakek of another .quaint revival old fashioned styles. For coolness, nothiqg could be more, ilcsirablo than the smart frock of linen', voile, of eaiilbri'c illustrated above, showing the uiile sash so much in vogue. It ia Jh.islii-d with self, buttons.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUICK SALE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

QUICK BALE. . A . motorist driving an antique car passed the vehicli gate without observing the gateman. The gateman' ran, after him and shouted: / ^ert 1 ^ ? ?Pillar, for -youi^- ' Tbe brake jammed, tbe car stopped, and . the owner got| out. . ? 'Well, mister,' he .ralil, 'Ritesn you've bought sutnpin. ' ' — G3.B.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
UNCANNY HAPPENINGS. A HOODOO SERVANT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

UNCANNY HAPPENINGS. 1 A HOODOO SERVANT. Jjl I never was very superstitious, but really A- some extraordinary things have happened here (writes a British officer from the front). We had a man In the company who was a servant to ? . He was killed, A us you know, and then his servant was .- taken over successively by ? (still alive), ? (killed), — (killed). Then when poor — ?-; came he asked me If i could tell him of a ^ servant. I mentioned this man, but told -;°£ hlm what bad luck this servant had brought ''h to the others, ? oniy niugneu at me, ,31 but, poor beggar, he went, too. Now tho v; servant Is wounded, shot 'through the hand ?! as he was taking a message out of the trenches for me. Another extraordinary thing Is tho way In ?*] which holy crosses, crucifixes, and Calvarys, In which the places abound, have escaped de- '*! struction. In Le Char itself there Is a Cal- . vary standing In the cross-roads now which . -» has not been touched by a single bullet or .1 shell, although ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BOMBS FROM THE AIR. SUCCESSFUL FRENCH RAIDS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

BOMBS FROM. ; THE AIR. SUCCESSFUL FRENCH RAIDS. 1 Even when driven a considerable distance .]* from a town the Germans do not give up their hope of destroying It, nnd when their shells no longer reach It they send their aero- \ . planes to drop bombs (writes a British officer from the front). A few days nfter the French had succeeded In throwing some V shells on the railway ntation of Freiburg In-Brlsgau. the Germans took revenge by V- dropping more than half a dozen bombs from an aeroplane on a small town In the north of France 20 miles from the firing line. In which they killed 14 persons and Injured about 2i» others. Two, however, can play at tthls game, and the German press Itself now mentions that y two French or English neroplanes have again 3 been seen In tho Rhino province and have ^ been flying over Dusseldorf. No doubt It ? was not for nothing they wGnt there. We ^ arc not told what damnge they did to the . j military structures. In another instance the ?'* Germans complai...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT SEA POWER MEANS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

WHAT SBA POWER MEANS. 'The meaning of Sea Power Is rather vivid-, ly brought out by the'fact that, so far as oUr Board of Trade is aware, there are only tfen GertWin merchant ships plying their business In all the setyk-of the world;' says the Pill Mall. ' ^ . ? 'Nearly 30 per. cent, or the enemy a ton-, nage is positively known to be captured, de tained, or shut' ut- iiilts own- or neutral har bors,- while on tne uritisn siae tne corre sponding percentage Is 2.9, 'With, these figures before' It, the meanest intelligence ought to' be' able to realise 'whh.t the Navy is doing,' The German War Of fice, in Its anxiety for copper niid ammuni tion Ingredients, certainly knows.' \

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FATHER'S METHOD. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

FATHBB'8 METHOD. ' When father talis about the war He doesn't put on aire., ? He calls It Liege, to rhyme with siege, The French he never spareB. Those foreign towns don't bother him, He needa no elever book To help him out when he's in doubt. He says them as they look. ? Though- some may call Nainur 'Nah-m'oor, ' ? ' -It's '.Nam'cr' plain to dad; .. * He doesn't pose as one who knows ?' Bach foreign guttural fad. .. He doesn't twist his tongue about To get 'em, hook or crook, The way thoy 're said, but plods ahead An ' reads 'em ao they look. ? Detroit Free Treat. '

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
War arid the Woman. BOOK III. CHAPTER III. (Continued.) [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

War arid the Woman. MAX FKUHXSZOZI, ! -Jr. BOOK in. CHAPTER IU. (Continued.) Through this press, by many a filthy street, the car conveyed the strangers to tjieir destination. This lay some way down | the Commercial Ho ad aud was officially w btepney. Long before they readied it, the uicrea.sing«tiiroug spoke of its where abouts. A vast mob of the hungry, tile homeless, and the desperate strove to reach a square-fronted building over whose doors were written in golden letters the words ? The Temple.' ? A shabby structure of dull red brick, this day it had become a house of salvation to the multitude. And high above them, upon the topmost step of a stairway which led to its unadorned halls, stood Uabrielle Silvester speaking to the people. She was dressed from head to foot iu grey furs, and her flaxen hair showed golden beneath the round cap of silver-fos which crowned it. The excitement of her task had brought a rich flood of colour to her round girlish cheeks, and her eyes were won...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WONDERFUL TRENCHES. LUXURY UNDERGROUND. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

WONDERFUL TRENCHES. -JS LUXURY UNDERGROUND. '1 found my regiment in the most wonder ful tranches 1 huvo even seen; they are -only -iiu yards from the Germans, but the works really ure marvellous' (writes Captain Vln'cy, of the Duraeta, to ills English relatives). 'You enter hy about 100 yards of deep communica tion trench, and then you come to a maze of passages, where a sentry stands to direct you to the part you are going to. 'L f-'rst went to see the colonel, and found ' him In a dug-out about gft. square under- '?'i ground, supplied with 2ft. of straw, several , ' sucks, and an old woolly carpet. ' Next was his kitchen, and then another dug-out for his , ?; servant and his orderlies; all very snug, with small charcoal stoves alight and lamps burn ing. Kvery man was supplied with 'straw and a sinull charcoal stove, and. the front of each hole was screened by a sack. One sentry. well wrapped up, was looking oUt at every twenty yards. The officers' ? dujf-outs were ^ the same as th...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MAD TURKISH DOCTOR. DAMAGE TO THE GOEBEN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

MAD TURKISH DOCTOR. | DAMAGE TO THE GOEBEN. 'fj There Is a comic side to everything, says a lady In Constantinople, writing to an Eng lish friend on December 16. When the police .tew took over the Chlhll lunatic asylum they turned away the director, who Is a French man, and replaced him by a Turkish doctor who had already been treated there several times for fits of madness. The first thing - ^1 he does is to take away all the straltjac kets from the violent cases. You can Ima glne the result. The next day he tells all the nurses that they must he ready to be ;£?; medically inspected by him twice every .*?4 night. ? and ? ure trying their (y hardest to get this mad doctor away before ;?'$ he lets all the lunatics out. We are having little panics and little talks . of mas.mcres all the time, but one gets used ^ to everything. The local papers are full of Prussian and Turkish victories and the /a vilest articles against us. Such vitupera tlon! — it almost becomes ludicrous. To-day the...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BRAVE BRITISH. FRENCH OFFICE'S APPRECIATION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

THE BRAVE BRITISH. FRENCH OFFICER'S APPRECIA- I Tioft; - | A French officer of the famous Chasseurs Alplns, 7th Battalion, writes:— 1 must tell you about the first day on which 1 came into touch with the British Army in the fighting line; it was a seance In which 1 found all tho characteristics of the British race. During the whole of yes terday we went right along the British troopS and sincerely i dmlred the luxury which prevailed in the transports, and, above all, In the ambulances. There are huge convoys of hiotors with fine cars requisitioned In England, autos of tho Red Cross, Daimlers with silent egnlncs, with stretchers on wheels to avoid all shock to the patient. It Is absolutely sumptuous, and wo kept on nsking ourselves how a country that offi cially was not prepared for war on land had bren able so soon to procure such highly perfectloned material. Another of my Impressions was the splen did bearing of your English soldiers, to such a point that on meeting u soldier ono ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ALTERNATIVES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

ALTERNATIVES. 'It Is certain that people prefer to Uav# .their pockets rather than their brains taxed, says the New Age.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SOLDIER'S WIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

THE SOLDtER'S WIFE. Av soldier's wife thus protests In the Lon don Star:— I trust you will allow me space to protest against the latest Insult to soldiers* wives by the War Office. The sooner they proceed with the war on Germany and drop the war on w'opien the better It will be for the nation. It Is cowardly to try and degrade us as a class on account of a few Isolated cases, tinohan/io ii» thA frnnt must feel tliait they are wanted at home to .protect the honor of the women who are dear to them. It certainly will not encourage others to en list and leave their wives to the tender mercies of a lot of temperance fanatics and the police. At any rate, the police of my district will have their work cut out to supervise my movements, as I sometimes push my baljy In a pram a distance of eight miles to 'visit friends, on the off-chance of getting a substantial free meal, for, after I have paid -rent', firing, lighting. &c., I have little left for food, much less drink. When my husb...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LOOKING AHEAD. AUSTRALIA A "DANGER SPOT." [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

LOOKING AHEAD. AUSTRALIA A 'DANGER SPOT.' It may seem rather premature to talk about the days when Armageddon will Ue behind and not around and before us (writes It. Saxon Mills in thu Morning Post). Vet the war may enu sooner than wu expect, and il will not do to leave all our provision for the days of reaction immediately following until the last shell has burst. The danger-spots of the ICmpIre after the war will be found not in these Islands, but in tho vast, empty spaces of our Oversea Dominions, especially in Australia, where less than live million Britons are warning, some thousand million Orientals -to 'keep oil the grass*' of a highly-attractive continent three million square miles In area. When the fighting is over we shall have our vast disbanded armies to deal with. Thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands, of young men will have been bitten with the love of adventure and open-air life, and will never willingly return to the routine oi counting-house and factory. And if t...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TIPPERARY FREE. YANKEES MAY SING IT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

TIPWEHJWV; FREE. YANKEES MirY SING IT. Secretary Daniels has asserted that he 1ms not Issued an order forbidding tlie singing by officers and men of the navy of Tlpperary, the popular song Associated with the British forces (says thq New Tork Sun). His state, ment was called forth by the receipt of a letter nrotfistlne. aealhst 'his reported action. Mr. Danl.ls said' that the' department knew nothing ofc the. matter other' than the report that the commanding officer at New port' had. placed a bah' on- the soiig. He ex pressed' himself 'as' id agreiment' with the report ed oplnion'or the Newt-ort officer that at all official gatherings ' or entertainments songs generally:, recognised ns marching songs of the belligerents ought not to be suHg by men qf the navy. ' : Mr. Daniels 'drilled- that he had any lnten tlofi or attertlpting'to dictate what the men or the navy should ? sing except at official gatherings. . The entrance of Portugal 'lnto the conflict sonM»B6w''reniIJra» us-orthe ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HAECKEL'S WANTS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

HAECKEL'S WANTS. Professor Ernst Haeckel, of Jena, ihe well known disciple of Darwin, says, according to the Mornlnr Post, that the following fruits of victory 'are necessary ensure Ger many n future: — 11) Freedom from the tyranny of England, secured by (2) The Invasion of the lirltlsli piratical State by the German Army and Navy, ana the occupation of London; (S) The partition of Belgium; the western portion as far aa Ostend and Antwerp to Be come a German Federal. Stale,' the northern portions falls to Holland, while the south eastern portion .will be abided to Luxemburg, which also -becomes a German Federal State' (I) Germany obtains a-, great ' part of the British colonies and tbe Congo State; (5) France must give up a portion of her i north-eastern provinces; (6) Russia must be reduced to impotency by the re-establlBhment of the Kingdom of Poland, which will: be. united with Austria Hungary; '? (7). The Baltic provinces of Russia are re stored to Germany; (8) Finland becomes a...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ENGLAND'S FINEST SHOT. POTTING FLYING WASPS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

ENGLAND'S FINEST SHOT, j POTTING FLYING WASPS. j Sportsmen are generally inclined to agree that to Lord Walslngham, whose third mar riage recently took place, belongs the dis tinction of being the finest shot In England. At one time he was the only man In the world whose aim wa*s so accurate that he was able to shoot wasps on the wing. This feat requires a marvellous eye and the steadiest of hands. Lord Walqlngham had a miniature rifle specially constructed for the purpose of shooting these pests. His lordship also holds the record for an unsurpassed grouse-bag. One year, when shooting single-handed for fifteen hours, he had accounted for 1070 grouse. On another occasion with 1100 cartridges he accounted for 842 birds, an amazingly high average. Another record is also held by his lordship An enthusiastic entomologist, he spent yeatti in getting together the largest collection of moths and butterflies In the world, which he presented to the nation by deed of gift in 1?01. The collect...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TAKING TURBAH FORT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

TAKING TURBAH 7 FORT.' I A British soldier thus describes the opera tions which resulted in the destruction of Turbah Fort:— We went round l'eriin Island and found a place to land In. Another regiment and part of ourselves were landed first to get a covering position, so that the remainder could land. As It happened, the whole show was over before anyone else landed; In fact, we only landed a part of my regiment. I went off in one of the first boats with about fit! men. and a tup tnntr nu In i boatloads. Wo were fired on by the Turks' I guns on our way to the shore and one man ! In our boat was hit Just as we got near the shore by a shrapnel bullet. He died the I same evening. We had to lie on the shore I for about four hours collecting men as they ? arrived before we could do anything. The | other regiment advanced against the right I flunk of the enemy's position, and we lay down nnd fired on them In front. They had I two guns firing at us, and some shells camo I rathe r unpleasan...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE DECADENT'S DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 13 February 1915

THE DECADENT'S DEATH. Mr. John I«ane, the London publisher, In an Interview In the Montreal Gazette, said:— ''I am convinced, for instance, that it will mean the death of decadence In British fic tion, and in British literature generally. Wo have been living too luxuriously, tbe nation has become to a certain extent enervated. Now has come the call to duty, and the duty will Involve a certain amount of self-sacrifice. As the luxury and the. consequent weakness have been reflected in some of the books of reccnt years, so In the years which will follow the termination of this great struggle, we may lbok for a more, virile,- a more earnest', a more thoughtful literary .output* 'Mr. Lane paused, : and nodded through a tiny cloud* of cigarette smoke' toward the form of Prof^Stephen .Leacock, the friend who, having introduced him to the Gazette^ reporter, was leaving' the reception room, of the University Club. ' 'There,' he resumed, 'Is the typical writer of to-day and of to-morrow; not ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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