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Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE BANK CLERK'S VADE MECUM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

THE BANK CLERK'S VADE MECUM. What is money?—A coign of vantage. What <s a banker?—A man who lets people in, to pay them out. 0 By what standard does a banker judge his customers?—By "deeds" alone. Should there be a run on the bank, what Quality should the banker display?—"His re serve." What gymnastic feat does a banker always admire?—Balancing. Why should a cashier make a good newspaper reporter?—Because he is always taking notes. How does a ledger-keeper become proficient? —By posting himself in current accounts. In what respect does a bank resemble a foun dry?—The ledger-keeper casts columns, the manager inspects forged instruments, the staff takes a keen interest in "screws," and the cashier sometimes makes a "bolt."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LOST ONE CLIENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

LOST ONE CLIENT. The stranger entered the lawyer's office with a brisk step, and, going up to the first clerk he saw/asked: "Is Mr. Deeds in?". It happened that Mr. Deeds was not in, but the stranger chanced to accost one of those smart f ) aieck clerke, the supply of whom largely exceeds the demand. The clerk at some stage of his short career had become possessed of the information t!<at the Latin words "non est" mean "he is not," and be accordingly replied with a smirk: "Sorry to say, sir, Mr. Deeds is a 'non est' maa just at present." "An honest man, is he?" said the stranger. "Ah, well, I'm not looking for legal freaks this morning. Good-day." —"Town Topic#."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT'S IK A NAME? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

WHAT'S IK A NAME? "The other day I was fairly stumped," says a bookseller, "when a party came and asked me if I had 'Wait a Minute.' " 'Never heard of it.' said I. " 'That is funny.' he answered; 'it is being talked about, and I am anxious to read it.' "I looked over my book lists, and satisfied my self that there was no such book in exist ence, and he went away disappointed, with an impression. J fear, that I was not keeping what I take pride in—a first-class book-store. "The day following, however, he came back smiling, and asked for Tarry Thou Till I Come.' He had taken the precaution this time to write the title down."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

| THE SMILE CURE FOR SICKNESS. ! • ■ "KEEP THE CORNERS OF YOUR MOUTH TURNED UP." ) 4 ) The "smile cure" has become a cult in Minnca ) polls (U.S.A.). Patent medicines and physicians* ) prescription® have sunk to the lowest level of ) popularity. Hypochondriacs and neurasthenics / have slunk shamefaced into their corners. / "Loathed melancholy" has gone into permanent ) retirement. And all because it occurred one day ) to a prominent Minneapolis doctor to tell hia pa S tients to smile. s Patient after patient would come slowly and ) sadly and self-pitylngly into this doctor's office, ( and occupy hours in telling the many kinds of ( anguish endured. The doctor listened, as became ( him, and prescribed sometimes one pill, so/ne / times another. But the average of health and I cheerfulness did not seem to rise. Finally tbe / doctor thought out the following prescription:— ) "Keep the cornens of your mouth turned up." ) The patients tried it. It worked like a charm. ; With the mouth tur...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FAMILY DISTINCTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

j A FAMILY DISTINCTION. r Mistress: *>Atid where did your mother take yju J for your holiday, yesterday, Mary?" > Maid: "Oh, v;e went to Madame Tuasaud'g, ) m'm; we always goes there when mother comes > up to town. You see, it makes it so interestiBg, > 'avin' uncle in the chamber of 'orrors." >

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HE COULDN'T SPEAK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

( HE COULDN'T SPEAK. < Bilklns (suffering from a heavy cold): "I met 45 different acquaintances this morning, and Just 44 of them told me of some cure for a cold." Wife: "Didn't the forty-fifth offer any ad Bilking"No. be had a cold himself.' '—"New { York WeeVly."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SPUN YARNS. NO. 2.—PEGASUS PENNED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

SPUN YARNS. 5 NO. 2.—PEGASUS PENNED. J (BY "JIMMY.") ( The absolute authenticity of this story ia s vouched for by that well-known Australian lden > tity, Mr. Smith; and, although I have changed ) the' name of the chief actor in the bifurcated ) drama, the main facts are true. The hero is a well-known metre-monger, while the incident came under my notice during ' a sojourn on the outskirts of the Bohemia in ? which he and his more practical half reside. ? I was two-thirds of the staff of a certain pro ivincial journal at the time, and Mr. Chuntler's beer and inspiration took concrete form in our columns when news was scarce and he was sober. Chuntler's menace was primitive; there was a painful simplicity about the poet's meals and clothing, which gave eloquent testimony of the remuneration his genius received, and pointed pathetically to the length into which, a pound may be stretched . It was at a time when the subject matter was wanted that 1 crossed the Chuntler's threshold wi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS. As advertisements are restricted to a few columns only in "The World's News," advertisers should make early application for space to prevent disappointment.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STAGE ANIMALS. HOW THEY ARE WORKED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

STAGE ANIMALS. HOW THEY ABE WORKED. This is the subject treated, at some length and with illustrations in the "New Penny Maga zine." The writer remarks that stage animals are very proud of the organs they can move. If they can roll an eye, they never cease to roll it so long as they think anyone is looking; and if they can switch a tail, they switch it. This weakness for showing off gets them into trouble sometimes, just as weaknesses in general get real animals into trouble. Hence, an elephant with a fine, freely moving tail, began to switch that tail with great vigor while on its way to the front of the house. Just as it was emerging from the side into view, the woolly end of the tail, in its abandoned flights, caught a gas jet, and at the same instant caught fire. The fire spread as rapidly as dry gummy canvas and dry withies could make it spread, and the elepnaut appeared in a blaze. Fortunately for the men inside, the flames were on the top, and the first intimation they receiv...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EX-M.P. "FLEECED" OF TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND POUNDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

> > E2X-M.P. "PLBECBD" OF TWO HUNDRED I THOUSAND POI'XDS. The affairs of Mr. Adolphus Drucker, formerly member of Parliament for Northampton, were re cently before the Bankruptcy Court In London. It vu stated that the debtor about three years ago came into a fortune of £200,000, and inasmuch as he had been "fleeced" of the whole of it. it would be necessary to account for every penny of the amount. The matter was being investigated j by a firm of chartered accountants, and the trus ! tee was also giving all the assistance he could in [ the matter. All parties consenting, the case was f adjourned until January 30.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The World's News. [?] RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS.N [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

[pie World's News. i •l record op notable events*? ! a— ,» < Issued from the office of "The Daily Tele- j fcraph," Sydney, and available every j Saturday morning at all newsagents | throughout the Commonwealth — One j Penny per copy. < j Communications intended for publica- < lion should be addressed to the Editor. ; « \ Business communications should be ad- ( dressed to the Manager of "The World's j News." 14? King-street, Sydney. (

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUAINT CEREMONIAL. PRINCELY INFANT PRESENTED ON A SALVES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

QUAINT CEREMONIAL PRINCELY INFANT PRESENTED ON A SALVES. The birth of a son to the Princess of Asturias, sister of little King Alfonso of Spain and heir presumptive to the Throne, has revived a curious old ceremony of the Spanish Court. When the baby Prince was born, the Prime Min ister, the Presidents of the Congress and the Senate, the high functionaries of the Court, and the commander of the Royal Halberdiers, to whom is entrusted the .guarding of the Royal family in the palace, were summoned to the ante chamber of the Princess, where they waited in full uniform. The chief doctor then dressed the baby, and, placing him on an immense silver salver, took him to the father, who was also waiting in the ante-chamber, and to whom he said: "Sir, it is an infante" (a prince). The father then took the salver in his hands, and, after kissing the baby, bowed to those present and showed them the new Prince, who will be chriBtened Alfonso.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHRISTMAS BATTLES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

CHRISTMAS BATTLES. —+— It is curious how often the season of pgace and goodwill has been marred by furious fight ing. The Jameson Raid, it will be remembered, occurred just after Christmas. During the Americas Civil War. the savage fight at Stone River was on Boxing Day, 1862. Two Indian Christmases have seen British troops in battle array. In 1843 the Mahrattas were our foes, in 1845 the Sikhs. In the latter battle the Sikhs were badly beaten, but the hero. Sir Robert Sale, was killed. Two thousand Germans and French died in a battle near Dijon, at Christmas-tide of 1870. Bonaparte also fought two Christmas battles—one in Italy, in 1800; the other, a drawn engagement, at Fultusk. in , ISO*.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
An Extraordinary Loadstone IT ATTRACTS MEN, METALS, AND CATTLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

An Extraordinary Loadstone | IT ATTRACTS MEN, METALS, AND J CATTLE. ! A deep hole of water in Kplynn Creek in Ken tucky has for some time been attracting atten tion by reason of the fact that it has a very strong power of suction. For years it has been known as the "suck hole." It is about 10 feet deep, and about 50 yards long. The water is clear, and the bottom can easily be seen. This hole has been watched by people for a number of years, and it has also to some extent been avoided. It now appears that it is no "suck hole," but in the bottom of the river it is claimed there is a streak of powerful load stone. A man in that vicinity recently constructed a large and substantial raft for the purpose of invfrbtigating the causes of the suction in this particular part of the river. It was discovered that the river bottom is solid rock, and that through the centre of the rock, running length wise, is a black streak. It is about five inches in width, and runs the length of the whole. The...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HER WORST ENEMY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

HER WORST ENEMY. Peace: "You make such a noise they can't beau my voice." —"Punch,"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW CLOUDS ARE FORMED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

HOW CLOUDS ABB FOBMED. • • A meteorologist ventured the opinion that not many people could accurately describe the nature and formation of clouds. "Clouds," he explained, "are formed by the moisture in tie air. That moisture is constantly present, but is quite invisible so long as it re mains iu the form of gas. It becomes visible when the air containing it is cooled by any means, the moisture being thus condensed and revealing itself as a mist. "The clouds seen to hang on the tops of hills and mountains are due to currents of warm, moist air striking the cold mountain side and condensing. In most cases the appearance of clouds thus formed is a sign of rain. "Clouds are of several different kinds. Thus the large, white, fleecy clouds that float in the sky on a fine day are known as cumulus clouds, while light, wispy ones are called cirrus clouds.''

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW WASHING MACHINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

NEW WASHING MACHINE The "Richmond" rotary washer represented In the illustration is claimed to be In the front rank of machines of the same order. The tub is extra large, made of Virginia white cedar, thoroughly seasoned—the beet wood known for resisting the action of water—and ha# corrugated sides and bot toms. It is finished with fiat galvanised hoop at top, and two strong galvanised electric welded wire hoops, sunk in grooves. This wire is too strong to break, and cannot drop off. The mecha nism of the machine is simple. There are no cams, clutches, or springs to wear out, and nothing to get out of order. The flywheel can be turned in either direction. The leg-holders are fastened on with galvanised carriage bolts, which gives them great strength and durability. Tha machine is easy to work, rapid in action, and, it is 6aid, with proper care, will last a lifetime.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NATIONAL NICKNAMES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

NATIONAL NICKNAMES. Most nations, like most individuals, have their peculiar nicknames, but there are only two na tions whose nicknames are commonly used all over the world. John Bull and Uncle Sam are familiar wherever English is spoken; and Uncle Sam is the happy possessor of two pet names— he is, of course, Brother Jonathan, too. When Washington was in need of ammunition he called together a council of his officers, but ■with no result, and as the council broke up with out arriving at a decision Washington said, "We must consult Brother Jonathan," meaning Jona than Trumbull, the popular Governor of Connec ticut. Jonathan found a "way out," and his same has ever since been loved and honored in the State*. The origin of "Uncle Sam" is asso ciated with a much more trifling incident. There is said to have been a store on the Hudson River kept by Elbert Anderson and his uncle, Samuel Wilson, and the uncle was familiarly known as Uncle Sam. The stores were marked in big let ters, "E.A....

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COPPERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

•COPPERS. # On the 17th December, 1860, a Royal procla mation of her late Majesty Queen Victoria autho rised the new bronze coinage of penny, half penny, and farthing pieces, thus abolishing "cop pers," though this name is still applied collo quially to such coins. Instead of being com posed of simply copper, the metaU now used ia bronze—a compound of copper and tin, with sometimes a little lead. The change was made in consequence of the rapid decrease in the quan tity of copper produced from British mines, which, in the year 1856, amounted to 24,257 tons of this metal in a pure state, worth £2,983,611; but for 1893 it had been reduced to no more than 425 tons, of only £20,522 in value. There is still 95 per cent, of copper in the bronze coinage, though, to economise it, so much less is em ployed in their manufacture, or the money made so much smaller and lighter, that th^ present penny is of about only haflf the value of the old copper one.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
After the First Test Match. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

After the First Test Match. ENGLAND V. AUSTRALIA.—"I say, Archie, don't lay it on so thick. Remember it's my ground you're playing on." —Adapted from "Westminster Budget."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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