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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

Thl Indian Advocaim.. 128 reduced by twenty per cent., and, in consequence, the num ber of children attending the schools gradually grew smaller, although a great many more were retained than the Govern ment allowance provided for, as will appear from the follow ing: Contract Average Fiscal Yeak. , number. attendance. 1896 , 2,531 2,995 1897 1,732 2,205 1898 1,672 2,272 1899 1,078 1,993 1900 534 2,000 This year, although no assistance will be received from the Government, the full number of pupils in attendance last year . c, 2,000 will be continued in the schools, and it shall be our aim in the future to maintain this number as the minimum attendance. To do this an annual sum of $140,000 ($70 per capita per annum for board, clothing", tuition, etc.) will be required. During the past two years the Catholic Indian Bureau, aided by generous friends, has been able to assist the schools in meeting the expenses entailed by educating pupils in excess of the contract number. Since June 30,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

Tin: Indian Advocait. 129 t the Government contributed towards their support. After 1870 larger appropriations were made, and the contract sys tem came into vogue. Encouraged by the Indian Depart ment's friendly attitude, the Church erected a large number of schools, and in this way invested about $1,500,000, which vast outlay will now be of no benefit, either to the Indians or the Church, unless a reasonable portion of the support which the Government has withdrawn is supplied by Catholic gen erosity. It should be noted that schools were not needlessly mul tiplied. According to the latest report there are in this coun try 272,023 Indians, of which number more than 100,000 are Catholics. At one time there were 3,500 Indian children in Catholic schools, and at no time have there been accommodations for more than 4,000. To adequately provide for the Christian education of children in the Catholic Indian population of 100,000 souls, we should be able to offer school accommodations for ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

Tub Indian Advocatk. 130 tub honor ok tub church at stakb. One of the motives that led to the discovery of America was an earnest desire to propagate the Catholic religion over every part of the world and to bring all races within the em-, brace of the Church. From the landing of Columbus until now intrepid missionaries have not ceased to consecrate their lives to the conversion of the Indian race, regardless of the numerous privations and dangers which attend such a career. In Florida, New York and other localities the Black Gown and his dusky converts, emulating the Christians of the early Church, again and again gave testimony to their faith and zeal in martyrdom. Shall this generation of Catholics be the first one in the annals of history to prove unfaithful to the apostolic spirit of the Church? Shall indifference make void, the blood of mar tyrs? the heroic labors of a Las Casas, a Marquette, a Bre beuf, a Jogues, a De Smet, the Franciscans of the Pacific Coast and the Mexican...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

131 The Indian Advocate. for the very existence of their missions, have absented them selves from their Indian charges in ordet to collect funds. It was a pitiful sight to see the aged Father Cataldo, S. J., recently collecting in the city of Washington that he might help to save the magnificent schools of the Jesuit missions from utter ruin. After toiling for nearly forty years among the tribes of the Northwest and sustaining untold dangers and sufferings, it would seem that he and others of his noble type might have been spared, by a generous Catholic public, the fatigue and humiliation of begging from door to door. Protestants of every description seem to find but little difficulty in raising ample funds for missionary purposes. "Within twenty years after the Civil War twenty-two millions of dollars were contributed by Northern Protestants for endowments of educational institutions in behalf of the negroes of the South, all these institutions being strictly re ligious. In 1895 th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

?I J-T-" jj.'WJ)Jjg.'S' i'uii Indian Advocai'k. 132 ,n ,f, V do no J' m: outdoni: in c.f.ni:rqmi'v. Hundreds of priests and nuns have given their lives for the spiritual welfare of the Indian. Can others not contribute a small portion of the goods with which God has so bounti fully blessed them? If every Catholic would give annually only a small con tribution to the cause, not only could our schools be perpet uated, but missionary efforts among the unfortunate Indians could be multiplied. vi: ci. adm' ri;ci:iyi:d, gladly m:t us oivi:. Let the Catholics of the United States bear in mind how much they owe to the generosity of Catholics in Europe, who, since 1822, through various societies, have contributed to the Church in this country the vast sum of more than $7,000,000. Shall we be less generous to our dependent Indians than Europe has been to us? aim'Lals to i:vi:ky onl. The work of converting the Indians is incumbent upon the whole Church in America. It should not be left to .the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

133 The Indian Advocate. discontinued, all the children would be forced into the "non sectarian" Government schools, where, in the course of a few years, they would lose every vestige of the Catholic faith. Moreover, our schools must be so equipped and conducted as to compete successfully with the schools of the Government. NEW DEPARTURE OK THE 15UREAU. For the future the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions will devote its energies to raising funds for the schools and missions. It purposes to account for every cent received and to annually place before its benefactors a full statement of re ceipts and expenditures. OIVE GENEROUSLY. We beg every one to contribute something, and while we expect only a small offering from the poor, we would urge those who are blessed with abundance to give as generously as possible. Tile Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, by Wm, H. Ketcham, Acting Director. NOTICE. Money should be sent by draft, .check, or money order (payable to Rev. Wm. H. Ketcham), ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

Tin: Indian Advocatk. 134 KIOWA, COMANCHE AND APACHE RESERVATIONS. An Act of Congress that was approved June 6th, 1900, has opened to settlers, under the Homestead laws, a rich and beautiful country in the Southwest. The region covers some four thousand square miles, and must become a subject of in terest and inquiry to hundreds of people. It is true the Indians, man, woman and child, have a first choice of 160 acres each of farming land. There are about three thousand oi these individuals all told. This leaves, hatred from entry by white men under the law, 480,000 acres out of the 2,560,000. It goes without saying that these lands, first choice by the Indians, will be among the best lands of the reservation. In many cases semi-civilized In dians have been living upon them for years. In addition to these farming lands, so to be allotted, the Indians are permitted by the Act to choose and retain 480,000 acres in addition of what the Act calls "grazing lands," "for the use in common o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

135 The Indian Advocate. so now, and they must be counted out for all immediate' pur poses. In addition to the Indian allotments exempted as above, the government survey sections numbered 16 and 36, and 13 and 33, are reserved, and are not subject to entry. The law says: "Sections 16 and 36 for the use of the common schools, and sections 13 and 33 for university, agricultural colleges, normal schools and public buildings of the Territo ry and future State of Oklahoma." All missions and mission schools and churches now in operation on the reservation are entitled each to the quarter section on which it stands. All the remaining lands, after the reservations above enumerated, "shall be opened to settlement by proclamation of the President within six months after allotments are made, and 30 days advertising, and be disposed of under the gen eral provisions of the homestead and town-site laws of the United States." I his is the language of the Act. The reader will wish to know, perhaps,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

"f1 W?yf J '"" t"' ."JJWlKfW",yl-w"-"r- -7-t- The Indian Advocate. , i36 the south. It grows cold in the winter, but does not make ice in the streams, and old residents say actual winter, such as it is, is about on month long. Quanali Parker and Two Out of His Six Squaws. Pnncip il Chief of the Com niches Stock lives out of doors without provision or forage. But feed should be, and will be, provided by the new settlers.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

137 Tin: Indian Advocate. The products are corn, wheat and cotton. It will be the Upland alfalfa country par excellence. It is a most excellent region for all the small fruits, melons and vegetables. . It is known now to be an excellent peach country, and successful in all varieties of fruits that there has been time to try. The rainfall, as it averages year by year, is not yet relia bly known. The people who settled Oklahoma, near by, have been successful as upland farmers, and are to-day as prosperous as any in the republic. Persons who contemplate settling here under the Home" stead Laws should understand that the great bulk of the land, here as everywhere, is upland. The Indian allotments will probably be confined to bottom lands, and they ha"Ve first choice. They cannot sell the lands they choose. But these uplands, in relation to the bottoms, are at least as good, as they run, as those of eastern Kansas. It is, at the worst, a magnificent stock country. The deeper wells are in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

Thi: Indian Advocate. 138 'f Ife if

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

139 Thk Indian Advocate. lamation shall be issued, be the last, or almost the last, chance of the settler upon government land. The public domain, except where as in this case the Indians here and there can be induced to abandon their holdings, is a domain of rocks, alkali and sage. Nevertheless, this last choice is one that would have been among the first had it been accessible and open to settlement when government land was plentiful. THE INDIANS NOW ON THE RESERVATION. There are, as has been stated, about three thousand of them all told, and of all the three tribes mentioned. One sees them in large numbers at Anadarko and about Fort Sill, and as they are going to be neighbors of ours hereafter their conduct is from that view interesting. All of them are now, or imagine themselves to be, Chris tians, either Catholic or Protestant. All except the older ones understand, and can, when they will, speak English. All, up to a certain point, have adopted white men's ideas, garments and w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

Thl 1mjin AlJVOCAl'L. 140 together," he says. Their sub-chief is Esh-i-ti. The Com anches have built some laige houses and have fine farms. Herds of cattle can be seen on the prairie. The "big In- ti&smmzmj&Qmm&sssffigsmj SLaWStfius, Ah-pe-ah-tone, Principal Cliief of the Kiowas, and Wife. juns" have carriages, wagons, etc., but lie greater number live in tipis. This tube has always been noted as the mobt

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

141 The Indian Advocate. predatory and blood-thirsty among the prairie tribes, and have killed many more people than any other tribe in propor tion to size. They are supposed to have come from Wyoming, from whence they were driven by the Sioux and other prairie tribes. In 1719 they are reported as living in what is western Kansas. In 1805 they lived around the heads of the Arkansas, Red, Trinity and Brazos rivers, in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. They carried on a relentless war for about two hundred years with the Mexicans, many of whom they took captives and are to-day intermarried with them. They made their first treaty with the United States in 1835, and by the treaty of Medicine Lodge, in 1867, agreed to go on their present reservation, but did not take possession of it before 1874-75, after the outbreak of the Southern tribes. The Comanches hold themselves superior to other Indian tribes and do not intermarry with them. The Kiowas, after whom the reservation is named, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

r The Indian Advooate. 142 Indians. In 1840 they made peace with these tribes, and have since lived on friendly terms with them. The Apache, popularly called Kiowa-Apache, form the third tribe of the Kiowa reservation. In manner and cus toms they are scarcely distinguishable from the Kiowa proper. They form only a very small tribe (173), and have always been associated with the Kiowas as far back as the traditions of either tribe go. A FINAL TACT. As a final fact, the epoch of securing government home steads is almost over. The reservation here described is al most the last, if not absolutely so, of the vast realm that was in its day given to whoever would make it his home. The choice is proportionately reduced. It is no longer a question whether the average citizen wants it as a practical gift, but whether he can get it if he wants it. "Many years ago," says Bishop Whipple, when testifying to the honesty of the red Indian, "I was holding a service near an Indian village camp. My th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

H3 The Indian Advocate. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. PUBLISHED BY THE BENEDICTINE FATHERS OF SAORED HEART 'MISSION, OKLAHOMA. A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary. St Michael and St Benedict Approved by Rt. Rev. Theo Meerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION! Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . . .75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma PRIVILEGES I i. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prajers and good w orks of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2 A solemn High Mass is sung eery Tirst Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors 3. A Conventual Mass is offered e cry Tirst Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers, and Benefactors. 4. E cry year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses arc sung for our Bene...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

The Indian Advocate. 144 Ir, says Tom Reed, the United States can kill 10,000 Filipinos in ten months and call it benevolent assimilation, how many did Spain have to kill in 300 years to warrant the United States in designating Spanish rule as barbarism? X X Sta'i istics show that America has more divorces annually than Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, Belgium, Austria and all the lesser European countries. This is a fearful record. Still, with Mohammedanism, Theosophism, Buddhism and Materialism preached from the pulpits in our great cities, what else may we expect? In the outside world, marriage is now chiefly regarded as a business venture, not as a sacrament. An appeal has been sent to the Department of the Inte rior at Washington for aid for the suffering Zuni Indians in Northeastern Arizona and Northwestern New Mexico. A portion of the tribe near Rohmah, Arizona, is in a fearful condition from lack of food and clothing. Rations at the Agency are totally inadequat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

H5 The Indian Advocate. and A. P. A. -ism, high lords of agnosticism, .and no little fiercely-directed antagonism. In all these opposing forces the printing press is powerfully arrayed against Catholicity. X X One of our ablest and most conscientious missionaries has vehemently denounced the policy of the Administration regarding the Indians. After having related the edifying deaths of two of these children of the forest, both of whom had been entrusted to his pastoral care, he continues as fol lows: " 'That the only good Indian is a dead Indian,' has now for a long time been a malicious and knavish proverb. Those, however, who die as the two I have mentioned above, are surely the most fortunate of all. Looking at the present Indian policy, we are convinced that those Indians who have the good fortune of still being alive are also doomed to cer tain death, if Uncle Sam does not increase their rations, or give them employment so that they may earn their livelihood. The sessions of Co...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

The Indian Advooate. 146 io- k CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. continued. ir. We now come to examine the claims of the so-called in dependent Moral Law. The champions of this system, while freely admitting the necessity of imparting to the youth a moral training together with merely intellectual knowledge, advocate a moral teaching which rests, not on God, Creator and therefore Supreme Law-Giver of mankind, but merely on social order and man's individual conscience. Such a system is, in theory, a tissue of absurdities, both in its enunciation and its elements, and, in practice, a fosterer of crime, despotism and servility. What is Moral Law? Moral Law is a law whose sphere of obligation embraces all mankind; a law at once absolute and immutable, fixed above the vicissitudes of time and space; a law that binds the con science of the ignorant laborer and of the scholar, of the sovereign and of his subjects, of the individual and of soci ety, of the civilized nation and the barbarous tribe. To be...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

147 The Indian Advocatk. follows that a code of laws enforced on man by a moral or social agent destitute of such an authority is utterly void and amounts to a mere non-entity. Now, such is the case with the so-called independent Moral Law. Eliminate God as author of Moral Law, what will the result be? Man, urged on one hand by his conscience, which is nothing but the voice of reason, to walk on the footsteps of justice and morality, and solicited on the other by his animal instincts to embrace a career of vice and injustice, will find no adequate reason why he should, as a matter of duty, obey the voice of the former in preference to the suggestions of the latter. For what is reason to me? Did my reason create me? Did it endow me with any of the essential attributes that make a man of me? As I received nothing essential from my reason, I do not de pend upon it for my existence. Therefore I am independent from it. To be "author" and "have authority" means one and the same thing. The...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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