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Elephind.com contains 12,593 items from Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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PHOTOGRAPHS IN NATURAL COLORS. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

PHOTOGRAPHS IN NATURAL COLORS. For many years past photographers have been experimenting with a view to turning out portraits in natural colors as cheaply and successfully as the ordinary black and white photo graphs:, ^There lias, however, been one difficulty" in the way. Although ""jex pert photographers are able to'"fake color-photograph snapshots on glass, so making a kind of transparency, while the ordinary amateur can make fine exposures on glass quite simply with the aid of screens, no one could discover a paper on which color photographs could he printed to any number in the ordinary way in a frame. A certain English chemist, however. Dr. J. H. Smith, claims, after experimenting for a number of years, to have produced a paper which will enable anyone .to produce prints showing the natural colors of the subject. Furthermore, it will be pos sible to produce these photographs by means of sunlight, just as is done in the case of the ordinary silver prints by every amateur. At pr...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ben Was Wise. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

Ben Was Wise. A young Lancashire mill-worker had a mental relapse which resulted in his being sent to the county asy lum. After he had been there a few weeks he was visited by one of his fellow-workers, who came across him in the grounds. "Hallo, Benny!" said the visitor, "how's tha gettin' on?" "Oh, Ali'm goin' on first-rate, thank ye," answered the afflicted one. "Ali'm very glad to hear it, lad," said the visitor pleasantly. "I sup pose you'll be comin' back to work soon, eh?" "Wot!" exclaimed Ben, while a look of great surprise spread over his countenance. "Leave a big house and a grand garden like this to coom back to work! Hon, dost tha think Ali'm wrong in my head?" To him that wills ways are not wanting.

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SLEEPING ON THE LEFT SIDE. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

SLEEPING ON THE LEFT SIDE. There Is little doubt that an im mense number of persons habitually sleep on the left side, and those who do so can never. It la said, be strictly healthy. It is the most prolific cause of nightmare, and also of the unpleas ant taste in the mouth on arising in the morning.' 'All food, enters and leaves the stomach on the right side, and-hence sleeping on the left side, soon after eating, involves a sort of pumping operation, which is anything Hut conducive to sound repose. The net ion of the heart is also seriously interfered with, and the lungs unduly •jressed. Hence, i' is best to culti vate the habit or sleeping on Hie ■ icht side, altliough S.wlow and other si'ims: men are said to invariably -leep on their backs.

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WOMAN OF THE FUTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

THE,WOMAN OF THE FUTURE. I By "Mrs. Harris." We hear a great deal about her, ray friend—this woman of the future! Hardly can we take up book, magazine or newspaper without seeing her made the subject of comment, criticism and prophecy. Especially are our men folk concerned with her; 'from the youngest to the oldest, all have some thing to say—she can no more be kept out of their conversation than could King Charles's head be kept out of poor Mr. Dick's. And by a curious subtlety of thought discussion on the women of the fu ture nearly always begins and ends by attacking the girl of the present. I have only just laid down an arti cle In which all readers were solemn ly Informed that no such thing as a sympathetic, womanly girl was to be found to-day; that she gave no thought to anything but her clothes, her par lies, and her sport; and we were all called upon to behold a future where ivoman would refuse to take up any duties as wife, mother, or home-maker. The men of the nation were ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Heavy Blow. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

A Heavy Blow. "Well, Cliarles didn't blow his brnins out after all because you re fused hiin. He proposed to me in stead." "Did he? Then he must have got rid of them in some other way." A gentleman recently on a visit tr. London had been commissioned to buy a blouse at a bargain sale which his wife was unable to attend. The task was a novel one, but he finally got the attention of a saleswoman. "1 want tQ buy a blouse for a lady," he said. "What bust?" she asked. He glanced around with nervous ap prehension. "Why—er—I didn't hear anything." Why will people put on long faces when it is so much easier and more comfortable to laugh? Tears come to us unsought and unbidden. The wisest art in life is to cultivate smiles, to iind the flowers where others shrink away for fear of thorns. The boy who "never gives his par ents a moment's worry" seldom gives them much feeling of satisfaction later on. them. ■ ■ . ~ "

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
JOHN MORROW'S HEART [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

JOHN MORROW'S HEART I By \V. M. O'Kane. John Morrow, solicitor, Lincoln's Inn, was not furrowing his brow and making calculations on his pad on be half of one of his increasing band o£ clients. Neither was the morocco ' bound book with a brass lock, to which he frequently referred, one that kept a record of clients' money. He was engaged upon his own private affairs, and the look of anxiety upon , his strong, handsome face had nothing whatever to do with his practice. Everyone connected with "the law" in London knew that .Morrow was a rising man—better than that, he was regarded by his fellow-practitioneis and by the counsel whom he frequent ly instructed as entirely straight. "Thank Heaven that's done!" he exclaimed at last. He locked the book and replaced it in a small safe, cunningly set in the wall behind a swing case contain ing a dozen or so books of reference. After making an inquiry, by telephone, from his managing clerk, he produced an old briar pipe, filled and lit it, and...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
YAWNING FOR GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

YAWNING FOR GOOD HEALTH. According to most of our books on etiquette it is very improper to yawn; but from the standpoint of health ifc is one of the best tilings we can do. For one thing, a yawn ventilates the lungs. When you take an ordin ary breath the lungs are not complete ly filled, nor are they thoroughly emp tied by an ordinary respiration. There is a certain ipiantuy of air left in the lungs always—what physiologists call "residual air." This air in time becomes foul and affects the blood, and through the blood the nervous centres. Then at certain times certain nerves get tickled, as it were, and the result is a long-drawn-out yawp., which has the power of stretching the lungs to their fullest extent, driving out all the foul air and drawing in a supply of fresh, pure air. Yawning, too. is beneficial to your hearing. When you give an extra bis yawn you hear a cracking sound in side your head. That is due to the stretching and opening of -certain tubes which connect the ear ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KEEP EACH OTHER BUSY. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

KEEP EACH OTHER BUSY. Lord Gladstone's return from South Africa, where he has met with much criticism on account of his attitude on the native question, recalls a story recently told by Mr. Ambrose Pratt, who has had a good deal of experi ence with the Kaffirs. A director of one of the mines took Mr. Pratt around the native com pound ;\nd pointed out one of the Kaffirs. "That man,' he said, "is now doing his second term of work here. He re turned to us of his own free will." "Why did you come back?" Mr. Pratt asked the Kaffir. "Oh," was the reply, "me go back to kraal first time from mine with plenty money and buy wife. She got temper—fight me all day long. Much better come long back here and work to get more money." "But what will you do," asked Mr. Pratt, "when you have got more money?" The Kaffir grinned. "When got more money, go back kraal and buy another wife. Then me happy. One wife 110 good. Two wives good. They fight each other and leave me alone!" Little Boy: What's all the...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

For the moment a sense of relief swamped every other emotion, and Dr. Wilson, when he parted with his friend, believed that Morrow was now entirely absolved from care. Yet long before Morrow reached home he deep ly rogretted tho result of Wilson's diagnosis. If lie could but die, Ruby would be free. Surely his case was a good example of the irony of fate. John Morrow made a discovery that evening, but it concerned himself rather than his wife. He found that the instinct of the lawyer was strong er than that of the gentleman. Again and again he pulled himself up for watching his wife suspiciously, for putting to her leading questions, for laying conversational traps. One con clusion regarding her forced itself uopn him; she was a much cleverer woman than he imagined. She ap peared most anxious about his state of health, because of his pale face; she regretted, almost tearfuliy, her absence when he came home to tea, but she did not explain the telegram that had taken her out, and she ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A KINGSTON ROMANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

A KINGSTON ROMANCE. The wedding which recently took place at the Kew-road Wesleyan Church, Richmond, between Miss E. J. Chesswas and Mr. Thomas Tnnie. of Bournemouth, had a romantic story associated with it. Forty years ago Mr. Tame was an assistant in a chemist's shop at Kingston, and Miss Chesswas also lived in the town, at the home'of her grandpareuts. The two became ac quainted through taking part In work at the Kingston Wesleyan Church, and they became engaged to be mar ried. The parents of the lady, however, would not consent to the engage ment, and as a result, the lovers se parated, apparently for ever. Mr. Tame left Kingston and settled In Bournemouth, where he ultimately became a member of the corporation. He married and brought up a fam ily, but two years ago his wife died. Last year his daughter, who had been taking care of the home, married, and went to live at Surbiton. It -was then that Mr. Tame learnt t?8lt his first sweetheart 'was still single, and the two met, aft...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MIS-FIRE! [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

MIS-FIRE! Mr. A. R. llope-Moucrieff, who has just published uii interesting book "About Authors," tells this 6tory about a Fleet-street journalist. The journalist's hatter, who was pressing for the payment of a fairly heavy bill, hinted that if his business establishment were mentioned in an article in the paper with which the journalist was connected the debt would be cancelled. The journalist said he would try, so lie went home and wrote an amusing article . bout "Hats," beginning' with prehistoric times, and artfully work ing round to the present day, so as to bring in his creditor's name"; This article he kept by liirn. till, as will sometimes happen in a newspaper office, an article bad to be cancelled at the last minute and he was asked to Oil the vacant column. Immediately he produced his article on "Hats." The editor said it would do, and the article was sent to press. Next day the journalist called on h:s hatter, who received him with a scowl and wanted to know why he had, ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Off His Guard. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

Off His Guard. Among the members of a fashion able country club are a doctor and a minister, who delight in the exchange of repartee touching their respective professions. As they met one day, the minister observed that he was "going to read to old Thomson," adding, as lie was aware that the old man was a pa tient of his friend the doctor, "Is lie much worse?" With the gravest of expressions the physician replied. "He needs your help more than mine." On his guard, the minister ex claimed: "Poor fellow! Is it as bad as that?" "Yes," was the reply; "he is suf fering from insomnia!" "Have you 'A Heart that Aches'?" she asked .of the young man behind the music-shop counter. "No, madam," he responded, absent ly; "but I've a hollow tooth that does something awful." "I was just struck with an idea," sa?d Gus de Jay. "Well, if it's one of your own," re plied Gub's father, "I reckon you ain't likely to be black and blue from it."

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN AGAINST WOMAN. Why the Sex Treats its Sisters with Contumely Though it Loves Them at Heart. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

WOMAN AGAINST WOMAN. Why the Sex Treats Its Sisters with Contumely Though It Loves Them at Heart. By Dorothy Dix. One at the most curious things in the world is the latent antagonism thai women ^ show toward members ol their own sex. Of course, this is a matter o! in heritance and tradition, bred-in-tiie bone sort of feeling that is the re suit of woman's age-long struggle for a husband. Her bread and butter, her position in society, her interest in life depeuded upon her capturing some male who would furnish her with a home, and throw the glamor of his name about her, and so every woman's hand was against every oth er woman's, and she regarded every other woman who crossed her path with jealousy and suspicion. Now that woman has become self supporting, and marriage has become less alluring to her fancy than a career, she still cannot rid herself of this prejudice against her own sex handed down to her in her very blood from her forcmothers. It has become what Darwin calls an ac qui...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
All is Now Hushed. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

All Is Now Hushed. They met in a tramcar. "Why Miss H " "Why, George, is it really you?" 'Yes. I've beeu waiting to call, but " "We've moved Into a new house, you know." "So have %v&." "I was thinking of yon the other D-° -vou sti!1 P'^y the violin?" "Ves; I am practising hard just now." ' \ ou must come to see me ami bnng your violin. There is a young man next door to us who scrapes and saws at a violin until it sets my teetia on edge, and I just have to sing to drown the noise." _ "Ilow annoying! r'rrr learning 'Nor ma' now." "Just what that young man keeps on murdering night after night. Do come and play it for me. He would never try it agaiu, I'm sure, orrce he heard you play it."' I hanks, I will, and you must sing tor me. I wish you conld hear the girl next door to us-—her voice is iike a screech owl's!" "Really? People like that ought tv i.'c restrained by law. I am learning 'The Jewel Song' from 'Faust' just now. This is my street." "And mine, too. We must be neigh b...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REMARKABLE INSECTS. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

REMARKABLE INSECTS. The most valuable faculty possess ed by insects is their sense of smell. Most insects hear very poorly, and ants in particular are absolutely deaf. With all their batteries of eyes bul ging in every direction, these crea tures do not seem to enjoy very good eyesight. Some of the flying Insects cannot see well enough to avoid ob stacles which to them should look as big as a barn. But when it comes to tlie sense of smell the insect world is far ahead of any animal. Fabre, the great French entomologist, confined some female butterflies in a steel cage far from the natural haunts of the insects. To his surprise males of the species came from miles away and lit on the screen. He then confined the females in hermetically-sealed jars, ana placed them "hear places frequented by the males. Not one paid any attention, though the females were visible through the glass. To make sure that the sense of smell was the guiding force, Profes sor Fabre brought out some bits of pape...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
[?]n the route to the War [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 14 January 1915

the route to the War   writing to his brother at Woorarra Norman Ridgway, a member of   the first Expeditionary Force, gives a brief account of the trip, as follows: " Aden, Arabia.   "Fancy getting a letter with a heading like the above. I was going to write from Broadmeadows but had the knack of putting things off. In fact there wasn't much time there for anything. Here it is entirely differ- ent. There are places on a boat where a fellow can hide himself all day and write letters and miss all the work and drill it he is shrewd enough and I've been shrewd enough pretty often. We've had a great time since we left Australia, or at least ever since we went to camp. We spent a week at   Albany. We were on the first boat to arrive, and waited for other boats King George's Sound had never seen a sight like it before, with such a number of war boats. W'e did not land there. It is a pretty little place. The sea was beautifully calm for t...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DEAF PERSONS CAN HEAR. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 21 January 1915

DEAF PERSONS CAN HEAR. That the deaf can really hear and do hear, but in a different way from ordinary people, is a fact tliat few persons who an; not deaf under stand. Stanley Robinson, who be came deaf at the age of ten, tells in the "Scientific American" just how they do it. Xot only do the deaf hear sounds, but limy are often greatly annoyed by them. They feel sounds through the concussion on the diaphragms of their ears and the vibrations reach the brain, according to Mr. Robinson, through the nerves of feeling rather than by way of the auditory nerves. A deaf man feels the motion of a passing truck through the vibration it causes on the pavement. He does not feel the passing of a rubber tyred vehicle on an asphalt pave street, because this causes no vibra tions. He feels the footsteps of a horse if near by and not on the soft earth. He does not hear a stamp upon stone pavement unless it is <iuite close to him. "A deaf mute." says Mr. Robinson, "will be conscious of ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BETTER THAN WISHING. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 21 January 1915

.BETTER THAN WISHING. I)o you wish the world wore bettor? Let me tell you what to do: Sot a watch upon your actions, keep thorn always straight and true: Rid your mind of sellish motives, lo1 your thoughts be clean and high. Von can make a little Eden of the sphere you occupy. Do you wish the world were wiser? Well, suppose you make a start By accumulating wisdom in the scrap book of your heart. Do not waste one page 011 folly; live to learn and learn to live. If you want to give men knowledge you must get it ere you give. Do you wish the world wore happy? Then remember day by day Just to scatter seeds of kindness ur you pass along the way; For the pleasure of the many may be ofttimes traced to one, As the hand that plants the acorn shelters armies from the sun.

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ANIMALS WHO FIGHT WITH SOLDIERS. What Military Pets Have Done. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 21 January 1915

ANIMALS WHO FIGHT WITH SOLDIERS. What Military Pets Have Done. The news that the pet gout of the 2nd Battalion of the Welsh Regiment has been killed in the Battle of Aisne reveals the fact that the soldiers are taking their regimental mascots to the front. This is a common practice in war, as each regiment regards its pet as a luck-bringer, and thus it is only natural that the animal should accompany the soldiers to hattie. Re gimental pets on many occasions have distinguished themselves on the battlefield. In one instance a regi mental dog proved to be one of the few survivors of a terrible British dis aster when the famous 66U1 were cut up 111 the Battle of Maiwand. Valiant Bob, the pet of the regiment, sat and howled dismally in the centre of the rapidly dwindling square where the Britishers stood back to hack, fighting against hordes of Afghans. When every man had fallen, Bob crawled over the bodies of the dead, and, al though ■wounded In the leg, travelled over ninety miles of ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXI. Dick's Return. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 21 January 1915

CHAPTER XXI. Dick's Return. At last the decision was made, and Sydney sat down to write her an swer to Robert, and the answer was "Yes." It had taken her three days to make up her mind. Twenty times during those three days she had deci ded it was impossible, and twenty times she had reconsidered the im possibility.. What had given the fin ishing point to the decision was a visit to Maggie. The children had a holiday, and were both at home, and the sight of the happy contentment of Maggie in her home, surrounded by husband' and children, had brought home to Sydney for the hundredth time her own lonely and isolated life. She was now verging on thirty; there were silver threads in the beau tiful hair, and she grew tired- more easily than she did a few years ago. Sydney had always had a faculty for looking forward, and seeing clearly— too clearly for her own comfort—in to the future. She saw herself middle aged, old maidish, solitary, left be hind, first with no one and uo one first wit...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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